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Video Cards, Power Supply, And Case

System Builder Marathon, June 2010: $1,000 Enthusiast PC
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Video Cards: 2 x Radeon HD 5830 in CrossFire

Choosing a pair of Radeon HD 5830s is our most controversial decision for this build, and we don’t make it lightly. There are a lot of other great options sitting at the same price or cheaper than the $480 we spent on these cards, so let’s spend some time talking about the mechanics of our decision.

Read Customer Reviews of Gigabyte's Radeon HD 5830


Our favorite choice would have been a pair of Radeon HD 5850 cards, but there’s simply no way to fit the $600 price tag into our $1,000 budget. With that off of the table, we considered a single Radeon HD 5870 or a dual Radeon HD 4890 setup. Past experience has shown us that dual Radeon HD 4890 cards will easily best a single Radeon HD 5870, so we leaned toward the CrossFire solution.

Radeon HD 4890s are getting somewhat rare though, and we’ve been there and done that a number of times now. We’d prefer to try something new, so we went ahead and spent an extra $80 on a couple of Radeon HD 5830 cards. This is where the water gets muddy, as the $480 price tag is within spitting distance of the new GeForce GTX 480, although the new Nvidia card was extremely difficult to find and more expensive when we placed our Newegg order.

In the end, our curiosity got the best of us, and we feel that a couple of Radeon HD 5830s have a better shot against the dual Radeon HD 5850s in the $1,500 SBM machine we're up against.

The specific model we chose was the cheapest available at the time of ordering, $240 each—potentially $220 with a $20 mail-in rebate: Gigabyte’s R583UD-1GD.

On a final note, Radeon HD 5830 cards can now be had for as low as $220 online, a much more palpable price point for the Radeon HD 5830.

Power Supply: Corsair CMPSU-650TX

Read Customer Reviews of Corsair's CMPSU-650TX


We’re fans of the Corsair CMPSU-750TX, but we have to admit that the power it offers is probably overkill for all but the most demanding builds. With a smaller budget, we have to cut back where it makes sense, and this means we’ll opt for the 750TX’s little brother, the CMPSU-650TX.

Not to worry, though. Since we have a 52A 12V rail and CrossFire certification, we don’t expect to have any problems. Frankly, the 650TX might even be a little more than we need for the $1,000 machine. But for $90, we can live with the extravagance.

PC Case: Antec Three Hundred

Read Customer Reviews of Antec's Three Hundred


Antec’s budget enthusiast case is ideal for our purposes because it offers what we’re looking for from an enclosure for a very reasonable price. This is precisely what we need with our lower price target, and at $60, we have no complaints.

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  • 1 Hide
    goxon , 16 June 2010 16:27
    nothing for us in rest of the world? we are not competitive for you? maybe we need to go somewhere else
  • 1 Hide
    mi1ez , 16 June 2010 20:09
    Would have been interesting to see if the cpu could have been pushed further as an X3 and how that would have affected the benches.
  • 1 Hide
    eriko , 16 June 2010 20:50
    Would be interesting if each time they build one of these systems they ship it off to me!
  • 0 Hide
    williehmmm , 16 June 2010 23:36
    Agree with mi1ez, from what I've read a x3 can clock a bit higher than x4, and most games don't use that 4th core, so a better set up may have been x3 hitting 3.6 - 3.8 rather than locked down to 3.4 x4.
  • -1 Hide
    mi1ez , 17 June 2010 20:42
    reported
  • 0 Hide
    baldinie , 17 June 2010 23:16
    is this just a plug for intel. Why does the june system for $1000 go up against a march system for 1500. obviously in the space of 3 months, $500 IS going to make a huge difference. and why 2x5830, not jus a 5870?
    Specially in the UK where our slump in the £ and the fact that we subsidise the US marke with equvilent £/$ pricing makes these parts way more expensive now.
  • 0 Hide
    stephenriddle , 18 June 2010 00:45
    I built a system very similar to this a couple of months ago with:
    CPU: core i5 750 ~$200
    GPU: Radeon 5850 ~$290
    RAM: 4GB (2x2GB)G.skill echo low voltage (1.35v)
    Mobo: Asus p55
    with those changes my 3dmark was over 18k
  • 0 Hide
    discboy321 , 18 June 2010 14:40
    As a system builder myself I would love to see more builds in the $1000 mark and below. These are hard times no matter where you are from. By the way the next time you build a $2500 Intel Please ship it to me for a tryout. I can only dream of having one. By the way I am in Wisconsin,usa for the folks over at Toms Hardware. Also could you do more builds with a single card rather than always crossfire or sli conf. Thx
  • 0 Hide
    mi1ez , 28 June 2010 16:49
    reported