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Intel X299, Kaby Lake-X & Skylake-X MegaThread! FAQ and Resources

Welcome to the Official Intel X299 MegaThread! This thread will be the main location for all X299 discussion and information!

This thread serves as the primary discussion thread for all X299 information and resources. While discussing, please remember to stay within the guidelines set by Tom's Hardware and above all, DO NOT start a flame war.


General Info:
X299 serves as the successor to the X99 chipset for the high end enthusiast platform, this involves a brand new chipset and socket, moving from the last 2011-3 socket to the new 2066 socket. Along with this change comes a host of new CPUs, known as Skylake-X and Kaby Lake-X. For the first time on a HEDT platform, there is now a Core i5 CPU, the i5-7640X, featuring 4 cores and 4 threads. Also new is the Core i9 CPU, effectively replacing Core I7 Extreme Edition processors of previous generations which feature 10 to 18 cores depending on the model number. The Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X are Kaby Lake-X, while the rest are Skylake-X. There are major differences between the two lower tier CPUs and the rest of the lineup, which will be discussed in the Architecture section.

Performance:
Starting off with Artificial benchmarks, the Core i9 outshines every current desktop CPU on the market, in both single and multi-threaded applications. Past that, the Core i7’s battle head to head with AMD’s Ryzen 7 1800X. In single threaded tests, such as Cinebench R15, Ryzen falls behind, but in the multi-threaded variant, beats all but the (lastCore i7-6950X and the Core i9-7900X. Gaming-wise, Ryzen tends to take last place, but only by several frames. (See sources for Benchmark Graphs)

Memory Support:
Here is where things get interesting. Intel has decided that the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X only have support for Dual Channel Memory, instead of the classic quad-channel found on the last HEDT platform. This means that motherboards with 8 RAM slots not be used at full capacity due to this.

Intel has also increased the native memory frequency support for all Kaby Lake-X CPUs and Skylake-X CPUs to DDR4 2666MHz. The only exception being the Core i7-7800X which tops out at DDR4 2400MHz.

Architecture (talk about the i5s and i7s and the issues with memory/PCIe lanes):
For the first time ever, Intel has added their mainstream CPUs to the HEDT platform, in the form of Kaby-Lake X. The Core i5-7640X and the Core i7-7740X are speced identically to their Kaby Lake counterparts, those being the Core i5-7600K and Core i7-7700K, the only exception being high clock speeds and higher TDPs on the Kaby Lake-X variants.

Meanwhile Skylake-X CPUs are where Intel’s "true" extreme edition CPUs lie at, with base models featuring 6 cores and the most powerful variants featuring a massive 18 cores and 36 threads.

The Core i7 Skylake-X CPUs have up to 28 PCI-E lanes while the Core i9 CPUs all have the full 44 PCI-E lane configurations. Then the two Kaby Lake-X CPUs have just the 16 PCI-E lane configuration.

Another interesting note is that Intel has decided, for the first time on the HEDT platform, to instead use thermal paste, rather than solder/liquid metal, meaning that some people may want to delid their Kaby Lake-X or Skylake-X CPUs to add liquid metal to lower temperatures. A review by German overclocker, der8auer, talks about VRM heat issues with multiple x299 boards.

Lastly, an RFID chip has been found on the Skylake-X CPUs which is discussed in another of der8auer’s video’s. This is the first finding on this chip, a PiROM, on a HEDT CPU, as they were normally on higher end Xeons only. One of the use-cases is inventory, showing stuff such as serial numbers, model numbers.

Motherboards:
Motherboards have already been launched from major companies, such as ASUS, MSI, Gigabyte, ASRock, etc. This list has only some of the boards available:

ASUS:
ASUS Prime X299-Deluxe
ASUS TUF X299 MARK I
ASUS TUF X299 MARK 2
ASRock:
ASRock X299 Taichi
ASRock X299 Killer SLI/ac
Gigabyte (AORUS Branding):
GIGABYTE AORUS X299 AORUS Gaming 7
GIGABYTE AORUS X299 AORUS Gaming 3
MSI:
MSI X299 GAMING PRO CARBON AC
MSI X299 GAMING M7 ACK
EVGA:
EVGA X299 Micro 131-SX-E295-KR

Links (Benchmarks & Reviews):

Intel's Core X-series CPUs and X299 platform revealed
The Intel Skylake-X Review: Core i9 7900X, i7 7820X and i7 7800X Tested
Intel ‘Core-X Series’ Skylake-X CPUs, Kaby Lake-X CPUs and X299 Motherboards Available For Pre-Orders
Intel i9 7900X Skylake-X Review
The X299 VRM Disaster (en) by der8auer
The ongoing testing of Intel's X299 and i9-7900X
The RFID chip on Intels Skylake-X (PIROM) by der8auer


----
First megathread please be nice.
Reply to XxD34THxX
185 answers Last reply
More about intel x299 kaby lake skylake megathread faq resources
  1. Everything but the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X are Skylake-X, doesn't make much sense to me? Why would they use Skylake in their i9 CPUs rather than Kabylake? Wouldn't Skylake have a lower IPC?
    Reply to turkey3_scratch
  2. Placeholder for notifications in the thread.

    But, for what it's worth, I think the CPU overhaul they did is interesting and shows promise. Problem is for the overall platform: the decisions Intel made for X299 and Skylake X are detrimental and nonsensical to a degree for consumers, to say the least.

    Cheers!

    EDIT: OMG, my grammar...
    Reply to Yuka
  3. Yuka said:
    Placeholder for notifications in the thread.

