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Windows 8 Has a Slightly Friendlier Blue Screen of Death

By - Source: Mobility Digest | B 9 comments

It's still death, but it's a little nicer.

Those blue screens of death (BSoD) are never a good thing in Windows. It makes pros cringe and casual computer users cry out for help.

Unfortunately, system crashes are a part of any computer platform, but Microsoft is making it a little less cryptic and scary. This is what the BSoD looks like in the developer preview of Windows 8 released yesterday:

So it's still blue and it doesn't change the fact that the system needs to restart after a crash, but at least it's not a confusing mess of letters and numbers.

Discuss
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  • 2 Hide
    tranzz , 16 September 2011 00:51
    What were you doing?? If you could also give me the details of the system and i will see if I can help.
  • 3 Hide
    Silmarunya , 16 September 2011 01:43
    BSOD's used to be mildly informative: often, the error code gave you at least some sort of hint as to what piece of software or hardware caused the issue. This thing? Not so much.

    I know simple and user friendly became the norm in the wake of Apple's and Google's success, but user friendly doesn't have to mean dumbed down. Apple didn't learn that lesson properly and MS isn't learning it either...
  • 1 Hide
    mactronix , 16 September 2011 01:55
    What I would rather it say is Sorry it appears your (Insert relevant hardware here) has an issue why not test it.

    Mactronix
  • 1 Hide
    santfu , 16 September 2011 02:00
    I'm assuming win8 will be at least as stable as win 7, only had one bsod and that was a hardware fault.
  • 0 Hide
    silver565 , 16 September 2011 03:46
    I'm pleased it's cleaned up a bit. But I was really hoping for the error codes... they were handy
  • 0 Hide
    silver565 , 16 September 2011 03:46
    santfuI'm assuming win8 will be at least as stable as win 7, only had one bsod and that was a hardware fault.


    Yea. The only BSOD I had on win7 was my fault. I allocated too much ram to VM's
  • 0 Hide
    Takuhi , 16 September 2011 06:35
    The error codes don't really need to be shown during the STOP error (BSoD). All the relevant codes and information is stored in the dump file. Using something like MS Windows Debugger lets you track down exactly what happened, including what process was the likely culprit.

    This screen will help to ease worries of less advanced users, and those that really know what's going on with a STOP error won't really care.

    It's win win either way.
  • 0 Hide
    mactronix , 16 September 2011 15:59
    That's the whole point, why hide the actual reason away in the error logs ? If the idea is to make it more user friendly then do something helpful like tell people who are not as informed as others what is wrong.
    This is not user friendly or helpful its a dumbing down of what we had before.
    It seems probable that the text below the main message is referring to a link where you can go and it will tell you what is wrong, which probably means M$ will need full access to your system. Not happening.
  • 2 Hide
    Fox Montage , 16 September 2011 21:25
    TakuhiThe error codes don't really need to be shown during the STOP error (BSoD). All the relevant codes and information is stored in the dump file. Using something like MS Windows Debugger lets you track down exactly what happened, including what process was the likely culprit.This screen will help to ease worries of less advanced users, and those that really know what's going on with a STOP error won't really care.It's win win either way.


    While this is true, a dump file is not very helpful if you can't boot your os far enough to access them. :p