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Conclusion

Nvidia GeForce GTX 275 Preview: A Well-Timed Retaliatory Strike?
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Before the GeForce GTX 275 even arrived here at the lab, I was finishing up my first look at ATI’s Radeon HD 4890. My conclusion was that, while the re-timed RV790 core did in fact facilitate higher clock speeds and consequently more performance, the extra $70 to $80 dollars it’d cost to get 10% more performance simply was not worthwhile. Should the HD 4890’s price drop to $200 or so (which it very well might in light of this new competition--Update: In fact, it looks like ATI is aiming for $220 with mail-in-rebates, which gets us a little closer), we’d be much more likely to step up from the Radeon HD 4870 1 GB to a retail HD 4890 and try our hand overclocking the 4890 even farther.

In short, the $180-ish Radeon HD 4870 1 GB and GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 are priced too attractively to warrant such a high premium on a few extra frames.

And now we’re faced with the GeForce GTX 275—a card that Nvidia coyly suggests will cost $249 and will be widely available by April 14th. It’s tempting to apply the same logic here, since the GTX 275 represents an incremental performance increase versus the GTX 260 Core 216. But Nvidia’s lineup is a little different, requiring a fresh perspective.

Instead of bridging a gap between the $180 HD 4870 to $430 HD 4870 X2, like ATI’s $249 HD 4890 does, the GeForce family has a $340 GeForce GTX 285 wedged between its dual-GPU GTX 295 and this new GTX 275. That GeForce GTX 285 does open the door to a higher resolution or additional eye-candy feature beyond what you could enable with a GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 down at the $180 price point.  I know—that’s a mess of models and prices, but there’s sense to be made of it.

The GeForce GTX 275 sports the same core configuration as Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 285. And while its memory sub-system is handicapped in comparison, your most playable frame rates are going to be 1680x1050 and 1920x1200—resolutions that aren’t as affected by memory as 2560x1600.

The bottom line is that, as our Sum charts indicate, the GeForce GTX 275 looks a lot like a GeForce GTX 285 at those two lower resolutions. The GTX 275 is generally a little faster than the Radeon HD 4890, too. And if Nvidia’s pricing projections turn out to be accurate, the GTX 275 will be priced similarly as well (at least right out of the gate, until The Market adjusts prices to correspond with relative performance).

With that said, the lower-cost GeForce GTX 260 Core 216 and Radeon HD 4870 1 GB are still mighty compelling for less than $200. If you were looking to step up to the GTX 275 from one of those boards, I’d hold off.

But if you were thinking about buying a GeForce GTX 285 at $340, the GeForce GTX 275 looks to be an impressive value, offering much of the same performance for $100 less.

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  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , 2 April 2009 18:43
    I expected the 4890 to be faster :o 
  • -1 Hide
    GavinT , 2 April 2009 19:04
    I'd take the benchmarks with a pinch of salt...kinda get the feeling they're pro nVidia here!
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , 2 April 2009 19:20
    http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/599/1051599/nvidia-hoodwinks-reviewers-mythical-gt275s

    The main question is if the boards the reviewers get are going to be different to the ones that appear on sale. Or is the Inq just having a go at nVidia because they don't like them at the moment.
  • 0 Hide
    godfath3r , 2 April 2009 19:47
    yeah im gona wait a couple of weeks after the wide release before making my mind up. by then should have more of an idea on price and performance, and hopefully the 185 drivers will be fully released.

    then i shall decide on which card to get :D 
  • 1 Hide
    jennyh , 2 April 2009 19:58
    Anandtech has the 4890 beating the 275 in 7/8 benchmarks. It's just getting to be farcical now tbh.
  • 2 Hide
    david__t , 2 April 2009 20:00
    Can't we go back to the good old days of naming conventions on nVidia cards (such as the Geforce 2) where the low end part was the MX, then the Geforce 2, then the GTS & then the Ultra? Now there are so many model names, memory configurations & die sizes, I'm suprised even they know which card is best any more!
  • 1 Hide
    GavinT , 2 April 2009 20:25
    BreadonArrivalhttp://www.theinquirer.net/inquire [...] cal-gt275sThe main question is if the boards the reviewers get are going to be different to the ones that appear on sale. Or is the Inq just having a go at nVidia because they don't like them at the moment.


