SSD Storage Amount

Is 250gb enough SSD storage for a non-gamer?

Some on here claim that videos, songs, etc... would not gain anything noticeably by being on an SSD instead of HDD and obviously nobody is going to use 250GB of space if only programs are on it...

I guess gamers get some benefit form games being on a SSD?

If I plan to transfer something to an external drive for backup, too, though, wouldn't it be better to at least initially have it on an SSD. That would speed up the transfer, especially if my external source ends up being an SSD, too. But then could move it from SSD to HDD, I guess, once backed up.

Anyway, I ask all of this because I can get a 250gb samsung evo 960 for less than $100 or 850 for less than $70.
Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
81 answers Last reply
More about ssd storage amount
  1. an off topic ps: in Edge the login page on here goes to a http 500 error page, so had to log in with another browser....
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  2. How much storage you need depends on how much you plan to store. NO ONE can answer that for you. 250gb can easily be consumed by applications. It depends on how many and of what sort. I have a 250gb boot ssd and I originally was only going to install apps on the 2nd 250gb SSD (which I used for games and apps). I have since replaced the 250gb SSD with a 500 and I also had to uninstall most apps and re-install them on the boot disk. The boot disk is now almost full. The 512gb SSD is also almost full. I don't put music, video or photos on either SSD. I put those on a pair of 8tb hard disks which back each other up and also hold backups of the SSDs.
    I use photoshop, office, other photo editing software, a compiler, and so on. If I were to build today, I would get a faster boot disk (m.2) and a 1tb application SSD.
    Reply to bjornl
  3. I don't see how anyone could possibly use hundreds of gigabytes for only applications. Even the biggest applications are far, far, far below 1gb. Who has literally thousands of programs?

    So yes someone should be able to tell me how much space I need, by knowing I don't game. Either they can say yes I should store videos and music on the ssd too or no it won't help enough to matter, as long as the programs playing them are on the SSD. That answer alone tells if I need it, as there's just no way any average person could use up hundreds of GB on applications.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  4. For the average user 240-256GB is enough. Games are getting rather large so having multiple SSDs or just standard hard drives is necessary for gamers that want more than a few AAA titles installed.

    You are correct that music and video files gain little from SSDs, unless the playback rate of the file exceeds the drive's speed, this is pretty much impossible. Only drawback to hard drives would be if they go into power save mode and you have to wait a few seconds for them to spin up. (I consider that a positive in terms of energy saving)

    Internal SSD to an external drive will be limited by the connection type more so then the drives. Not a whole lot of connections that will let an SSD go full speed during a transfer. internally connected SATA docks would be limited to SATA III speeds (~500MB/s). USB 3.0 is approximately as fast as that. Anything further and you are looking at USB 3.1 or 3.2, which are still relatively rare.
    Reply to Eximo
  5. Thanks. Is m.2 simply a connection type? And you're basically saying usb 3 would be the limiting factor, so still sata III would be close to the max transfer speed?

    What I'd "like" to do is have a 1tb one to then not need a HDD except for an external for backup. But then it's getting costly.

    ANy thoughts on how much better the 960 is vs. the 850? I think the 850 of course has multiple connection types.... so I assume even with an 850 some are better than other ones.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  6. As cheap as HDDs are now, I could get the 250 SSD and a HUGE HDD for less than half the price of a 1tb SSD. So I lean that way...

    Although, I forgot another thing... someone on ehre said the higher storage amount SSD you get, the more stable it is...
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  7. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    I don't see how anyone could possibly use hundreds of gigabytes for only applications. Even the biggest applications are far, far, far below 1gb. Who has literally thousands of programs?

    So yes someone should be able to tell me how much space I need, by knowing I don't game. Either they can say yes I should store videos and music on the ssd too or no it won't help enough to matter, as long as the programs playing them are on the SSD. That answer alone tells if I need it, as there's just no way any average person could use up hundreds of GB on applications.


    You don't sound like you know all that much about computers based on your post so claiming someone can't possibly use 100's of GB on applications seems like you are talking out a bad part of your anatomy. You really should provide more information before saying we should be able to tell you what you need. Non gaming doesn't tell us anything. Do you take a lot of photos and don't shrink before storing? 200GB used up easily right there. Do you do any photo editing or video editing? It isn't just gaming that uses space... and it isn't just the application itself that uses space but the files you create WITH those applications.

