NEC EA244UHD 24-Inch Ultra HD Monitor Review

Packaging, Physical Layout And Accessories

The EA244UHD is securely packed in a double-corrugated carton with air-bladder cushions (something we haven’t seen before). They’re designed to be easily recycled and extremely light. Despite this, they provide solid protection and should ensure the safe arrival of your new purchase.

The accessory bundle includes an IEC power cord; DisplayPort, ControlSync and USB 3.0 cables; and a printed setup guide. There’s no CD in the box; you’ll have to download the user manual from NEC’s website.

Product 360

The base and upright come attached, so no assembly is necessary. Like the other Ultra HD monitors we’ve tested, the EA244UHD has a light anti-glare layer that works well in most environments, while retaining maximum image clarity. The bezel is very thin at the top and sides, and only slightly wider at the bottom, making it a good candidate for multi-screen configurations.

The bezel controls are all touch sensitive and clearly labeled. When you operate them, icons appear on the screen to tell you their functions. Options like volume, brightness and input can be accessed without going through the OSD. The touch pads require very little pressure and can be activated by accident if you’re not careful.

The EA244UHD is fully adjustable thanks to a solidly-built stand. In addition to portrait mode, you get 25 degrees of tilt, 5.1 inches of height travel and almost 360 degrees of swivel. NEC continues to provide one of the best-made stands in the business. It moves with just the right amount of effort and there’s no play at all.

NEC monitors are not the slimmest; their side profile always looks industrial. Generous ventilation exposes the heavily shielded innards in this photo. The small input panel houses a USB port and a headphone jack.

You can see from the back that vents run the full perimeter of the power bulge. Above NEC's logo is a carrying handle, which is extremely useful. There are two 100mm VESA mounts that facilitate plenty of flexibility when using aftermarket brackets. Attached to the upright is a tube for cable management.

The EA244UHD has almost as many inputs as an HDTV. There are two each of DVI, HDMI and DisplayPort. One of the HDMI ports is MHL-compatible. Why so many? NEC lets you pipe in and display as many as four sources on-screen at once. With such high pixel density, each image can be of extremely high quality. The panel is rounded out by USB 3.0 upstream and downstream ports, ControlSync in and out and an analog audio input.

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16 comments
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  • alidan
    48 inch, i can't imagine using a 4k at any less than 48 inches.
  • LiquidAMD
    SST or MST please for 60Hz??
  • LiquidAMD
    SST or MST please for 60Hz??
  • milkod2001
    @alidan

    That's no telly, it's professional desktop monitor, could be 27 or 30'' but would probably cost another 1000 or more extra.
  • vincent67
    Agree with alidan, at this density, pixels are wasted: you don't see more as you need to scale everything up.
    And, knowing the hardware you need to drive this resolution,, I don't see any interest except for some niches.
    You need at least 44'' to exploit 4K.
  • ribald86
    @vincent67

    UHD is 2560x1440/2560x1600 - not 4k. Even if it was 4k, I don't see how you can say it is wasted.
  • ribald86
    @myself - I was incorrect - I am a dumb ass.

    QHD = 2560x1440/2560x1600
    UHD = 4k
  • ribald86
    @myself - I was incorrect - I am a dumb ass.

    QHD = 2560x1440/2560x1600
    UHD = 4k
  • atwspoon
    @ribald86
    UHD = 3840x2160
    4k = 4096x2160
  • Textfield
    The problem with these high-DPI screens is that support for these displays is lacking in many modern OS's. Yes, support is getting better, as with Windows 8.1 and its better UI scaling, but even with good support in the OS's UI, you're still at the mercy of the apps you use, and many are terrible when it comes to high DPI, with some even failing to work properly.

    Retina is only useful when your programs provide good support for it. Otherwise it's just an annoyance. As an owner of a Yoga 2 Pro (13" 3200x1800), I can speak to this. I normally run my laptop in an upscaled 1920x1080 just to keep compatability.
  • atwspoon
    @vincent67
    So what about tablets and phones using UHD or 4k in the future?
    The Pixel Chromebook looks quite pretty with its 12" screen and 2560x1700 resolution. That's a small laptop, but moving in the right direction I think!
  • eklipz330
    yeah, i cant imagine widespread pc 4k adoption until we have video cards that can run it. i mean, we're still struggling with 2560x1440 resolution. there needs to be a massive improvement in gpu power in the next year
  • vincent67
    @atwspoon
    Of course, I also found these extra pixels, above 1920*1080, for tiny screens from phones or tablets superfluous and no less wasted! Everything is scaled up so you don't see more stuff!
    This is similar to digital cameras where the resolution becomes useless passed a certain point.
  • none12345
    "Agree with alidan, at this density, pixels are wasted: you don't see more as you need to scale everything up.
    And, knowing the hardware you need to drive this resolution,, I don't see any interest except for some niches.
    You need at least 44'' to exploit 4K. "

    While true of a TV at normal viewing distance. This is complete and utter BS for a desktop monitor. My eyesight is not that great and i can easily see the pixels(if i look for them) on the 1920x1080 monitor im staring at as i type this.

    The move to 3840 cant happen soon enough. If i had a spare 1,400 id be all over this monitor. But i dont, i have to wait till the price comes down. Also wait for the refresh rate to go up, 60 is too low.

    185ppi will be hard to see unless you really try hard. But sub 100 its pretty easy to see the pixels. The desktop world has been stuck with 90-110ppi for FAR FAR too long.
  • none12345
    As for scaling, apps designed for 1980 scale perfectly to 3840, you just double everything. The the image will look identical to what you have now.

    Granted there are some issues, like the windows app notification message that tells apps when they are being scaled. And some apps ignoring this message and telling windows back that it can handle the resoultion properly when it cant. Thats an issue. But for every app that doesnt cheat like that, and just renders itself, you can scale it easily.

    Its the wierd ppi monitors that have problems scaling. You cant scale an image designed for 90ppi to 150 without screwing up the image. You can scale 90 to 180 easily and it will look perfect.

    As far as games go. Just turn down the AA setting, and you achieve the same framerate with a better image on 4k then you do on 2k. With AA on youa re already rendering at the higher pixel density, then downscaling it to be displayed. Downscaling takes processing power, turn off the AA and its the same thing only faster. AA becomes unnecessary once you increase pixel density.
  • SpankyNek
    I am interested in further explanation of the Vincent67's assertion that digital camera resolution becomes useless.

    Like none12345 mentioned above, it is totally dependent upon the intended usage of the product.

    4K computer monitors are being viewed at extremely short distances.
    If a photographer wants to produce very large prints from a digital image, resolution becomes paramount.

    So, while there is certainly a point where the cost of increasing resolution capability becomes inverse to the need of a "typical" use, that point will not be the same for someone utilizing those higher resolutions for atypical applications.

    IMO, smaller 4K displays still provide a ton of utility. Whether or not that utility is something a typical user would benefit from is largely irrelevant when one considers that a typical user is not going to be in the market for a $1300 computer monitor.