SilverStone Strider Titanium ST80F-TI PSU Review

Transient Response Tests

Advanced Transient Response Tests

For details on our transient response testing, please click here.

Ιn these tests, we monitor the PSU's response in two different scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V and 0.5A at 5VSB) is applied for 200ms while the PSU works at 20 percent load. In the second scenario, the PSU is hit by the same transient load while operating at 50 percent load. In both tests, we use our oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should remain within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These tests are crucial because they simulate the transient loads a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array or an instant 100 percent load of CPU/GPUs). We call these tests "Advanced Transient Response Tests," and they are designed to be very tough to master, especially for a PSU with a capacity of less than 500W.  

Advanced Transient Response at 20 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V11.842V11.710V1.11%Pass
5V4.987V4.896V1.82%Pass
3.3V3.357V3.220V4.08%Pass
5VSB4.960V4.898V1.25%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V11.824V11.693V1.11%Pass
5V4.965V4.877V1.77%Pass
3.3V3.344V3.206V4.13%Pass
5VSB4.930V4.871V1.20%Pass

The deviations at +12V exceed 1%. We're not exactly satisfied with those numbers; high-end PSUs are expected to land closer to 0.5%. The 5V and 5VSB rails perform decently, while the 3.3V rail demonstrates higher than 4% deviations in both tests. Thanks to high initial voltage, however, it doesn't drop below 3.2V. That's average performance, for the most part. 

Here are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing:

Transient Response At 20 Percent Load

Transient Response At 50 Percent Load

Turn-On Transient Tests

In the next set of tests, we measure the PSU's response in simpler transient load scenarios—during its power-on phase.

For the first measurement, we turn off the PSU, dial in the 5VSB rail's maximum current and switch the PSU on. In the second test, we dial in the maximum load the +12V rail can handle and start the PSU while it's in standby mode. In the last test, while the PSU is completely switched off, we dial the maximum load the +12V rail can handle before switching the PSU on from the loader. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V, and 5.5V for 5V).    

The waveform at 5VSB is almost perfect. In the other two tests, a couple of small waves aren't enough to ruin a good overall picture. 

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  • JQB45
    Tier-3 and I think I am being generous. I never thought I would see a Titanium rated unit with such poor performance. I base my decision on the 12V ripple and hold up time.
  • gdmaclew
    I'm not surprised that silverstone opted not to supply an on-off switch. In fact, I can see no reason why this brand keeps getting the high ratings it enjoys.
    I bought one 3 years ago to replace a defective PC Power and cooling PSU.
    the Silverstone 80 Plus gold (Strider S series) lasted just 9 months before it started to produce erratic voltage levels. Sent back for a replacement and that one lasted 15 months. I now have that unit's replacement but it is now a spare to my Corsir RX750.
    At least they honored their warranty...twice.
  • maxwellmelon
    http://silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=648&area=en

    they say ripple on 12 volt spec is 120mv so they don't even say themselves that its going to have a ripple under 100 which the writer of this article was expecting. why expect something that the manufacture of this psu didn't say it would do
  • Andi lim
    Too little Elco and Solid Capacitors on secondary side cause poor ripple and hol up time. Must set new standart, Platinum and Titanium Level should not exceed 50mV on all output rail.