    SSD's improve the speed of accessing the data and while games don't necessarily get faster while playing them, they certainly load faster with an SSD. With an SSD everything will feel faster and you can have more applications open without lagging when you switch between them. It is the only way to fly.
    Reply to BadAsAl
  8. Be insulting all you want, but "photos and videos" are not applications. Programs take up meaningless amounts of space. If I am so lacking in knowledge, it wouldn't be that hard for you to list off programs that magically take up many gigabytes. Heck, windows 10 itself could be put on a 250GB SSD around 50 times and any above mentioned programs are not going to take up remotely as much space as windows 10 does.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  9. Just looked up required space for photoshop. You could fit more than EIGHTY programs of that size on a 250GB SSD. So feel free to give me your list of 80 programs as large as photoshop that you are using, since I was dumb to say nobody is going to use hundreds of GB only on applications.

    Also, again, I wasn't asking you to assume space needed based on me not being a gamer. I was expecting someone to tell me types of content that do benefit form being on a SSD. So video editing itself would benefit form more, even though video playback wouldn't? I don't see how storing images on it would benefit much.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  10. Not intended to insult but your second post came across rather rude. Like "we" should know what to tell you with almost no information other than you are not a gamer.

    You need to tell us exactly what you intend to do, what you intend to install and then we can tell you if it will work.

    Most people install applications in order to use them to create things. Which take up space.
    Reply to BadAsAl
  11. BadAsAl said:
    Not intended to insult but your second post came across rather rude. Like "we" should know what to tell you with almost no information other than you are not a gamer.

    You need to tell us exactly what you intend to do, what you intend to install and then we can tell you if it will work.

    Most people install applications in order to use them to create things. Which take up space.




    I said it that way because the first response to me was saying no one (in caps) can tell me, when I was making it clear in my original post that I was wanting someone to tell me what type of content should be stored on the SSD, and I mentioned not being a gamer just to speed up someoen knowing what type of cotnent would be on it.

    So you're basically saying with photoshop, video editing software, etc... they'd be creating content, and that content would then be using up SSD space, right? Technically it could then be moved to the HDD, though, sao you'd not need much space on the SDD. just would be a hassle.

    I was going to say you could just have it create the content on the HDD to begin with, but I assume that would slow up the writing enough to make a difference? (in other words, does max writing speed from video editing software exceed the speed of writing to a HDD?).
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  12. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    Just looked up required space for photoshop. You could fit more than EIGHTY programs of that size on a 250GB SSD. So feel free to give me your list of 80 programs as large as photoshop that you are using, since I was dumb to say nobody is going to use hundreds of GB only on applications.

    Also, again, I wasn't asking you to assume space needed based on me not being a gamer. I was expecting someone to tell me types of content that do benefit form being on a SSD. So video editing itself would benefit form more, even though video playback wouldn't? I don't see how storing images on it would benefit much.


    I didn't say you were dumb. But regardless, let's get back to why you are here.

    Most people use Applications to create things which take up space. You nee to consider what you are going to create, not just the install size of the application. If you are wanting to know what you can store on your SSD you need to know what you are going to with your computer.

    Everything the average user does on a computer will benefit from an SSD. FPS in games may not be affected but load times will.
    Reply to BadAsAl
  13. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    BadAsAl said:
    Not intended to insult but your second post came across rather rude. Like "we" should know what to tell you with almost no information other than you are not a gamer.

    You need to tell us exactly what you intend to do, what you intend to install and then we can tell you if it will work.

    Most people install applications in order to use them to create things. Which take up space.




    I said it that way because the first response to me was saying no one (in caps) can tell me, when I was making it clear in my original post that I was wanting someone to tell me what type of content should be stored on the SSD, and I mentioned not being a gamer just to speed up someoen knowing what type of cotnent would be on it.

    So you're basically saying with photoshop, video editing software, etc... they'd be creating content, and that content would then be using up SSD space, right? Technically it could then be moved to the HDD, though, sao you'd not need much space on the SDD. just would be a hassle.

    I was going to say you could just have it create the content on the HDD to begin with, but I assume that would slow up the writing enough to make a difference? (in other words, does max writing speed from video editing software exceed the speed of writing to a HDD?).


    You will definitely lose performance by storing the created content on a HDD.
    So, you can install Windows and all the applications you need on the SSD, then anything you create will be stored on the HDD thus as you mentioned, not using as much space on the SSD.

