Cooler Master V750 PSU Review

Transient Response Tests

Advanced Transient Response Tests

For details on our transient response testing, please click here.

In these tests, we monitored the response of the PSU in two different scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V and 0.5A at 5VSB) was applied to the PSU for 200ms while the PSU was working at 20 percent load. In the second scenario, the PSU was hit by the same transient load while operating at 50 percent load. In both tests, we used our oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should have remained within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These tests are crucial because they simulate the transient loads a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array or an instant 100 percent load of CPU/GPUs). We call these tests "Advanced Transient Response Tests," and they are designed to be very tough to master, especially for a PSU with a capacity of less than 500W.  

Advanced Transient Response at 20 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.123V12.026V0.80%Pass
5V5.023V4.904V2.37%Pass
3.3V3.327V3.194V4.00%Pass
5VSB5.001V4.943V1.16%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.066V11.950V0.96%Pass
5V4.992V4.879V2.26%Pass
3.3V3.296V3.174V3.70%Pass
5VSB4.964V4.926V0.77%Pass

We typically like to see better performance in these tests, especially on the +12V rail. A good 750W platform usually registers close to 0.5 percent deviation during these tests. However, in this case, the deviations were well above that. On the 5V and 5VSB rails, performance was better. Meanwhile, the 3.3V rail performed poorly.

Here are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing:

Transient Response At 20 Percent Load

Transient Response At 50 Percent Load

Turn-On Transient Tests

In the next set of tests, we measured the response of the PSU in simpler transient load scenarios—during the PSU's power-on phase.

For the first measurement, we turned off the PSU, dialed in the maximum current the 5VSB could output and switched on the PSU. In the second test, we dialed the maximum load the +12V could handle and started the PSU while it was in standby mode. In the last test, while the PSU was completely switched off (we cut off the power or switched off the PSU by flipping its on/off switch), we dialed the maximum load the +12V rail could handle before switching on the PSU from the loader and restoring the power. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V, and 5.5V for 5V).    

The 5VSB and +12V rails did fine, since the voltage overshoot during the last test was pretty smooth and not enough to spoil the good overall performance.

This thread is closed for comments
7 comments
    Your comment
  • Nuckles_56
    I couldn't see it mentioned, but could any of the other cables be plugged in where they shouldn't be?
  • Giannis Karagiannis
    No, you can't connect it wrong even if you wanted too
  • Giannis Karagiannis
    But then again with a wire cutter and a little bit of insulating tape everything is possible... :P
  • Gam3r01
    I think TH reviews should take a bit from Jonnyguru or similar and include a point scale at the end. Sure listing the pros and cons with a verdict is enough in most cases, but its up to the reader to decide just how good or bad a unit may be.
  • Aris_Mp
    I agree with you on this, however on page #9 among others you will find a performance graph which can easily play the same role. On top of that it offers comparison data including relevant offerings so a reader can easily figure how the product fares against the competition.
  • Gam3r01
    While that is included, it dosent give an overall final score. Saying the RMx scored 9% higher is alot different to readers than saying the RMx got a 9.8/10 for ecample.
  • SamSerious
    Point Scales are horrible and i am glad that TH is one of the few remaining sites not to do so. There are already enoguh websites and magazines for people who prefer points, and stars over content.