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Technology Meets Porn

Technology Meets Porn
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It’s no longer a dirty little secret. In fact, it’s no secret at all: a lot of new technology we’ve come to rely on in the past 30 years has been fuelled by the adult entertainment industry.

Trace the evolution of many new advances in home entertainment, and you’ll often find the adult entertainment industry played a big hand in establishing that technology in the marketplace. The VHS-Betamax format war was decided in part by the porn business, which lead the charge for home video market in the early days. And it’s impossible to discuss the growth and maturation of the Internet without mentioning the tremendous impact of pornography on file-sharing, Usenet groups, streaming media and video download technology. And the pornography is even changing the face of video games, not to mention helping to determine the outcome of the new high-definition DVD format war.

The first home entertainment innovation the adult industry pushed through was the VCR. It took a long time for the major studios to see its potential. At first, the mainstream Hollywood studios were terrified of people being able to easily pirate movies and TV shows, and didn’t see it as the huge secondary market it eventually became. In fact, in 1983 Universal Studios sued Sony, which created the Betamax videotape format, and argued that Betamax enabled copyright infringement. The case reached the U.S. Supreme Court in 1984, which famously ruled that consumers recording TV shows and movies for their own enjoyment didn’t constitute piracy and was therefore deemed "fair use" by the court.

Betamax may have boasted better quality video, but the porn business went with VHS for its home video effort.

While Hollywood was resistant, the adult film industry, however, saw the VCR’s promise right away. Rodger Jacobs, who has written hundreds of adult films, often under the "nom de porn" Martin Brimmer, says the porn business embraced the VCR out of necessity. "The adult industry doesn’t have the venues for filmed product that the mainstream does," Jacobs said. "In the ’70s, just the legal question of what is obscenity and what is pornography became a political football, and adult theaters started to disappear through various obscenity laws. The industry needed another delivery platform."

As Bill Asher, president of Vivid Entertainment Group, explains, moving to video was necessary for the adult business. "For us, the theatrical [venue] was never that big of a market. Adult film at the time was relatively small. Back in the day, there were just [some] small theaters, and you only made a few movies." he said. "Movies were costly to make, and you could only get so many people into the theaters. It wasn’t a very profitable business at the time, and not many movies got made."

Another problem the VCR eliminated was "the embarrassment factor" that kept many from going to adult theaters. The more discreet the business can make the product for the consumer to buy, the better. "Adult film was always waiting for a way to get into the privacy of your own home," Asher said. "With adult [films], privacy is the key factor. We thought it was going to be bigger than theatrical very early on. It was the first great chance to get into the home."

Charles Band, who founded the first independent mainstream video company, Media Home Entertainment, said the introduction of the VCR forever changed the porn business. "The VCR was the ultimate leap for people to enjoy porno without having to go to a sticky, gross theatre, and be there with a bunch of other weirdos," Band said.

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    alhbib2008 , 3 September 2008 01:05
    i like this film verey sexy