    You would still benefit... Windows and the application will load much faster. Where it wouldn't make much difference is loading the content (say a large video) and then saving that content to the HDD. But frankly, most photo/video editors have this setup so they can store large amounts of data cheaply on a HDD but still have the other performance benefits of the SSD.
    Reply to BadAsAl
  14. Wouldn't it technically be better to write/edit on the SSD and then move the final product to the HDD, though? (other than taking loner and using up a lot of the finite writes you'd get from your SSD)?
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  15. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    Thanks. Is m.2 simply a connection type? And you're basically saying usb 3 would be the limiting factor, so still sata III would be close to the max transfer speed?

    What I'd "like" to do is have a 1tb one to then not need a HDD except for an external for backup. But then it's getting costly.

    ANy thoughts on how much better the 960 is vs. the 850? I think the 850 of course has multiple connection types.... so I assume even with an 850 some are better than other ones.


    M.2 itself is a connection form factor, yes. The protocol it runs varies on the drive and motherboard.

    SATA M.2 drives are basically as fast as their SATA counterparts. NVMe M.2 drives can be many times faster. Typically these connect up through PCIe 2.0 or 3.0 depending on the board. This dictates the maximum bandwidth.

    At full speed a USB 3.0 connection will be about equal to a SATA SSDs performance. So given overhead and the type of data being transferred it may be significantly slower.

    Thunderbolt and USB 3.1 and up CAN have higher speeds, but those standards aren't fixed. There are multiple speeds available depending, essentially, on how much PCIe bandwidth they are given to communicate on. And then you will need a drive on either end capable of that.

    You would have to be a lot more specific about which drives you are referring to. Yes the 850 Evo series is available in SATA M.2, mSATA, and standard SATA. Amongst those, form factor is not that important.

    I have an NVMe m.2 960 Evo, but I don't use my PC for much besides gaming, so my writes to the drive are fairly limited to compared to the typical user. Were it my only computer, I would probably have gone for MLC memory instead of TLC for longevity. I use a separate low power PC for multimedia purposes, and a lot of my technical fiddling. I have a laptop kicking around as well I use for electronics stuff.

    As for the typical size of applications. Well non-trivial applications for many fields are quite a bit larger. Anything involving 3D models, particularly with a large brush library, can be huge. Many engineering softwares have very large libraries as well. Photoshop may be small, but the whole creative suite is not. I could go on, but I am exposed to a lot of different software where I work.

    So the suggestion that only you can know how much space you need are correct. As are the comments regarding not having enough information to tell you without knowing more about what you use the computer for.
    Reply to Eximo
  16. That doesn't tell me any exact examples with space used. All I can tell you is right now, actual applications on my pc are taking up less than 50GB. I can't reasonably know how much space I would need if I don't have exact examples of what resource intensive software would use. Even if my interests change, surely I wouldn't sudden;y use multiple programs of those types. My guess is even if someone were an engineer, all of their enginnering programs would not take up 250+GB. You likely have used programs of different types on different computers and theorized that there may be one person on the planet who would be using all of them on the same computer (a person who is an engineer AND just so happens to be a 3d video editor...)
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  17. OK...spacewise.
    How large an SSD do you need, and what is cost beneficial.

    If you have other drives, a 250GB SSD is the current sweet spot.
    And at todays prices, there is little reason to NOT have an SSD for your OS and applications.

    Once you use one, you will NOT want to go back.

    For real world examples?
    My wifes system is basically email and facebook. No games at all.
    Currently about 85GB actual used space, on a 250GB 850 EVO.
    However, all the other stuff she uses lives on a 10+TB NAS box. Music/video/etc/etc.

    My main system?
    C drive is ~220GB consumed, in a 500GB 850 EVO. No data or games, just the Win 10 OS and applications. The largest being VisualStudio.

    Addendum to this: There are also 4 other SSD's in this system. 250GB, 250GB, 960GB, 120GB.

    My HTPC?
    Approx 30GB used in a 120GB drive.
    But that is ONLY the OS, VLC, and a couple of small utilities.
    All the actual data lives in the NAS box referenced above. Like the 2.6TB of video. Or the 150GB of music. etc etc.

    Applications don't take up a lot of space individually. A couple of movies, though...

    What size drive YOU need depends on your use.
    But there is little reason to get something smaller than a 250GB drive for a main use system.
    If it is the only drive, and you are very frugal, a 500GB.
    Reply to USAFRet
  18. Thanks.

