The Core i7-8086K Review: 40 Years Of x86

Silicon Lottery, Overclocking & Test Setup

Alternately, Silicon Lottery procures batches of processors and delids them to replace Intel's thermal paste with liquid metal Thermal Grizzly Condoctonaut. According to the company, this reduces operating temperatures by 15°C to 25°C, depending on the workload. The improved thermal transfer material helps facilitate more aggressive overclocks. Silicon Lottery sells the modified processors at a premium price, and with a one-year warranty (rather than Intel's standard three-year coverage).

Core i7-8700K - December 2017
Core i7-8700K - June 2018
Clock
Vcore
AVX2
Percentile
Clock
Vcore
AVX2
Percentile
4.9 GHz
1.387
-2
Top 99%
4.9 GHz
1.385
-2
Top 99%
5.0 GHz
1.4
-2
Top 72%
5.0 GHz
1.4
-2
Top 86%
5.1 GHz
1.412
-2
Top 43%
5.1 GHz
1.41
-2
Top 50%
5.2 GHz
1.425
-2
Top 16%
5.2 GHz
1.425
-2
Top 17%
5.3 GHz
1.437
-2
Top 3%
5.3 GHz
-
-
-

Silicon Lottery compiles statistics about the samples it modifies and shares them publicly, giving us a reasonable gauge of what's coming out of Intel's foundries. Some enthusiasts speculate that reserving the highest-quality silicon for Core i7-8086K would hurt the chances of scoring a higher-clocking -8700K. But as we can see, the percentage of -8700Ks able to hit anywhere from 5 to 5.2 GHz actually increased during the period of time we would have expected Intel to set aside top-binned dies for its -8086K. Then again, it looks like samples able to hit 5.3 GHz disappeared entirely, possibly representing those precious -8086K-capable dies.

Core i7-8086K - June 2018
Clock
Vcore
AVX2
Percentile
5.0 GHz
1.4
-2
Top 100%
5.1 GHz
1.41
-2
Top 92%
5.2 GHz
1.425
-2
Top 60%
5.3 GHz
1.435
-2
Top 14%

Silicon Lottery also shares statistics on the Core i7-8068K, and its probability of receiving top silicon is markedly better than what we see from the latest round of Core i7-8700K data. Nearly all of the company's -8086Ks reach 5 GHz, and the top 14% are capable of reaching 5.3 GHz.

Our own Core i7-8086K achieved 5.1 GHz with a 1.35V Vcore and default load line calibration settings. In addition, we adjusted our AVX offset by -1 and saw a peak temperature of 86°C during AVX-heavy workloads using Corsair's beefy H115i closed-loop cooler. Although we successfully dialed in DDR4-3466 rates with 14-14-14-24 timings, we feel we could have pushed even higher with more time for tuning.

Instead of splurging on a Core i7-8086K, you could always purchase a modified Core i7-8700K from Silicon Lottery capable of hitting the same 5.1 GHz that we achieved. Unfortunately, those models sell for $479, making the -8086K's $425 price tag attractive in comparison. If you're chasing the highest overclock possible, the company does sell a Core i7-8086K capable of 5.3 GHz for $849. As with all Silicon Lottery chips, however, you lose two years of warranty coverage in the exchange. 

Comparison Products

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Test Systems

Like many other vendors, MSI motherboards feature a default Enhanced Turbo feature that allows the processor to run at its maximum Turbo Boost bin on all cores, at all times. For the Core i7-8086K, you're looking at 5 GHz across all six cores.

This setting modifies the CPU's clock rate and voltage to deliver higher performance, which is basically factory-sanctioned overclocking. Again, MSI enables it by default in the BIOS, similar to most of the competition. But performance, power consumption, and heat are all affected when it's on. We manually disable the feature for our stock CPU testing to best reflect Intel's specifications.

