Dell UP2715K 27-inch 5K Monitor Review

Brightness And Contrast

To read about our monitor tests in-depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test Monitors and TVs.  Brightness and Contrast testing is covered on page two.

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Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

There's only one other 5K display currently on the market, HP's Z27q, and it's included in our comparison today. The remaining monitors are Ultra HD IPS, VA and IGZO panels. We have the ViewSonic VP2780-4K, NEC's EA244UHD and PA322UHD, and Philips' BDM4065UC. All are premium products, except for the Philips monitor, which is an impressive value and our current contrast record-holder.

The UP2715K easily beats its claimed peak brightness of 350cd/m2. There is more than enough light for any task and it would probably work well outdoors, though the shiny screen coating could hamper that a little.

It's almost unfair to include the Philips and its VA panel in this comparison because of its super-low black levels. The Dell is mid-pack with the rest at a respectable .3561cd/m2.

Contrast in the default Color Temp mode is pretty good at 1014.1:1. This is good performance for an IPS panel and visually indistinguishable from all but the Philips display.

Uncalibrated – Minimum Backlight Level

The backlight drops to a low 42.7606cd/m2 at its minimum setting. 50cd/m2 can be achieved by turning the 100-step Brightness slider up to 21.

The black level stays in the same place relative to the other displays. It looks like the UP2715K has consistent contrast throughout its brightness range.

Minimum contrast is still above 1000:1 and moves the Dell up one spot in the results. It should be noted that all the above tests were performed in Color Temp mode. The Adobe and sRGB presets, which we recommend, have lower contrast at just under 800:1. They are more color-accurate though as you'll see later.

After Calibration To 200cd/m2

We performed the calibrated contrast tests using the UP2715K's Custom mode. That gave us great grayscale tracking, fair color gamut results and a slight increase in black levels; enough to send it to last place by a small margin.

Calibration has a negative impact on contrast but we think the increase in accuracy is worth the sacrifice. The picture still looks great to us, thanks to its incredible sharpness and a complete lack of visible pixel structure.

ANSI Contrast Ratio

Our sample showed a little extra brightness in the corners, which accounts for the drop in ANSI contrast. This isn't a deal-breaker by any stretch and other examples would measure differently than ours. 615:1 is slightly below average for the IPS panels we've tested.

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19 comments
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  • Logen_
    On the specifications chart, it says that the panel is AMVA, but a little below the chart, it's mentioned that it's an IPS panel instead. Going by the conclusion and contrast ratio, definitely IPS. Also, 3 year warranty, that's.... so little for something that clearly deserves a 5 year or more, in my opinion.
  • ceberle
    Quote:
    On the specifications chart, it says that the panel is AMVA, but a little below the chart, it's mentioned that it's an IPS panel instead. Going by the conclusion and contrast ratio, definitely IPS. Also, 3 year warranty, that's.... so little for something that clearly deserves a 5 year or more, in my opinion.


    It is indeed AH-IPS not AMVA. Thanks for pointing out our error.

    -Christian-
  • huilun02
    Oh look its a retina display with retina pricetag
  • Jeff_53
    Why isn't the MSRP on the first or last page? My interest in the product and features is directly tied to it's price.
  • apertotes
    That contrast... ugh! For 99% of users, contrast is much more important than color fidelity.
  • theusual
    How about a test of the DELL S2716DG? Especiall vs the ASUS ROG PG279Q.
  • theusual
    Quote:
    How about a test of the DELL S2716DG? Especiall vs the ASUS ROG PG279Q.

    Never mind. That would be TN vs IPS. You could compare it to the PG278Q though.
  • CBender
    + for the price thing. It is absolutely irritating. Hope you guys fix this.
  • PellehDin
    If they fix the price issue - and the current price is about $1,500 and up - you might just skip the article, which they don't want.
  • CBender
    I don't read the review articles just because of that. I am going to read a full review for a product not that I can't afford, but a product that I consider it be way overpriced (not for this particular review)
  • TallestJon96
    I know I'm a gamer who's out of place in a professional work monitor article, but between the low response time, and you statement that you could play at 40fps, id love to see an article about gaming at 5k, particularly with titan x vs 980 ti benches
  • cats_Paw
    Well, I guess we needed higher resolution to keep "can it run crysis" alive.
  • It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.
  • Uri___Pisarev
    Quote:
    If they fix the price issue - and the current price is about $1,500 and up - you might just skip the article, which they don't want.



    I have a Dell U3415W, a 34 inch Ultrawide. Price on it was also $1.5K and it did not move, but during the holiday season it fell to $700.

    So if you are interested in a product don't just give up because you can't afford it, it can easily fall into your price range as long as you have reasonable expectations.
  • Uri___Pisarev
    Quote:
    It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.


    I had a 24 inch monitor and switched to a 32 inch TV and later to a 34 inch monitor.

    I have to say, you can never go back in size ever again. I would not even look at 27 inch.
  • mrmez
    Quote:
    It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.


    Maybe if you've got poor eyesight, just want to game or have a sub 25" panel.
    I switched from 1440 to 5k ~18 months ago (both 27"), and the difference is amazing.
    Remember this is a pro grade screen for pro users. What matters to them is colour range and accuracy. Refresh rate means almost nothing.
  • lip008
    At $1500 I would just buy a refurbished iMac. I know this monitor will outlast the hardware within the iMac. Others may want to run a machine that is more capable than an iMac, but it's interesting to me how an AIO can sometimes be the same price or cheaper than just the monitor. The 5k iMac maxes out at 4k running Windows the last time I checked though.
  • zodiacfml
    Something's amiss. How is it possible to achieve 100 percent Adobe RGB while just using W-LED backlighting?
  • zodiacfml
    Never mind. The capability seems pretty standard on 5K displays.

    Quote:
    Something's amiss. How is it possible to achieve 100 percent Adobe RGB while just using W-LED backlighting?