    If I were only having 1 drive, the absolute lowest could go would be 1tb and I'd have to be constantly moving files then.

    So more than likely I am deciding between 250 and 500 and then deciding evo 960 or evo 850. Doubt I'd fool with PRO unless they are on amazing deals where they are same price as EVO.

    So I dunno. I lean towards 250, but it's tough to decide. If I could get a 1tb for under $300 I'd probably go that route, but that isn't likely for the 960.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  19. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    Thanks.

    If I were only having 1 drive, the absolute lowest could go would be 1tb and I'd have to be constantly moving files then.

    So more than likely I am deciding between 250 and 500 and then deciding evo 960 or evo 850. Doubt I'd fool with PRO unless they are on amazing deals where they are same price as EVO.

    So I dunno. I lean towards 250, but it's tough to decide. If I could get a 1tb for under $300 I'd probably go that route, but that isn't likely for the 960.


    250 or 500GB 850 EVO will do you just fine for the OS drive.
    Reply to USAFRet
  20. you sure? some have said the 960 blows it away, which is why I am hesitant. Plus I hate not going ahead and getting current tech for any parts, really. Otherwise, I wouldn't have passed up the deal for 7700k cpu for $242 tow ait on the 8th gen.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  21. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    you sure? some have said the 960 blows it away, which is why I am hesitant. Plus I hate not going ahead and getting current tech for any parts, really. Otherwise, I wouldn't have passed up the deal for 7700k cpu for $242 tow ait on the 8th gen.


    In a lot of use cases, an NVMe drive IS miles faster.
    For the OS drive, faster but not hugely so.

    All SSD's, be they SATA or PCIe, have pretty much zero latency. Access new data now. That is their main advantage over spinning drives.
    NVMe drives shine in moving around large blocks of data. Which is the opposite of how the OS uses it.

    Yes it will be faster. But in normal operations, don't expect 3 or 4 times "faster" to do things.
    Check this comparison video.
    http://www.techspot.com/news/67222-storage-real-world-performance-nvme-vs-sata-vs-hdd.html

    But if it is a small price difference for the same size, go ahead and get the 960.
    Reply to USAFRet
  22. It really comes down to what programs someone uses, as well. Like that 7-zip file extraction test. I remember seeing 7-zip is also a program where your cpu choice makes a big difference, as well.

    Have you heard similar to what I said earlier, though, that bigger sized (space) drives are more stable? That worries me as well.

    Also, judging by some of those comments on there, it looks like even the guy saying you should store videos on a HDD is having his edited videos on the SSD, which makes me figure I should do waht I said and edit videos onto the SSD, then later move them to the HDD. (or in many cases i may be editing and then burning to disc and not even need a backup to stay anywhere).

    Off topic, but hate to make a new topic just for this.... if ripjaws v memory says "z170 platform", is it still going to be fine for z270, z370, the H line, etc...? Is it related to what it allows for overclocking memory or something? (which only z line allows, I guess)
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  23. Bigger drives generally have a longer warranty life. That is due to simply having more space (NAND cells) to shuffle data around for wear leveling.

    But anything 250GB and up will last years.
    Reply to USAFRet
  24. On newegg, it's listing every size of evo 960 as only 3 year warranty, yet 850 has 5 year warranty. And neither of those would be good enough lifespans. I have never had a HDD fail in under 5-7 years.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  25. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    On newegg, it's listing every size of evo 960 as only 3 year warranty, yet 850 has 5 year warranty. And neither of those would be good enough lifespans. I have never had a HDD fail in under 5-7 years.


    I've had HDD's fail in 5 weeks.
    Or last 20 years.

    My house systems are ALL SSD (8 individual drives), except for the NAS box and one cheesy old laptop.

    The eldest SSD is coming up on 6 years old, a Kingston HyperX 120GB. It currently has 41,000+ running hours, and reporting as 99% lifespan left.
    Reply to USAFRet
  26. So do you think and SSD "generally" should last ,longer than a HDD? Is it going to be the same situation where you could have one die quickly or another last 20 years or is it going to be more similar to their warranty levels? Sure a HDD may die quickly, but most people don't have them die at all.

    I have sadly usually lost data from windows issues instead of an actual HDD dying. I had so many tivo shows on a HDD and then windows was messed up and I didn't know solutions and panicked and restored to factory condition and never was successful figuring out file retrieval software.

    I found out later it was some HP issue where a simple tcrl alt del and ending a process would have got windows starting up.

