Cooler Master MasterWatt Maker: The Parallel Development Of A Second High-End PSU Model

Cooler Master has released one model of its high-end MasterWatt Maker series, with 1200W max power. We already covered this product in a previous news post, published a couple of weeks before Computex. However during the show, we noticed another high-end PSU in addition to the digital MasterWatt Titanium unit. This one has similar capacity and efficiency, and is still under development.

We should stress that Cooler Master decided to rename all of its PSU lines using the MasterWatt description. The flagship family of products is the MasterWatt Maker, which currently includes only one member, followed by MasterWatt Pro, including the existing V series models with 80 PLUS Platinum and Gold efficiency. The rest of Cooler Master's PSU lines will be the MasterWatt and MasterWatt light. The company plans to use Silencio fans on all of its PSU models.

The second MasterWatt 1200 features an analog platform supported by a digital interface in order to provide PSU status data through a corresponding application. What is interesting here is that, according to our sources, this analog unit will offer even higher performance than the already-released, digital-controlled MasterWatt PSU. In order to avoid confusion, this new PSU will most likely use another name once it is ready to hit the market (expect it in 2017).

We took some photos of both MasterWatt platforms and indeed the analog one looks highly interesting. The existing MasterWatt is made by Enhance Electronics while the upcoming one is developed by a Japanese company, which unfortunately we are not allowed to mention. This new OEM has never developed a desktop PSU before, so the upcoming MasterWatt will be its first try.

What we know for sure is that some ideas stemming from this parallel project, which started before Enhance handled the design and construction of the already-released digital MasterWatt, have also been used in the existing platform. One of those ideas is depicted on the specially-designed cables, which have heavy duty connectors on the PSU side to handle increased amperage (up to 1.5x more) compared to normal connectors.

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  • BadActor
    I think the PSU manufacturer's are missing the boat with these high wattage offerings. As CPU's and GPU's become more power efficient and SLI not as a prevalent, the average power needs are going to drop. I wish they would focus on good quality, low cost 400 to 500 watt models. Surely there has to be more money in the higher volume.
  • alidan
    Quote:
    I think the PSU manufacturer's are missing the boat with these high wattage offerings. As CPU's and GPU's become more power efficient and SLI not as a prevalent, the average power needs are going to drop. I wish they would focus on good quality, low cost 400 to 500 watt models. Surely there has to be more money in the higher volume.


    would never use less then a 650 in my pc, 750 preferable, and 850 if i found a deal.
  • DarkSable
    Quote:
    would never use less then a 650 in my pc, 750 preferable, and 850 if i found a deal.


    And you're perfectly welcome to do that if you please; it's your money.

    That doesn't change the fact that even a high-end, moderately overclocked single-GPU computer built right now needs a good quality 650w power supply at most; and even that is going to have a lot of overhead.

    So long as the power supply is of very good quality, it can easily handle slight jumps over specs - as proven by my 4-year old system that has run without a single problem on a 450w SFX power supply because it was the largest available at the time. After overclocking, the estimated TDP is still only about 400w... and that's using parts that came before the recent push for efficiency.