Test System & Configuration
Hardware

AMD Socket AM4 (400-Series)
AMD Ryzen 7 2700, Ryzen 7 2700X, Ryzen 5 2600X, Ryzen 5 2600
MSI X470 Gaming M7 AC
2x 8GB G.Skill FlareX DDR4-3200 @ DDR4-2933, DDR4-3466

Intel LGA 1151 (Z370):
Intel Core i7-8086K, Core i7-8700K, Core i5-8600K, Core i5-8400, Core i7-8700
MSI Z370 Gaming Pro Carbon AC
2x 8GB G.Skill FlareX DDR4-3200 @ DDR4-2400, DDR4-2667, DDR4-3466

All
EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FE
1TB Samsung PM863
SilverStone ST1500-TI, 1500W
Windows 10 Creators Update Version 1703 - All Spectre and Meltdown mitigations
Cooling
Corsair H115i
Intel stock thermal solution (Core i7-8700)

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This thread is closed for comments
41 comments
    Your comment
  • AgentLozen
    Cons:
    -No bundled cooler

    You're saying that if Intel paired their little aluminum heatsink with this CPU you would have been more satisfied with this product?

    I've never heard of this silicon lottery place before. That's neat stuff.
  • Yuka
    I'm going to be unfair, but not too much:

    - We doing something for the 40th anniversary? -> Yes.
    - What do we sell for the 40th anniversary? -> A re-branded 8700K.
    - What do we include to make it more expensive? -> A letter from the CEO we most definitely won't be firing in the upcoming weeks! And a weird bottle with coffee beans in it (it seems?).
    - Do we bother in making it special (metal solder, bundled CLC, etc...) or just pick a couple golden sample 8700Ks? -> Don't bother, shrinks our profit; we don't care about the anniversary or making this special, really.

    Too much cynical thought process there?

    Cheers! :P
  • PaulAlcorn
    496490 said:
    Cons: -No bundled cooler You're saying that if Intel paired their little aluminum heatsink with this CPU you would have been more satisfied with this product? I've never heard of this silicon lottery place before. That's neat stuff.


    Touché
    ;)
  • mac_angel
    why is it that internet news media no longer uses proof readers or editors?
  • ubercake
    I like the article and the page two comparison with the old 8086.
  • ingtar33
    so Intel releases 8000 binned cpus for a $100 markup over their basic cpu, plus some crap, however, this release is by lottery only (as in only the lotto winners have permission to buy this chip), and THG does a review?

    seriously?
  • mister g
    " But if you go the Silicon Lottery route, expect to pay even more than a brand new Core i7-8086K costs and lose two years of warranty coverage."

    I thought Intel CPUs usually come with a 3 year warranty?
  • Math Geek
    1027081 said:
    this release is by lottery only (as in only the lotto winners have permission to buy this chip), and THG does a review? seriously?


    think you missed how it went. they did a drawing to give away a bunch of these chips but they also made the rest available for purchase through the normal routs. no lottery there, just have to be quick on the draw and buy one before they sell out. Tom's bought thier's the same way any of us could have since intel did not send out press samples of it. it's a valid product for sale like any other they review.
  • g-unit1111
    496490 said:
    Cons: -No bundled cooler You're saying that if Intel paired their little aluminum heatsink with this CPU you would have been more satisfied with this product? I've never heard of this silicon lottery place before. That's neat stuff.


    Yeah I noticed that too. Intel hasn't been bundling coolers with its' high end CPUs since the X79 days. I honestly wouldn't count this as a hit against it.
  • Krazie_Ivan
    and lets check in with Paul on those 8086k temps...

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/54/23/5a/54235a5fac7cee9c208e0838115f1752.jpg
  • jimmysmitty
    73949 said:
    I'm going to be unfair, but not too much: - We doing something for the 40th anniversary? -> Yes. - What do we sell for the 40th anniversary? -> A re-branded 8700K. - What do we include to make it more expensive? -> A letter from the CEO we most definitely won't be firing in the upcoming weeks! And a weird bottle with coffee beans in it (it seems?). - Do we bother in making it special (metal solder, bundled CLC, etc...) or just pick a couple golden sample 8700Ks? -> Don't bother, shrinks our profit; we don't care about the anniversary or making this special, really. Too much cynical thought process there? Cheers! :P


    I haven't seen many companies do much more for an anniversary version of their product. For example, the 50th anniversary Mustang in 2015 was just a Mustang GT with the Performance Pack but came in two special colors (Kona Blue and Wimbeldon White) and had the badging. They did a limited run of 1964 of those. However it didn't perform any better than a 2015 GT with the Performance Package.