    Then recently windows was not starting up at all and I finally was able to sort it this time by installing win 10 to another partition.

    Pretty sad when you don't have HDD failures and still lose files.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  27. Read here for a long term endurance test:
    http://us.hardware.info/reviews/4178/10/hardwareinfo-tests-lifespan-of-samsung-ssd-840-250gb-tlc-ssd-updated-with-final-conclusion-final-update-20-6-2013

    They've been shown to last far longer than the warranty TBW lifespan.
    In regular consumer use. they would likely die of something else, and not being written to too much.

    I've had 2 physical drives die this century. A WD Green, at the 5 week point. Obviously warranty, and replaced.
    The other was 100% my fault...I dropped it. And it was long out of warranty anyway.

    And for any drive, be it HDD, USB stick, SATA, NVMe....backups are the key thing here.
    Whether the drive dies, or Windows goes south, or you get a nasty virus...a comprehensive backup situation is proof positive against data loss.
    Reply to USAFRet
  28. yeah, I know, and I am still lazily not backing up as much as I should, but far more than I did before this last windows issue.

    I had a usb flash drive die mighty quickly (I think the connector is messed yup or something) and I so badly want to get files off of it because it's files I lost totally off of my pc during that first windows issue and was my own recorded content so obviously can never be replaced. And when I had to do that restore, I lost some great concert footage that I listened to all the time. :(
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  29. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    yeah, I know, and I am still lazily not backing up as much as I should, but far more than I did before this last windows issue.

    I had a usb flash drive die mighty quickly (I think the connector is messed yup or something) and I so badly want to get files off of it because it's files I lost totally off of my pc during that first windows issue and was my own recorded content so obviously can never be replaced. And when I had to do that restore, I lost some great concert footage that I listened to all the time. :(


    Ideally, backups should be all automated and hands off.
    If my system were to go south right now, due to some windows weirdness, I can recover the entire thing, all drives, in exactly the same config as it was at 1AM this morning.
    No "Windows restore " needed or wanted.

    Read here for my personal procedure, and others: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3383768/backup-situation-home.html
    Reply to USAFRet
  30. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    yeah, I know, and I am still lazily not backing up as much as I should, but far more than I did before this last windows issue.

    I had a usb flash drive die mighty quickly (I think the connector is messed yup or something) and I so badly want to get files off of it because it's files I lost totally off of my pc during that first windows issue and was my own recorded content so obviously can never be replaced. And when I had to do that restore, I lost some great concert footage that I listened to all the time. :(


    Someone brought me a bad USB drive, I took the shell off and one of the solder points was broken. Took out my solder iron and soldered the joint back. Plugged it in and bingo! Copied everything off and trashed the drive. If you still have it, try cracking it open and see if you can see a bad joint. Then anyone with solder skills can try to fix it.
    Reply to BadAsAl
  31. BadAsAl said:
    DefinitelyNotTom said:
    yeah, I know, and I am still lazily not backing up as much as I should, but far more than I did before this last windows issue.

    I had a usb flash drive die mighty quickly (I think the connector is messed yup or something) and I so badly want to get files off of it because it's files I lost totally off of my pc during that first windows issue and was my own recorded content so obviously can never be replaced. And when I had to do that restore, I lost some great concert footage that I listened to all the time. :(


    Someone brought me a bad USB drive, I took the shell off and one of the solder points was broken. Took out my solder iron and soldered the joint back. Plugged it in and bingo! Copied everything off and trashed the drive. If you still have it, try cracking it open and see if you can see a bad joint. Then anyone with solder skills can try to fix it.


    would be good timing because I was about to get my cousin to use his solder gun to try to fix my guitar hero guitar.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  32. USAFRet said:
    DefinitelyNotTom said:
    yeah, I know, and I am still lazily not backing up as much as I should, but far more than I did before this last windows issue.

    I had a usb flash drive die mighty quickly (I think the connector is messed yup or something) and I so badly want to get files off of it because it's files I lost totally off of my pc during that first windows issue and was my own recorded content so obviously can never be replaced. And when I had to do that restore, I lost some great concert footage that I listened to all the time. :(


    Ideally, backups should be all automated and hands off.
    If my system were to go south right now, due to some windows weirdness, I can recover the entire thing, all drives, in exactly the same config as it was at 1AM this morning.
    No "Windows restore " needed or wanted.

