MSI Assuages Intel Skylake CPU Bending Concerns With CPU Guard 1151 Socket Brace

MSI has an answer for anyone still concerned about potentially damaging their Skylake CPUs with coolers that apply too much downward force. The company has just revealed a new bracket that will brace the corners of the CPU for higher pressure.

We recently ran a story covering the reports of bending Skylake CPUs. In it we posted statements that we received from various CPU cooler companies and Intel itself regarding the situation. The consensus from each of the companies that made a statement, with the exception of Scythe (which seems to be the only company affected) is that there is little to no danger of any CPU bending happening unless it happens during transport. MSI, it appears, wasn’t content with the majority and has a solution for others who feel the same.

MSI had already been developing the CPU GUARD 1151 as a brace for delidded CPUs. It’s designed to brace the corners of a cooling block or heatsink when cooling bare exposed CPU cores, but it can easily be used as additional support without removing the heatspreader from your processor.

MSI said the CPU GUARD 1151 can be used with Intel Xeon E3 V5, Celeron, Pentium and Core processors. The company did not say if it will support motherboards from other vendors.

Pricing and availability for the CPU GUARD 1151 have not yet been announced.

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Kevin Carbotte joined Tom’s Hardware in early 2015. He writes GPU and VR hardware reviews and contributes to the news channel in the areas of computer graphics, water cooling, VR and other immersive technology. Kevin’s personal interests include technology advancements, fast cars and collecting video games that he doesn't have time to play.

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  • thor220
    Oh would you look at that, deliding and bending CPU chips. Both stemming from Intel's ongoing cheapening effort.

    I really hope Zen crushes it. Then maybe Intel will actually work on improving their processors and not focusing on going as cheap as possible.

    Anyone want to start an AMD kickstarter? They could really use the R&D money.
  • NightLight
    Quote:
    Oh would you look at that, deliding and bending CPU chips. Both stemming from Intel's ongoing cheapening effort. I really hope Zen crushes it. Then maybe Intel will actually work on improving their processors and not focusing on going as cheap as possible. Anyone want to start an AMD kickstarter? They could really use the R&D money.


    Wow, one negative intel post, and a 3rd party problem no less, and you are all over intel, you must really hate them! If amd could, they would.
  • Valantar
    Jeez, can we stop with the meaningless arguing? Intel has had a huge lead in CPU perf for years now, and no, it's not a coincidence. At the same time, CPU performance hasn't increased much during this time either. Has their lead led them to be slightly lazy? Possibly. It's impossible to speculate whether this is true or not. All we know for sure is that Intel has been more focused for the last four generations or so on reducing power consumption than increasing raw power. And, we should add, this has caused them to more or less own the entire laptop market (the biggest consumer PC market), while keeping their lead in desktops and dominating the server market. Their architectures scale remarkably well (4-165W? That's a huge range!).

    Is the reason for thinning the Skylake PCB cost cutting? Possibly. It's hard to argue that it's not at least part of the logic behind the decision. Does it matter? No. As we've seen, with ~99% of all cooling solutions, it makes no difference. I'd bet the thinking behind it is along the lines of "Can we make the PCB thinner without any negative consequences? *Testing* Sure, seems like it. Let's do it!" After all, there is absolutely no logic in wasting materials, no matter the scale.

    Did they screw this up? Possibly. Should they have tested this more thoroughly? Sure. Has it yet affected any end users, at all? Not that I've heard of. That'd be a class action suit waiting to happen.

    The use of a subpar TIM is another matter entirely. But still one that doesn't matter to 90%+ of users.