    I think celebrating their beginnings is neat. Some people love this stuff. Let them enjoy it.
  • PaulAlcorn
    349598 said:
    " But if you go the Silicon Lottery route, expect to pay even more than a brand new Core i7-8086K costs and lose two years of warranty coverage." I thought Intel CPUs usually come with a 3 year warranty?


    Yup. Intel gives you a three-year warranty, while Silicon Lottery gives you a one-year warranty. So, you lose two years of coverage if you buy a chip from Silicon Lottery.
  • Yuka
    149725 said:
    73949 said:
    I'm going to be unfair, but not too much: - We doing something for the 40th anniversary? -> Yes. - What do we sell for the 40th anniversary? -> A re-branded 8700K. - What do we include to make it more expensive? -> A letter from the CEO we most definitely won't be firing in the upcoming weeks! And a weird bottle with coffee beans in it (it seems?). - Do we bother in making it special (metal solder, bundled CLC, etc...) or just pick a couple golden sample 8700Ks? -> Don't bother, shrinks our profit; we don't care about the anniversary or making this special, really. Too much cynical thought process there? Cheers! :P
    I haven't seen many companies do much more for an anniversary version of their product. For example, the 50th anniversary Mustang in 2015 was just a Mustang GT with the Performance Pack but came in two special colors (Kona Blue and Wimbeldon White) and had the badging. They did a limited run of 1964 of those. However it didn't perform any better than a 2015 GT with the Performance Package. I think celebrating their beginnings is neat. Some people love this stuff. Let them enjoy it.


    They usually include some performance packages factory cars don't get. Unfortunately, the analogy falls a bit short, since here you're basically comparing the Shelby Mustang of the line up to the anniversary edition, which is a Shelby Mustang in another color. Not even special wheels, interior or markings; just a new badge and a higher price point.

    But yes, I do agree at least they did *something* to "celebrate". I just find it amazing how they "celebrate" and not lose money doing it (or pass it as a marketing cost).

    Cheers!
  • jdlech2
    TBH, I think anyone who even opens the package is nuts. It's like breaking the plastic on that vinyl album you know is going to be history, or opening the plastic bag on that one comic book you know is going to be worth thousands, someday. These are collectors items - they're valued not for their performance, but for their collectibility. 25 years from now, museums are going to want them, collectors are going to bid for them. "Mint condition" is going to be worth something.
  • Giroro
    Come on, guys. Intel went through all that effort to send you some coffee in the press kit, so the least you could do is throw it into a lake.
  • AgentLozen
    Giroro said:
    Come on, guys. Intel went through all that effort to send you some coffee in the press kit, so the least you could do is throw it into a lake.


    Well what's the point in doing that? All that's gonna happen is some coffee is going to get in that lake.
  • jimmysmitty
    73949 said:
    149725 said:
    73949 said:
    I'm going to be unfair, but not too much: - We doing something for the 40th anniversary? -> Yes. - What do we sell for the 40th anniversary? -> A re-branded 8700K. - What do we include to make it more expensive? -> A letter from the CEO we most definitely won't be firing in the upcoming weeks! And a weird bottle with coffee beans in it (it seems?). - Do we bother in making it special (metal solder, bundled CLC, etc...) or just pick a couple golden sample 8700Ks? -> Don't bother, shrinks our profit; we don't care about the anniversary or making this special, really. Too much cynical thought process there? Cheers! :P
    I haven't seen many companies do much more for an anniversary version of their product. For example, the 50th anniversary Mustang in 2015 was just a Mustang GT with the Performance Pack but came in two special colors (Kona Blue and Wimbeldon White) and had the badging. They did a limited run of 1964 of those. However it didn't perform any better than a 2015 GT with the Performance Package. I think celebrating their beginnings is neat. Some people love this stuff. Let them enjoy it.
    They usually include some performance packages factory cars don't get. Unfortunately, the analogy falls a bit short, since here you're basically comparing the Shelby Mustang of the line up to the anniversary edition, which is a Shelby Mustang in another color. Not even special wheels, interior or markings; just a new badge and a higher price point. But yes, I do agree at least they did *something* to "celebrate". I just find it amazing how they "celebrate" and not lose money doing it (or pass it as a marketing cost). Cheers!


