Cooler Master MasterAir MA410P CPU Cooler Review: An RGB Value Pick

Testing Results & Conclusion

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For our comparison testing, we utilize data from standardized testing methods collected during prior CPU cooling reviews on our six-core Core i7-5930k running at 4.2GHz and 1.20V. Data collected throughout testing of the MasterAir MA410P will be compared against three quad-heatpipe coolers similar in dimension: the FSP Windale 4, the LEPA NEOIllusion and the Arctic Freezer 33 TR.

Our thermal load graph immediately shows us that the MasterAir MA410P just narrowly missed having the best CPU load temperatures of this competitive set, right behind the FSP Windale 4. It did manage to pull down the overall best voltage-regulator thermal cooling by cooling nearby motherboard components better than the rest of the testing field.

Rotational fan speed can provide a bit of insight into how well a CPU cooler functions or how it plays to strengths. The MasterAir MA410P uses the second-highest fan speed (at maximum) of all the coolers in our testing group, and as we saw before, it was neck and neck with the FSP Windale 4 in cooling temperatures. So, where the Windale 4 would appear to be more efficient with its cooling-fin design and fan-choice match, the MasterAir MA410P must make up ground by running a slightly higher fan speed.

By having a slightly higher RPM, the Cooler Master MasterAir MA410P did turn in a higher decibel reading, although only by slight grades of whisper. Only the buzzy LEPA NEOIllusion fan really stood out here, and that only at 100% fan speed. The rest of the testing field, at both half and full speeds, was relatively quiet.

The decibel levels of the MA410P fan at full speed didn’t do much to help it in our relative noise comparison, but we noted an interesting catch. The very low sound levels of the Arctic Freezer 33 TR and the FSP Windale 4 gave the testing group overall a very low average noise level, to the extent that the 35-decibel reading of the MA410P registered a negative value on our comparison chart. Effective cooling at low noise levels has become quite the battle arena.

Our Performance Value comparison chart, above, shows where the Cooler Master MasterAir MA410P's retail price really affects its overall value. With a retail price of $49, it was the second-highest-priced cooler in our testing group, just a dollar less than the LEPA NEOIllusion. The very low retail price of the FSP Windale 4, combined with its solid performance and low noise levels, helped it streak past the rest of the field with the best Performance Value placement overall. The slight price premium the MA410P draws is enough to sway the result pendulum in the other direction.

When we stop to really compare the Cooler Master MasterAir MA410P and the FSP Windale 4, we see that up until the Performance Value chart, they each tallied up very similar numbers. One thing to note, though, is that the FSP Windale 4 does not have an RGB-color-capable fan like the MA410P, let alone any lighting effects at all. Simple logic states, then, if you had to pick between the best performers of this group, you are either choosing a basic, no-frills cooler equipped with a standard fan, or an almost equally no-frills cooler, but with a fan that has RGB color capability.

Ultimately, the Cooler Master MasterAir MA410P is quality mid-tower heatpipe cooler that's closer to the top of the premium price list for its class. While it does provide value for what it offers, it's worth noting that other good-value options exist if your budget is a bit more reserved, or you don't care much about on-cooler lighting.

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  • FD2Raptor
    "The MasterAir MA410P makes use of six direct-contact copper heatpipes that collect in parallel beneath the aluminum mounting base."

    I'm thinking somebody missed something during copypasting.
  • rubix_1011
    It looks to be an incomplete sentence statement that should have read "The MasterAir MA410P makes use of four, six millimeter direct-contact copper heatpipes that collect in parallel beneath the aluminum mounting base."
  • jdchen003
    So... This cooler is basically a Hyper 212 with an RGB fan?
  • oneblackened
    So how is this different from a Hyper 212? Looks exactly the same minus some cosmetic changes...
  • Co BIY
    I would like to see a thermal camera image of the coolers in operation. It would be interesting to see how the heat pipes and fins operate thermodynamically .
  • Nintendork
    One would expect a comparison to the thing people actually want it to be compared with:

    The Coolermaster Hyper 212 EVO/X
  • FD2Raptor
    The CM MA410P and its brother, the MA610P, land at the bottom of the stacks of coolers tested on Toms (Cryorig R1/Noctua D15/Scythe Fuma/Scythe Mugen 5/ Noctua U14S/U12S/Deepcool gammax 400/etc) and the MA410P is also the loudest among the bunch.

