Display Calibration 101: Step-By-Step With Datacolor's Spyder4Elite

Spyder4Elite How To: Getting Started

Since the Spyder4Elite software is entirely wizard-based, we’re able to capture the full sequence of screenshots to show you the process. Begin by opening the Spyder4Elite application from the desktop (OS X users open the main Spyder4Elite app from Launchpad).

The first few windows simply ask you some questions about your monitor and its capabilities.

Welcome

The process begins with a little pre-flight checklist. Warming up any display is important to calibration accuracy, since light sources change as they come up to temperature. At least 30 minutes powered on before beginning any calibration is highly recommended.

If you haven't already, take this opportunity to adjust the room lighting to your preferred level and explore the controls that are available on your particular display before clicking Next.

If this is your first time running the Spyder4Elite software, the next screen will not appear until the second time you run it.

Select Workflow

If you've performed a calibration using the Spyder4Elite at some point in the past, this screen gives you three options: Step-by-step Assistant, Studio Match, and Expert Console.

Studio Match is a simple utility for synchronizing your calibration settings across multiple displays. Expert Console is the Spyder4Elite's "advanced mode" calibration, which contains the entire contents of the multi-screen wizard inside a single window. In order to continue following this guide, select Step-by-step Assistant.

Display Type

Selecting the appropriate display type is also important. Since each screen technology transmits light differently, any meter needs to use special offsets for the type of display being calibrated. The Spyder4 software has options for LCD, CRT, Laptop, and Projector.

Select the option for your display and then select Next.

If you have multiple displays connected to your computer, select the monitor you wish to calibrate in the drop-down menu to the right.

Make and Model

The next screen asks you to identify your display’s manufacturer from a drop-down list, and enter the model number into a text box.

Because the Spyder4Elite software has model information built-in, the next couple of screens will likely appear different than ours, depending on your monitor's options. In order to simplify how the wizard branches out, and to show as much of the process as possible, for the next few screenshots we've chosen an Unknown make and model instead of using the Spyder4Elite's automatic detection of our AOC I2757H.

Display Technology

After clicking Next, you’re asked to specify the native color gamut and what kind of backlight your display has.

The options available for Gamut are Normal (sRGB) and Wide (AdobeRGB 1998), while the options for Backlight include Flourescent (CCFL), White LED, and RGB LED. If you’re unsure of either one of these, both have an option labeled Unknown.

After making your selections, click Next.

Identify Controls

The following screen holds check boxes for Contrast, Brightness, and Kelvin Presets.

Only check the boxes corresponding to the image adjustment controls available on your monitor.

If your monitor has the rare RGB Sliders, you can create this option by opening the File menu and selecting Preferences.

From here, choose Advanced Settings, and a new window will open. Now check the box next to Show RGB Sliders option in Identify Controls screen, then click OK on both the Advanced Settings and Preferences windows.

After answering these questions, click Next. Now it's time to start the calibration process. 

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  • Menigmand
    I still don't understand why we have to buy a $250 device just to get a proper picture on our screens. Why are they not factory calibrated? After all, in these days, the input is digital, so the display data should be 1-to-1 identical to (for example) game RGB data... I'm sure I'm wrong somehow, but about what?
  • mi1ez
    That was actually a genuinely interesting article! Good work Tom's.

    885869 said:
    I still don't understand why we have to buy a $250 device just to get a proper picture on our screens. Why are they not factory calibrated? After all, in these days, the input is digital, so the display data should be 1-to-1 identical to (for example) game RGB data... I'm sure I'm wrong somehow, but about what?


    The problem is twofold:

    Variance in the panels. Each panel would need to be calibrated individually adding time and cost

    The WOW factor. Many manufacturers will ship monitors with the saturation set too high so when you fist set it up it gives you the wow factor. I believe. This second one might not be 100% true and more of a showroom trick.
  • Will P
    A great article, a good introduction on an often overlooked aspect of the PC setup. Every screen I have ever bought has had a ridiculously high brightness out of the box, which I suppose could be put down to a 'Wow factor' for sure... The kit is expensive though, but if it is going to make every screen you own 20% better and last for 5 years it starts to look like a good investment.

