Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Game Benchmarks

How To: Get A 4 GHz Dual-Core For $120
By

Because Crysis is primarily limited by graphics horsepower, it hits limits once a certain amount of processing power is available. Whether the Core 2 Duo E7200 runs at 3.4 GHz or 3.8 GHz doesn’t make much difference. The 2.53 GHz stock clock speed isn’t sufficient, though.

Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the UK Article comments forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

Display all 5 comments.
This thread is closed for comments
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , 17 November 2008 23:13
    Why didnt you bench the processor at the same speed as the 8500 to make things nice and easy?...
  • 0 Hide
    graphicequaliser , 21 November 2008 02:00
    I have an E8500 overclocked to 3.8GHz using the 400MHz FSB and DDR2-800 Nanya dual channel memory running 1:1. It is the fastest ever and it barely gets warm. It is my home PC. I also have an office PC running an E7200 at stock speeds and that is nice and fast (quiet too). I must say Intel's new 45nm chips are really excellent vfm, fast and ecologically-friendly. Well done Intel! You can find my configs and benchmarks under the picture at http://www.jacobsm.com/index.htm#rngimg
  • 0 Hide
    Solitaire , 25 November 2008 01:33
    You moan about how lame the E5200 is then fail to even bench it to prove your point. You also forgot to say that quite a few people can't afford the extra ~€50 to buy a E7200 over a E5200, or that they'd probably have to spend a similar additional amount on an even better performance mobo to eke out the higher FSB needed to effectively OC a E7200.

    Yes, more FSB is good, but it costs money as the combination of a FSB1066 CPU and a low multiplier means you need a performance mobo that can run stable at FSB1600 to get the E7200 to a speed the high-mult, low-FSB E5200 can achieve at a measly 302MHz FSB (FSB1208 quad-pumped) - something even many cheapie boards can achieve (with FSB1333 compliance being considered the entry level more and more now).

    And I'm surprised that you need 1.40v+ to keep the E7200 stable at 3.8GHz - my E5200 is stable up to 3.75GHz at just 1.30v, and I'm nowhere near finished OCing it. The E5200 is based on low-binned silicon dies and thus is on average more power-hungry (and hot/wasteful), requiring relatively higher voltages to achieve the same speeds as the middle-binned E7XXX (which is in turn inferior to the high-bin E8XXX). Just as a comparison the Intel safety spec says voltages over 1.3625v are not at all good for a 45nm chip's health (although extreme cooling mitigates this somewhat)...
  • 0 Hide
    bobalazs , 25 April 2010 22:29
    The only thing that sucks about this processor is that it does not have virtualization.Otherwise, it's cheap, and easily overclockable.
  • 0 Hide
    bobalazs , 25 April 2010 22:32
    For proper overclock you would have to reduce the 9.5 multiplier to 9 or 8 as most motherboards have trouble with the half multi.