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Test Class 4: Adaptive Processing

Video Quality Tested: GeForce Vs. Radeon In HQV 2.0
By

The adaptive processing tests reveal the video processor’s ability to optimize contrast and color correction.

Chapter 1: Contrast Enhancement Tests

This chapter is composed of four tests, comprised of four different video clips that present different challenges for contrast enhancement. The first is a theme park during the day, the second is an overcast beach scene with driftwood, the third is a tropical beach at dusk, and the final scene has black and white cats laying beside each other. A perfect score of five is awarded for each scene where the contrast is expanded without loss of detail in the darkest and lightest regions. The score is lowered to two if there is slight loss of detail in the lightest and darkest regions, and a score of zero is given if there is moderate or high loss of detail.

This is one of the easier tests to score because it isn’t hard to notice if contrast has improved without loss of detail. It turns out that dynamic contrast is a little resource-intensive, and the low-end graphics hardware can’t handle the feature without choppy playback. But every card that is able to enable the dynamic contrast option scores a perfect five points for each test. We do notice that we have to disable the brighter whites option on Radeons cards so that the lightest regions will not overexpose and lose detail.

Contrast Enhancement Test Results (out of 5)

Radeon HD 6850Radeon HD 5750Radeon HD 5670Radeon HD 5550Radeon HD 5450
Scrolling Text
5
5
5
0
0
Roller Coaster
5
5
5
0
0
Ferris Wheel
5
5
5
0
0
Bridge Traffic
5
5
5
0
0

GeForce GTX 470GeForce GTX 460GeForce 9800 GTGeForce GT 240GeForce GT 430GeForce 210
Scrolling Text5
5
5
5
5
0
Roller Coaster5
5
5
5
5
0
Ferris Wheel5
5
5
5
5
0
Bridge Traffic5
5
5
5
5
0


Chapter 2: Skin Tone Correction Tests

Human beings tend to be sensitive to unrealistic skin tones, so this test examines the video processor’s ability to detect and correct skin tones that are unrealistic. The test consists of a picture of people with various skin colors, and the skin tone hues are shifted off of their true colors over time. The maximum 10 points are awarded if off-hue skin tones are corrected to appear substantially closer to the original skin tone without affecting other colors in the scene. This drops to seven points if the skin tones are corrected somewhat, but problems in hue are still discernable, or three points if the skin tones are somewhat corrected, but non-skin colors are affected. If no improvement is observed, no points are awarded:

The Radeons have the advantage here, with the only dedicated flesh-tone setting in the driver. Even then, the test is admittedly difficult to judge. We could not detect any change when turning the GeForce color enhancement feature on while assessing the hardware.

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Skin Tone Correction Test Results (out of 10)
Radeon HD 6850Radeon HD 5750Radeon HD 5670Radeon HD 5550Radeon HD 5450
7
7
7
7
7
GeForce GTX 470GeForce GTX 460GeForce 9800 GTGeForce GT 240GeForce GT 430GeForce 210
0
00
0
0
0
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  • 2 Hide
    mi1ez , 2 February 2011 17:46
    Quote:
    Arguably, the 2:2 cadence is somewhat less important than 3:2. Most films are recorded at 24 FPS and this is converted with the 3:2 pulldown cadence, while the 2:2 cadence is only used in countries following the PAL and SECAM standards that shoot film destined for television at 25 FPS. As such, I question the wisdom of assigning these two cadences the same point value. The 3:2 cadence should be worth more points.

    There are people live in these PAL and SECAM regions you obnoxious tosser!
  • 1 Hide
    mi1ez , 2 February 2011 17:53
    Quote:
    It’s arguable that these cadences should be assigned far fewer points than 3:2 and 2:2 film cadences. There are some relatively obscure ratios here that many viewers will never see. So, in our opinion, the weighting of these tests on the final score (30 points out of 210) may unrealistically indicate all-around video performance.


    Actually, I quite liking watching animation, so they're NOT obscure, and SHOULD receive the weighting.
  • 0 Hide
    mi1ez , 2 February 2011 18:16
    Interesting results, pity it's so American and narrow minded.
  • 1 Hide
    gdilord , 2 February 2011 18:17
    mi1ezThere are people live in these PAL and SECAM regions
    Thanks for mentioning us mi1ez!
  • 1 Hide
    mi1ez , 2 February 2011 19:01
    Quote:
    Thanks for mentioning us mi1ez!

    That really pissed me off when I read it!
  • 3 Hide
    dazzaling69 , 2 February 2011 20:54
    NTSC is the minority TV system in the world regardless of whether you measure it by viewers or countries.

    Check out this for a pictorial representation

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:p AL-NTSC-SECAM.svg

    Depending on how you count it:

    45 - Number of countries that use 60i system
    131 - Number of countries that use 50i system

    You need to acknowledge that America is not the world!!!