G.Skill Made a Display Box for Your RGB Memory

Photo Source: G.SkillPhoto Source: G.Skill

It's no secret that people like to show off their components--especially if those parts are illuminated by a bunch of RGB LEDs. That's why so many cases now include tempered glass panels. G.Skill announced the logical next step in that progression of technological exhibitionism with the Trident Z Royal Display Box, which is quite literally a box whose sole purpose is to show off the company's Trident Z Royal and Trident Z RGB memory kits.

We're going to be honest: we aren't 100 percent sure G.Skill isn't trolling us with the Trident Z Royal Display Box. In the kindest possible way, not only is the product itself ludicrous, but the lead image looks like something you'd find in a 15-year-old's graphic design portfolio. We've reached out to G.Skill to confirm that the Trident Z Royal Display Box isn't a much-delayed April Fools' joke and get more information about it if it's legitimate.

For now, we'll proceed with the assumption that the Trident Z Royal Display Box is a real thing people will be able to spend their money on. That already seems to be the case in some parts of the world: a Taiwan-based retailer called PChome Online currently lists the box at 1,600 yuan; that's roughly $238. For reference, Trident Z Royal kits start at $170 and Trident Z RGB at $135, and the Trident Z Royal Display Box can fit two kits.

Photo Source: G.SkillPhoto Source: G.Skill

G.Skill was also careful to note that the Trident Z Royal Display Box "lets you show off the default lighting effect of your RGB memory kit (up to 4 modules) by simply connecting the USB-to-micro-USB cable to any USB port or phone charger." That means two things: first that the memory inside the box can't actually be used for any meaningful purpose, and second that roughly $500 won't even buy the option to control the lighting.

There is some good news, though, which is that G.Skill will include a microfiber cloth and USB cable with each Trident Z Royal Display Box. That way this gleaming monument to form over function will be easier to clean and that spending hundreds of dollars to show off unusable memory won't incur the added cost of a USB cable. That would've been the only possible deal-breaker for someone thinking about buying this product, right?