HP Z27x Dreamcolor Professional Display Review

Results: Viewing Angles, Uniformity, Pixel Response And Input Lag

To learn how we measure screen uniformity, please click here.

Viewing Angles

Our photos look similar to other GB-r-LED monitors we’ve seen with one important difference. Even though the same red color shift exists in the vertical plane, shadow detail is superior. If you check out photos of the NEC PA272W, you’ll see that the darkest steps are more washed out than they are here. HP’s custom grid polarizer definitely has a visible benefit.

Screen Uniformity: Luminance

HP specifically chose not to use any uniformity compensation because of its negative effect on contrast and, to a lesser degree, color. Obviously it’s not missed on our review sample. A black field number below 10 percent means there are no visible hotspots on the screen. Combined with the Z27x’s low black level, it looks perfect to our eyes.

Here’s the white field measurement:

While this isn't the best result we’ve recorded, it is still perfect to the naked eye. The NEC and BenQ screens are represented with their uniformity compensation turned on. HP sees no need for the feature, and we agree with it.

Screen Uniformity: Color

The Z27x’s error of 3.54 Delta E is mainly caused by a barely perceptible green shift in the upper-right corner of the screen. It’s impossible to see in actual content and another sample might measure differently. Out of all the tests in our benchmark suite, it’s the only result we could call less-than-stellar.

Pixel Response And Input Lag

Please click here to read up on our pixel response and input lag testing procedures.

The Z27x is an AH-IPS screen and its draw time of 25 milliseconds confirms this. There are no blur-reduction options available, though you do get an overdrive setting. It helps reduce motion blur, but doesn’t reduce the measured response time. With typical video content, there are no issues. Regardless, we don’t expect many hardcore gamers to add a monitor like this to their rig.

Here are the lag results:

Input lag is also about average for a 60 Hz IPS display. Most people could game on the Z27x without issue. But if you’re looking for maximum frame rates and super-fast response, there are better alternatives out there.

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  • DoDidDont
    I have 3x Z24x, very impressed with them so far for compositing and 3d work. Would have gone with 3x Z27x but simply don’t have the desk space or room for a bigger desk. My only worry is if they have the same problem as the older ZR24w’s they replaced, in that the whites go yellowish and make greys have a tint of brown after only one or two years of use. Always had a dark grey desktop, and in 3ds max everything is set to Dark GUI, and always been careful not to leave monitors on for long periods with the same image so no idea why the older ZR24w’s go yellowish after a while. Hopefully this problem has been fixed in the new line-up. But at the Mo, highly recommend these monitors, amazing quality for the price if you are into DCC.
  • laststop311
    .29 is not a good black level really. Hopefully oleds will displace the need for these monitors soon, only a matter of time
  • somebodyspecial
    hopefully 1600p will displace 1440p soon ;) I'm tired of scrolling up/down so much on web pages. Gaming doesn't get any better wide either, and if I want that I'll use more than one monitor to get the best of both worlds (taller for the web, and wider for games if desired).
  • laststop311
    925801 said:
    hopefully 1600p will displace 1440p soon ;) I'm tired of scrolling up/down so much on web pages. Gaming doesn't get any better wide either, and if I want that I'll use more than one monitor to get the best of both worlds (taller for the web, and wider for games if desired).


    Agree 100% I had a 24" 1920x1080 Cheapo TN monitor and then I found a Dell u3014 on craigslist and jewed the guy down to 575 for it. The bezel was a little scuffed up but the screen was flawless was a hell of a deal and man once you are used to 16:10 you cant go back to 16:9 it feels claustrophobic.

    I am not a graphics professional though. But I fear since 16:10 is more a professional monitor we will never see a gaming monitor with 120hz and g sync in 16:10. I just can't bring myself to downgrade to a 27" asus rog swift even tho i really could use the gaming features. I'm probably just going to hold onto this dell until 120hz 3840x2160 rog swift type monitor is released at 30-34 inches. I don't think there is much hope in 16:10 4k monitors, never seen one yet 3840 x 2400 i believe.
  • Draven35
    When I was at HP in Fort Collins for the new Z Workstation launch, I had an opportunity (several opportunities, really) to chat with Greg Staten, the HP DreamColor Solution Architect. He's really enthusiastic about his work and was really excited that this review was coming!
  • rajubaju
    Complaints about lack of CMS in OSD... I couldn't agree with them more. Totally unacceptable... Especially when you know; z24x provides that possibility (like every other, wide gamut, monitor on the market; nec pa272w, dell u2713h, asus pa279q, vp2772, lg 27ea83-D etc.) In the z24x manual, we can read: "the User (User Preset) adjustable color settings for customers who do not have calibration equipment". What is the difference? with z27x - price i guess - you pay more, you get less! ;) I understand that now, when I buy z27x, I must buy a colorimeter (HP ofc)... even if I do not need ideal color accuracy... and i only want adjust monitor (RGB primaries) for my preferences. Not a chance! I hope that Greg Staten read this and add User preset, like in z24x, to Z27x... About saturation, 6 color adjustment, etc. I don't even dream; It would be a miracle! ;)