    I was wondering if the re-calibration of the cheaper units (such as the Spyder) can be done with the Spyder itself or do you need specialist kit?
  • timbozero
    It is IMO ridiculous to suggest the spending of near the cost of a monitor to calibrate it.
    There are several Blu-ray Discs (Disney World of Wonder for example) that will achieve 80%+ of the levels of calibration for 10% of the cost.
    Was the author sponsored by DataColor or, just wildly out of touch?
  • mi1ez
    249904 said:
    It is IMO ridiculous to suggest the spending of near the cost of a monitor to calibrate it. There are several Blu-ray Discs (Disney World of Wonder for example) that will achieve 80%+ of the levels of calibration for 10% of the cost. Was the author sponsored by DataColor or, just wildly out of touch?

    How does a blu-ray calibrate a screen then?
  • timbozero
    142373 said:
    249904 said:
    It is IMO ridiculous to suggest the spending of near the cost of a monitor to calibrate it. There are several Blu-ray Discs (Disney World of Wonder for example) that will achieve 80%+ of the levels of calibration for 10% of the cost. Was the author sponsored by DataColor or, just wildly out of touch?
    How does a blu-ray calibrate a screen then?


    Is short (for the example I mentioned) , you get several display patterns shown and adjust your screen until they display as they should. You will need to do this a few times for each as some will impact others (you would have to with the Datacolor as well unless it can adjust your monitor automatically afaik). The colours are adjusted the same way but with a filter used by you to help 'understand' the data.

    This is a link to typical testcard used by the Blu-Ray http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/screenshot.php?movieid=16216&position=2
    This is a link to a review of the Blu-Ray on the same site http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Disney-WOW-World-of-Wonder-Blu-ray/16216/

    Hopefully that will help
  • mi1ez
    249904 said:
    142373 said:
    249904 said:
    It is IMO ridiculous to suggest the spending of near the cost of a monitor to calibrate it. There are several Blu-ray Discs (Disney World of Wonder for example) that will achieve 80%+ of the levels of calibration for 10% of the cost. Was the author sponsored by DataColor or, just wildly out of touch?
    How does a blu-ray calibrate a screen then?
    Is short (for the example I mentioned) , you get several display patterns shown and adjust your screen until they display as they should. You will need to do this a few times for each as some will impact others (you would have to with the Datacolor as well unless it can adjust your monitor automatically afaik). The colours are adjusted the same way but with a filter used by you to help 'understand' the data. This is a link to typical testcard used by the Blu-Ray http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/screenshot.php?movieid=16216&position=2 This is a link to a review of the Blu-Ray on the same site http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Disney-WOW-World-of-Wonder-Blu-ray/16216/ Hopefully that will help


    So do you have like a physical card to compare with what's on screen?
  • timbozero
    142373 said:
    249904 said:
    142373 said:
    249904 said:
    It is IMO ridiculous to suggest the spending of near the cost of a monitor to calibrate it. There are several Blu-ray Discs (Disney World of Wonder for example) that will achieve 80%+ of the levels of calibration for 10% of the cost. Was the author sponsored by DataColor or, just wildly out of touch?
    How does a blu-ray calibrate a screen then?
    Is short (for the example I mentioned) , you get several display patterns shown and adjust your screen until they display as they should. You will need to do this a few times for each as some will impact others (you would have to with the Datacolor as well unless it can adjust your monitor automatically afaik). The colours are adjusted the same way but with a filter used by you to help 'understand' the data. This is a link to typical testcard used by the Blu-Ray http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/screenshot.php?movieid=16216&position=2 This is a link to a review of the Blu-Ray on the same site http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Disney-WOW-World-of-Wonder-Blu-ray/16216/ Hopefully that will help
    So do you have like a physical card to compare with what's on screen?


    No, the only physical item (other than the disc) is a blue tinted filter which is used for one of the several tests.
    Brightness (as an example) displays a test strip and you adjust the brightness until your screen shows certain details but not others (as instructed by the previous 'chapter' of the 'film').
    There are several levels of testing and reading the review I linked will give you more of an idea.