    No the 2015 50th anniversary Mustang. Not the 50th anniversary Cobra Jet (which looks insane) of which they are only pushing 68 out and will be unique in that its a 5.2l cross plane Coyote V8 super charged. The 2015 50th anniversary of the original Mustang was just a 2015 GT with special colors and badging nothing more.

    I said it is often the same as what Intel does. Normally just aesthetic changes or badging or even a special this year and trim only color.

    People should be allowed to celebrate and enjoy it. Its not meant for everyone just those that enjoy it.
  • Gam3r01
    Now the question is, would the winners of the giveaway be getting just the processor, or the whole spread in the first picture?
  • cangelini
    169108 said:
    why is it that internet news media no longer uses proof readers or editors?


    Editor checking in. What issues did you spot? Thanks!
    Chris
  • cryoburner
    1920539 said:
    Pros: Rare moments of 5 GHz operation are exciting

    A bit like spotting bigfoot in the wild? What's the point of giving the processor a slightly higher boost clock on a single core when that doesn't actually translate to better performance in real-world scenarios? Considering that these processors are capable of overclocking to 5GHz, I'm sure they could have given it higher multi-core boost clocks as well, even if they were just increased by 100MHz over the 8700K. The resulting performance difference would still be indistinguishable, but at least it could be measured.

    1920539 said:
    But in an effort to maintain a 95W thermal design power rating, Intel only tweaked this chip's base and single-core clock rates.

    But didn't you state in the 8700 review posted just the other day that...

    1920539 said:
    You see, Intel's thermal design power specification applies to the CPU's base frequency. But its processors exceed that rating when they jump to higher Turbo Boost bins.

    Honestly, I think they just pull numbers out of a hat when specifying their TDPs.

    About the only "Pro" this processor has is that overclockers can get a chip that's been binned for about 100Mhz higher clocks on average. However, there's still no guarantee that you'll get a chip that clocks better, it just increases one's odds. Going by Silicon Lottery's data, there's still a chance of getting an 8086K that won't be able to exceed 5GHz.

    And what's with these other "Pros"? Fastest gaming processor? Even with a high-end graphics card at 1080p, frame rates were practically identical to an 8700K, and even that processor's performance in today's games is practically indistinguishable from a number of lower-priced options. Why even mention gaming performance in the review summary? Anyone building a gaming system would be better off putting that extra $75+ toward other components that have some actual performance benefit.

    And will the 8086K really end up a collector's item? I somehow doubt this processor will retain all that much of its value in the long term. It's not so much a piece of history as it is a marketing gimmick to extract more profit out of 8700Ks that can potentially clock a bit higher. And from a performance standpoint, the 8086K will undoubtedly be surpassed by the 9th-gen Core processors that should be launching within the next few months or so.
  • feelinfroggy777
    The only people that I have seen buy this chip is tech reviewers because Intel made so few that they did not send any review copies out.

    I just cant imagine any regular Joe buying this thing.
  • PaulAlcorn
    582021 said:
    1920539 said:
    <snip>
    1920539 said:
    But in an effort to maintain a 95W thermal design power rating, Intel only tweaked this chip's base and single-core clock rates.
    But didn't you state in the 8700 review posted just the other day that...
    1920539 said:
    You see, Intel's thermal design power specification applies to the CPU's base frequency. But its processors exceed that rating when they jump to higher Turbo Boost bins.
    Honestly, I think they just pull numbers out of a hat when specifying their TDPs. <snip>.


    Good catch, as we pointed out in the past, the TDP is based on the base frequency only. Correction made.
  • jeffrey.egan
    What if I got one for free in the sweepstakes? Is it worth it then? :D

    Seriously should I sell it and use my 8700k?
  • Gam3r01
    2728635 said:
    What if I got one for free in the sweepstakes? Is it worth it then? :D Seriously should I sell it and use my 8700k?


    In your case, yes. Sell it and put the money to something else.
    I also won one, but I am using a 4590, so I will happily use it.