    Read here for my personal procedure, and others: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3383768/backup-situation-home.html


    I thought about doing that before, but hated to do it with cloud backup. I could just have it back it up to more physical drives of my own though. This last time I would have been really screwed if I didn't fix windows because I didn't even have work data backed up.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  33. Also, if you want to see if you can still retrieve data from your hard drive (assuming you still have it), you can try running GetDataBack Simple on it. It will show you whatever it finds and then you can decide to pay for it if it finds what you are looking for ($80 USD where I live). Used it many times and it is one of the best data recovery solutions.

    You can also try iCare Data Recovery.

    And just so you are aware, data recovery on SSDs is pretty much a no go for non professionals so backups become that much more important if you start using an SSD.
    Reply to BadAsAl
  34. DefinitelyNotTom said:


    I thought about doing that before, but hated to do it with cloud backup. I could just have it back it up to more physical drives of my own though. This last time I would have been really screwed if I didn't fix windows because I didn't even have work data backed up.


    Just one or two USB external dries is good for a start.
    The two key words are 'automated' and 'tested'.

    Having a 'backup' does little good if you don't know how to recover from a disaster.

    Always operate with the mindset that your system is just 0.25 sec away from dying completely.
    How will you recover?

    Hardware is replaceable, often for free. Data isn't.
    Reply to USAFRet
  35. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    USAFRet said:
    DefinitelyNotTom said:
    yeah, I know, and I am still lazily not backing up as much as I should, but far more than I did before this last windows issue.

    I had a usb flash drive die mighty quickly (I think the connector is messed yup or something) and I so badly want to get files off of it because it's files I lost totally off of my pc during that first windows issue and was my own recorded content so obviously can never be replaced. And when I had to do that restore, I lost some great concert footage that I listened to all the time. :(


    Ideally, backups should be all automated and hands off.
    If my system were to go south right now, due to some windows weirdness, I can recover the entire thing, all drives, in exactly the same config as it was at 1AM this morning.
    No "Windows restore " needed or wanted.

    Read here for my personal procedure, and others: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3383768/backup-situation-home.html


    I thought about doing that before, but hated to do it with cloud backup. I could just have it back it up to more physical drives of my own though. This last time I would have been really screwed if I didn't fix windows because I didn't even have work data backed up.


    Notice that for his really important stuff he has a drive that he takes to work with him. This is key. You need some type of offsite backup too. Think catastrophe, flood, fire, tornado, and all your possessions are gone including your external backup drive. I don't do quite the same level of backup as he does but the stuff I absolutely can't lose is on an external USB drive for quick recovery and also in my OneDrive.
    Reply to BadAsAl
  36. Thanks. All good points.

    As for recovery, I tried programs before and it's hard to know what's there because it all has random names instead of their original file names, obviously. I bet by now it's been written voer, but there's always a chance something is left.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  37. I see the 1TB 850 for $269. I'd probably do that if it were the 960. :p
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  38. For some reason nobody ever claims these dell deals... such as these $75 off a $75 purchase ones. but I can't find anything there to buy, so I might as well not claim either. I could get a 250gb evo 960 for under $75, but that is not saving much because I can already get it for under $100 from another site, due to various deals...

    I thought well maybe I could get a noctua cpu cooler, but I guess dell doesn't carry those...

    I wonder if I am forgetting something else I could get there. I'm obviously going to keep being too late to claim higher cash back offers from other, better stores.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  39. Man, I just waste so many deals. I couldn't decide if I wanted anything, so just threw that $75 offer away by letting them all get claimed. And a month ago i claimed a $30 off $30 newegg one and couldn't find anything to buy. So that's $105 I have just tossed away. lol. They do have dell ones quite often, though, so maybe it will show up again. The $250 amazon ones are too hard to get claimed even if you click the button within 1 second.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  40. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    Man, I just waste so many deals. I couldn't decide if I wanted anything, so just threw that $75 offer away by letting them all get claimed. And a month ago i claimed a $30 off $30 newegg one and couldn't find anything to buy. So that's $105 I have just tossed away. lol. They do have dell ones quite often, though, so maybe it will show up again. The $250 amazon ones are too hard to get claimed even if you click the button within 1 second.


    Where are you claiming these deals from?
    Reply to USAFRet
  41. couponcabin. it is apparently legitimate, if you do everything right such as disabling ad blockers and accepting cookies. But you can only claim 1 per 30 days, so I hated to claim the dell one and just skipped it.