    Charlie is definitely an ATI fan, have a read of more of his articles and you'll see that. It's a shame that there are not many sites that are neutral when it comes to hardware reviews.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , 2 April 2009 21:02
    www.novatech.co.uk already have loads of both cards on sale. They were available from midnight. How come all the review sites apart rom this one show the radeon 4890 to be faster in most benchmarks, but this is the opposite way around?
  • 0 Hide
    wild9 , 3 April 2009 00:09
    david__tCan't we go back to the good old days of naming conventions on nVidia cards (such as the Geforce 2) where the low end part was the MX, then the Geforce 2, then the GTS & then the Ultra? Now there are so many model names, memory configurations & die sizes, I'm surprised even they know which card is best any more!


    I agree, David. They should offer degree courses in this stuff. The honours would go to the those who summise that just because a card has a higher model number doesn't necessarily mean it's better. Unfortunately by the time those people are ready to collect their degrees they'll be old hat since by the time the ink's dried on the certificate there'll be yet another set of cards to decipher :) 
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , 3 April 2009 08:34
    ATI needs to push some of the developers with games like Nvidia are doing to get the scene moving.

    each to their own with games, but i still get 90+ fps with 1x gtx 260 on cod 4 & 5 @ 1920, so what's the point in buying a newer card? if you wanna keep up with the "Jones's" then you are a fool with $$ or ££'s to waste.

    We need some new games...games that are gonna push graphics to the limit...make us want, sorry, NEED to spend money on new hardware.

  • 2 Hide
    Reynod , 3 April 2009 22:15
    Bottom line is NVidia can't produce these and make a profit so the halo effect of a higher end card will not do them any good when they can't produce them in volume (won't in fact either as they lose money on them)and ATI will just drop the price on their gpu anyway.

    NVidia are stuck with a die too big to OC, and too expensive to produce in volume unless they are massively faster ... which they are not.

    Goodbye NVidia ... IBM or Intel are about to buy you.
  • 0 Hide
    americanbrian , 4 April 2009 05:23
    I like how they stress the importance that the drivers are still in beta here, but on the 4890 review they don't mention it at all.
  • 0 Hide
    americanbrian , 4 April 2009 05:28
    and to quote:

    "Update: In fact, it looks like ATI is aiming for $220 with mail-in-rebates, which gets us a little closer), we’d be much more likely to step up from the Radeon HD 4870 1 GB to a retail HD 4890 and try our hand overclocking the 4890 even farther."

    However for this review they didn't overclock it at all. They overclocked it a titchy wee bit in its own review.

    Here though theis implies that they are running an overclocked card against a stock Nvidia card which is simply not the truth.
  • -1 Hide
    t-track , 7 April 2009 08:05
    'I expected the 4890 to be faster'

    Hahaha...confused? That is right, m8. This review is a wrong call.

    The article is comparing a ATI's 4890 to Nvidia's 260 and 285 by using a driver for the new 4890 that actually does not support fully this card and on the other side a well updated and well tested driver for the Nvidias' counterparts.

    That is why the conclusions about the cards' performance are ill founded.

    Wait until the release of the new catalyst 9.4 and you will see that 4890 does not only kill NV 280, but also NV285 at this price range.
    ;) 
  • 0 Hide
    sheol , 7 April 2009 17:33
    I'm sorry, but I think this is something you should look into:

    DirectX 10.1 in Stalker - you say, that "all are running DX10 to keep it consistent", but which player would play a game at dx10, if there's an option to improve performance with dx10.1? therefore the whole comparison is pointless for me.
    Same point with Physx - you should put the results in the same table as the rest of the results when a game supports physx, so people get a better overview, not just some artificial results that don't tell the whole story.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , 1 April 2012 17:10
    them any good when they can't produce them in volume (won't in fact either as they lose money on them)and ATI will just drop the price on their gpu anyway.