    I did the setup for TV, projector setup (Datacolor products won't work on projectors as the device blocks the very image you need to measure) and my monitor. The projector wasnt far out and made a small difference, my monitor and TV were 'miles' out and the tuning with the disc worked wonders :)
  • mi1ez
    249904 said:
    142373 said:
    249904 said:
    142373 said:
    249904 said:
    It is IMO ridiculous to suggest the spending of near the cost of a monitor to calibrate it. There are several Blu-ray Discs (Disney World of Wonder for example) that will achieve 80%+ of the levels of calibration for 10% of the cost. Was the author sponsored by DataColor or, just wildly out of touch?
    How does a blu-ray calibrate a screen then?
    Is short (for the example I mentioned) , you get several display patterns shown and adjust your screen until they display as they should. You will need to do this a few times for each as some will impact others (you would have to with the Datacolor as well unless it can adjust your monitor automatically afaik). The colours are adjusted the same way but with a filter used by you to help 'understand' the data. This is a link to typical testcard used by the Blu-Ray http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/screenshot.php?movieid=16216&position=2 This is a link to a review of the Blu-Ray on the same site http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Disney-WOW-World-of-Wonder-Blu-ray/16216/ Hopefully that will help
    So do you have like a physical card to compare with what's on screen?
    No, the only physical item (other than the disc) is a blue tinted filter which is used for one of the several tests. Brightness (as an example) displays a test strip and you adjust the brightness until your screen shows certain details but not others (as instructed by the previous 'chapter' of the 'film'). There are several levels of testing and reading the review I linked will give you more of an idea. I did the setup for TV, projector setup (Datacolor products won't work on projectors as the device blocks the very image you need to measure) and my monitor. The projector wasnt far out and made a small difference, my monitor and TV were 'miles' out and the tuning with the disc worked wonders :)


    It's very much subjective still, rather than absolute. While I agree for most people this is pointless, if you need it calibrated you need it done properly. I wouldn't surprised if you could rent one of these if you looked hard enough.
  • timbozero
    It is not at all subjective, you need to use it to realise that it is 'absolute' but, it is not as accurate as digital metering (only close to).
  • mi1ez
    249904 said:
    It is not at all subjective, you need to use it to realise that it is 'absolute' but, it is not as accurate as digital metering (only close to).


    If you're using your eyes, then it is subjective. You can't say that everyone's eyes are the same, 20/20 or not.
  • timbozero
    *sigh* Think how you will , I am not here to change your mind.

    The brightness test (for example) is done with a graduated display thus :-
    http://static.highdefview.com/wp-content/uploads/review/wow/wow_brightness_thumb.jpg.pagespeed.ce.JIxKCdd3ek.jpg
    There is only 1 point on the brightness adjustment where the correct graduation will match and the only 'downside' (which you could even remotely call subjective) is that it will not be spot on (as a digital meter might be).

    There is another for contrast etc., etc., etc.. Once they are all completed .....

    Ah hell, try it or don't. It made a massive difference to my cinema room and for only 25$ which is a bargain compared to the digital meter (which was my initial point, that it's overkill to buy a meter)

    Peace, Out :)
  • mi1ez
    249904 said:
    *sigh* Think how you will , I am not here to change your mind. The brightness test (for example) is done with a graduated display thus :- http://static.highdefview.com/wp-content/uploads/review/wow/wow_brightness_thumb.jpg.pagespeed.ce.JIxKCdd3ek.jpg There is only 1 point on the brightness adjustment where the correct graduation will match and the only 'downside' (which you could even remotely call subjective) is that it will not be spot on (as a digital meter might be). There is another for contrast etc., etc., etc.. Once they are all completed ..... Ah hell, try it or don't. It made a massive difference to my cinema room and for only 25$ which is a bargain compared to the digital meter (which was my initial point, that it's overkill to buy a meter) Peace, Out :)


    We'll agree to disagree.
  • Flyfisherman
    Very interesting and much needed article, keep up the good work!

    But there is one thing that comes in mind, about the licence of the S/W.
    Is it possible to install the S/W and the colorimeter on more than one computer, or is it locked to the first computer once one has entered the activation code?

    Because I have several computers at home and really would like to use the equipment to do this calibration on them all.

    I assume that there should not be a problem to calibrate two monitors on the same computer?

    Best Regards from Sweden.