    How much difference in price do you feel is worth it to get a 960 vs. an 850? For 250gb, the price difference I can get in only about $30 difference. For 500gb, the difference in price is a lot more. For 1tb it's VERY muich difference in price.

    I think I could get a 500gb 850 for not much more than a 250gb 960,. but the again I probably don't need more than the 250gb.

    I even thought about getting TWO 250 solid state drives because I could have done it for a combined $175 that way for the 960.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  42. Does storage size affect quality of the SSD for both the 850 and 960 or not?

    Some had claimed the 500gb and above are better and last longer.

    Also, someone said the 850 has multiple versions fore the same storage size and one is bewtter than the other. Is that the case for the 960 also?
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  43. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    Does storage size affect quality of the SSD for both the 850 and 960 or not?

    Some had claimed the 500gb and above are better and last longer.

    Also, someone said the 850 has multiple versions fore the same storage size and one is bewtter than the other. Is that the case for the 960 also?


    Larger drives are marginally 'faster' than smaller. Not so you'd notice, though.
    Larger drives have a greater TBW in the warranty.
    A 250GB drive may have a TBW of 75TB, a 500GB drive a TBW of 150TB, before you reach the warranty limit.
    Again, though...not that you personally would actually reach that Total Bytes Written limit in normal use.

    My main PC has 5 SSD's, of varying sizes. The eldest being almost 6 years old.
    Totaling the use of ALL of them does not reach to 1/2 of the 75TBW limit of one of the 250GB 840 EVO drives.
    Not even remotely worried about it.
    Reply to USAFRet
  44. Those differences seam meaningless, as you also implied. Someone would have to be just constantly creating huge files and deleting them for a longgggggg time to reach those warranty limits. All I know is someone said he would never buy a 250gb, but I could technically get one for around $20 due to cashback offers!

    Also, someone said the 850 had a TLC version and MLC. Which is beter, how do you know which is which, how big od a difference is it, and is that only for the 850, not the 960?
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  45. DefinitelyNotTom said:
    Those differences seam meaningless, as you also implied. Someone would have to be just constantly creating huge files and deleting them for a longgggggg time to reach those warranty limits. All I know is someone said he would never buy a 250gb, but I could technically get one for around $20 due to cashback offers!

    Also, someone said the 850 had a TLC version and MLC. Which is beter, how do you know which is which, how big od a difference is it, and is that only for the 850, not the 960?


    Disregard TLC vs MLC. Mostly meaningless in the consumer space.
    Size? Depends on use. A 250GB SSD for the OS driveis good, if you have other drives in the system. As the only drive, it is too small.
    Reply to USAFRet
  46. Thanks. Yeah, for an only drive I wouldn't ever go below 1tb and even recent deals on the 1tb evo 850 were around $260, which is still too much to be spending, when I could get a 250gb ssd and a hdd with multiple tb for not even CLOSE to that price. Especially since I can get one deal at google express to save what amounts to approximately $50 and another deal at dell on onf htese various deals that keep popping up for $50-$75 back. So I could buy a SSD at one of those and a HDD at the other and probably be out around $50 for a lot more space than the 1 tb one (and have the ssd as well).

    If the only differences are what you said where TLC and MLC don't matter much and sizes don't matter much (as far as performance), then a lot of people must be fooled because many keep acting like it's very important.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  47. Personally, I prefer a small drive for the OS and applications, other drives for other things.
    250/500GB SSD, and then whatever else fits in the budget for the others.
    Reply to USAFRet
  48. That is personally how I feel at the moment. I just doubt I'd need more than 250 on the ssd. But then again 500 would be extra safe in case in the future I have different demands for the ssd.

    Even if some program is best to create a file on the ssd, I could then just transfer it to the HDD to free up space, anyway.... because it would just be videos.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
  49. With the google express deal I could get the 250gb 850 for $79 after all fees or the same size 960 for $95, so the question is whether or not the 960 is worth $16 extra. My guess would be yes for such a low price diff. or i could wait around for another of these deal offers (I passed one up today) and get the 960 for about $70 or the 850 for around $30 I think.

    I am not planning on building a pc for months, though, so kind of hate to spend the money and maybe would rather use the offers for something else, such as video games or movies or something. Or like I said, I could use one deal for a ssd and another deal for a hdd and I could probably get both combined for well under $100.
    Reply to DefinitelyNotTom
Ask a new question Answer

Read More

SSD Storage Hard Drives