Dell UP2715K 27-inch 5K Monitor Review

Conclusion

There's no question that regardless of the benchmark results, the UP2715K delivers a gorgeous picture. Even the most sharp-eyed user will be unable to see individual pixels at any viewing distance. When combined with high-quality content, it's hard to imagine things looking any smoother.

Of course with any premium product, especially one that includes a factory calibration, expectations for accuracy are high. The UP2715K delivers on that score but it's not quite as easy as simply plugging it in and turning it on. Even though the included data sheet shows impressive results for the preset Adobe RGB and sRGB modes, we found some flaws that weren't accounted for in Dell's tests. The green primary exhibits behavior that would be classified as unusual if it weren't identical to what we observed in the HP Z27q.

Dell however provides an easy fix for those inconsistencies with included software. After testing every possible calibration avenue, that turned out to be the easiest way to go and it provided by far the best performance. While we feel out-of-box accuracy is lacking, the monitor has the potential to be perfect and unlocking that potential doesn't require too much work.

If you're just looking for a super-saturated pixel-free image however, the UP2715K is more than fine. With its wider-than-Adobe color gamut you'll see deep reds, emerald greens and rich royal blues in pretty much any content. That approach to image fidelity is something we also saw from the Philips 288P6 quantum-dot monitor. It's not necessarily to standard but it does make the screen burst with bold and vivid color. And that is what many users seek after all.

What we'd like to see improved besides out-of-box accuracy is contrast. IPS has become the go-to standard for premium screens but our tests have shown the clear black-level superiority of vertical-alignment (VA) panels. Imagine adding the super-wide color gamut and 218ppi density of this screen to the 3000:1 contrast of a VA monitor. Now that would be something spectacular! Of course so would a desktop OLED panel and Dell has already shown us one so it's safe to say the future of flat panels is looking pretty good.

Since the UP2715K does plenty of things right and can easily be tweaked to perfection, we think it's an ideal choice for professionals who want to pack as many pixels as they can into a 27-inch screen. Dell calls the line Ultra Sharp and this new panel definitely earns that label. For superb performance and a stunning image, we're giving it our Tom's Hardware Editor Approved Award.

MORE: Best Computer Monitors
MORE: Display Calibration 101

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MORE: All Monitor Content

Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware, covering Monitors.

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19 comments
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  • Logen_
    On the specifications chart, it says that the panel is AMVA, but a little below the chart, it's mentioned that it's an IPS panel instead. Going by the conclusion and contrast ratio, definitely IPS. Also, 3 year warranty, that's.... so little for something that clearly deserves a 5 year or more, in my opinion.
  • ceberle
    Quote:
    On the specifications chart, it says that the panel is AMVA, but a little below the chart, it's mentioned that it's an IPS panel instead. Going by the conclusion and contrast ratio, definitely IPS. Also, 3 year warranty, that's.... so little for something that clearly deserves a 5 year or more, in my opinion.


    It is indeed AH-IPS not AMVA. Thanks for pointing out our error.

    -Christian-
  • huilun02
    Oh look its a retina display with retina pricetag
  • Jeff_53
    Why isn't the MSRP on the first or last page? My interest in the product and features is directly tied to it's price.
  • apertotes
    That contrast... ugh! For 99% of users, contrast is much more important than color fidelity.
  • theusual
    How about a test of the DELL S2716DG? Especiall vs the ASUS ROG PG279Q.
  • theusual
    Quote:
    How about a test of the DELL S2716DG? Especiall vs the ASUS ROG PG279Q.

    Never mind. That would be TN vs IPS. You could compare it to the PG278Q though.
  • CBender
    + for the price thing. It is absolutely irritating. Hope you guys fix this.
  • PellehDin
    If they fix the price issue - and the current price is about $1,500 and up - you might just skip the article, which they don't want.
  • CBender
    I don't read the review articles just because of that. I am going to read a full review for a product not that I can't afford, but a product that I consider it be way overpriced (not for this particular review)
  • TallestJon96
    I know I'm a gamer who's out of place in a professional work monitor article, but between the low response time, and you statement that you could play at 40fps, id love to see an article about gaming at 5k, particularly with titan x vs 980 ti benches
  • cats_Paw
    Well, I guess we needed higher resolution to keep "can it run crysis" alive.
  • It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.
  • Uri___Pisarev
    Quote:
    If they fix the price issue - and the current price is about $1,500 and up - you might just skip the article, which they don't want.



    I have a Dell U3415W, a 34 inch Ultrawide. Price on it was also $1.5K and it did not move, but during the holiday season it fell to $700.

    So if you are interested in a product don't just give up because you can't afford it, it can easily fall into your price range as long as you have reasonable expectations.
  • Uri___Pisarev
    Quote:
    It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.


    I had a 24 inch monitor and switched to a 32 inch TV and later to a 34 inch monitor.

    I have to say, you can never go back in size ever again. I would not even look at 27 inch.
  • mrmez
    Quote:
    It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.


    Maybe if you've got poor eyesight, just want to game or have a sub 25" panel.
    I switched from 1440 to 5k ~18 months ago (both 27"), and the difference is amazing.
    Remember this is a pro grade screen for pro users. What matters to them is colour range and accuracy. Refresh rate means almost nothing.
  • lip008
    At $1500 I would just buy a refurbished iMac. I know this monitor will outlast the hardware within the iMac. Others may want to run a machine that is more capable than an iMac, but it's interesting to me how an AIO can sometimes be the same price or cheaper than just the monitor. The 5k iMac maxes out at 4k running Windows the last time I checked though.
  • zodiacfml
    Something's amiss. How is it possible to achieve 100 percent Adobe RGB while just using W-LED backlighting?
  • zodiacfml
    Never mind. The capability seems pretty standard on 5K displays.

    Quote:
    Something's amiss. How is it possible to achieve 100 percent Adobe RGB while just using W-LED backlighting?