    There's absolutely no reason to buy it unless your really want that RGB fan...
  • AgentLozen
    When was the last time Tom's did a big CPU fan roundup?
    I'd like to see the 12 modern fans get a brief analysis and then a comparison across several metrics. In the conclusion, you could give out recommendations based on classes like 1. Size/Weight, 2. Cooling Performance, 3. Noise Performance, and 4. Price. I know Tom's has done roundups like these before, but I feel like it's been a while since I've seen one.
  • FD2Raptor
    Here's my Excel online aggregation of data from the more recent Tom's cooler review featuring:

    Cryorig R1 Ultimate / Noctua NH-D15 / Scythe Fuma / CM Master Air Pro 4 / Be Quiet Dark Rock 3 Pro / Deepcool GAMMAX 400 / Deepcool Assassin II / Noctua NH-U14S / Scythe Mugen 5 / Be Quiet Shadow Rock Slim / Arctic Freezer 33 eSports Edition / Thermalright True Spirit 140 Direct / Noctua NH-U12S / FSP Windale 6 / FSP Windale 4 / CM Master Air MA410P / CM Master Air MA610P.

    And some AIO liquid coolers in separate charts.
  • rubix_1011
    205977 said:
    One would expect a comparison to the thing people actually want it to be compared with: The Coolermaster Hyper 212 EVO/X


    Considering the Hyper 212 line is very old, it has been reviewed and compared almost literally to death. Most of our reviews cover data of other coolers relevant in price, size and release date.
  • rubix_1011
    496490 said:
    When was the last time Tom's did a big CPU fan roundup? I'd like to see the 12 modern fans get a brief analysis and then a comparison across several metrics. In the conclusion, you could give out recommendations based on classes like 1. Size/Weight, 2. Cooling Performance, 3. Noise Performance, and 4. Price. I know Tom's has done roundups like these before, but I feel like it's been a while since I've seen one.


    The last I have heard, we aren't doing as many 'roundups' like we used to do. I think this is a direction that we're moving to for all reviews, not just cooling, with focus on individual products.
  • shrapnel_indie
    116659 said:
    205977 said:
    One would expect a comparison to the thing people actually want it to be compared with: The Coolermaster Hyper 212 EVO/X
    Considering the Hyper 212 line is very old, it has been reviewed and compared almost literally to death. Most of our reviews cover data of other coolers relevant in price, size and release date.


    I don't disagree about the Hyper 212 series. Unfortunately, that age has placed it in many people's arsenal of go-to coolers despite that it shows its age. It's hard to convince them to forget about that cooler without direct comparisons that show that it isn't the top performer for its price point/range any more.
  • AgentLozen
    rubix_1011 said:
    The last I have heard, we aren't doing as many 'roundups' like we used to do. I think this is a direction that we're moving to for all reviews, not just cooling, with focus on individual products.


    Thanks for the reply Rubix. I suspect that Tomshardware feels that the "Our Best Picks" section of the website replaces the need for a roundup. I understand the value of trimming down the fat and just getting to the recommendations, but I prefer to compare the results from a wider range of product testing.

    Edit:
    Shrapnel_indie said:
    It's hard to convince them to forget about that cooler without direct comparisons that show that it isn't the top performer for its price point/range any more.


    This point also illustrates the benefit of a wider data analysis. Should I upgrade my Intel 3570K to a 7600K? What's the difference in performance? Should I continue to rely on my go to Antec Three Hundred One case (I love that thing btw), or is it time to find something more modern? Is the Noctua NH-D14 still the boss, or is it worth considering today's Cooler Master fan? I'm more easily convinced when I have the metrics all in one place.
  • rubix_1011
    @ AgenLozen - yes, I believe that is the overall direction that reviews are headed, but honestly, voicing opinions like this is a great way to get what you, the reader, actually wishes to see. We are always looking for ways to provide content that our readers wish to view and our analytics department is always number crunching all sorts of data based on page views and clicks.