    But, for what it's worth, I think the CPU is overhaul they did is interesting and shows promise. Problem is for the overall platform: the decisions Intel made for X299 and Skylake X are detrimental and nonsensical to a degree for consumers, to say the least.

    Cheers!


    FYI, all you need is the " Track this thread" on the first post to get notification
    Reply to rgd1101
  4. rgd1101 said:
    Yuka said:
    Placeholder for notifications in the thread.

    But, for what it's worth, I think the CPU is overhaul they did is interesting and shows promise. Problem is for the overall platform: the decisions Intel made for X299 and Skylake X are detrimental and nonsensical to a degree for consumers, to say the least.

    Cheers!


    FYI, all you need is the " Track this thread" on the first post to get notification


    BLACK MAGIC!
    Reply to Yuka
  5. turkey3_scratch said:
    Everything but the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X are Skylake-X, doesn't make much sense to me? Why would they use Skylake in their i9 CPUs rather than Kabylake? Wouldn't Skylake have a lower IPC?


    This is pure speculation on my part but I think with the massive pull ahead they did with the LGA2066 and x299, someone "thought" they needed something for the lower end of the x299 spectrum. You are correct though, it doesn't make any sense, especially with Coffee Lake and Cannon Lake (replacement for LGA1151?) coming supposedly in Q1 of 2018.

    I make no bones about it, I am an Intel fan but they surely screwed this launch and it has hurt them. Is this the so called "end of Intel" as many AMD fanboys have proclaimed? Nope not even close. Hopefully it is going to wake the giant.

    As a side note. Asus has removed the X299 Rampage VI Extreme and Apex from their website. Not a good sign.
    Reply to Wizard61
  6. turkey3_scratch said:
    Everything but the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X are Skylake-X, doesn't make much sense to me? Why would they use Skylake in their i9 CPUs rather than Kabylake? Wouldn't Skylake have a lower IPC?


    Kabylake has same IPC than Skylake.

    Skylake-X is a different microarchitecture than Skylake. Skylake-X is optimized for server and workstation workloads.

    Wizard61 said:
    As a side note. Asus has removed the X299 Rampage VI Extreme and Apex from their website. Not a good sign.


    Asus mobos are defective.
    Reply to juanrga
  7. XxD34THxX said:
    Performance:Starting off with Artificial benchmarks, the Core i9 outshines every current desktop CPU on the market, in both single and multi-threaded applications. Past that, the Core i7’s battle head to head with AMD’s Ryzen 7 1800X. In single threaded tests, such as Cinebench R15, Ryzen falls behind, but in the multi-threaded variant, beats all but the (lastCore i7-6950X and the Core i9-7900X.


    It is not true that 8-core RyZen beats all except the 10-core Broadwell and the 10-core Skylake-X. The RyZen 1800X is loosing to 8-core Skylake-X in multithreaded benches as well. A pair of examples with 8-core i7-7820X beating RyZen 1800X




    There are also a pair of special cases where the 6-core i7 7800X beats the 8-core RyZen 1800X in multithreading



    Game benches would be taken with a grain of salt now. Many reviews tested Skylake-X with beta/buggy BIOS with broken turbo 3.0 and other aspects that affected performance in latency sensitive workloads. Several reviews got that the X-series performed worse than Broadwell-E on games, whereas other reviews found just the opposite.

    Sites like TT tested the i9 with both an older BIOS and with an updated BIOS and found significant performance improvements




    Quote:
    The issue is that the normal 7900K results were done on older BIOS versions, while the new ones are done on the latest BIOS versions that support Turbo 3 without any software requirements. You will see results in line with the better performing 7900X results, but I do know some other media who were getting the same low gaming scores I was, and that was because Turbo 3 wasn't working. Memory increase from 2133Mhz to 2666Mhz with the same timings also makes a difference in the gaming results. Ashes of Singularity is one of our outliers, but that is most likely because they have to optimize the code for the CPU, just like had to be done for Ryzen.


    However, current BIOS are not still working correctly and some sites delayed their game reviews

    http://www.pcgamer.com/the-ongoing-testing-of-intels-x299-and-i9-7900x/
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/11550/the-intel-skylakex-review-core-i9-7900x-i7-7820x-and-i7-7800x-tested/7

    XxD34THxX said:
    Gaming-wise, Ryzen tends to take last place, but only by several frames. (See sources for Benchmark Graphs)


    On non-GPU-bottleneck situations RyZen 1800X continues being a good 20% behind


    Reply to juanrga
  8. juanrga said:

    Asus mobos are defective.


    That is a pretty broad brush that you are using there. I have been using ASUS motherboards for years and I have not had a defective one as of yet. Are they 100% perfect? Nope, but they do make a quality product.
    Reply to Wizard61
  9. Wizard61 said:
    juanrga said:

    Asus mobos are defective.


    That is a pretty broad brush that you are using there. I have been using ASUS motherboards for years and I have not had a defective one as of yet. Are they 100% perfect? Nope, but they do make a quality product.


    Check the context. I mean the X299 ones that are giving problems. Eliminating the VRM 'heatshink' (which is really acting as an insulator and increasing temperatures up to extreme values) and cooling that zone solves the problem. It is a design fault. Asus engineers will solve it soon.
    Reply to juanrga
  10. juanrga said:
    Check the context. I mean the X299 ones that are giving problems. Eliminating the VRM 'heatshink' (which is really acting as an insulator and increasing temperatures up to extreme values) and cooling that zone solves the problem. It is a design fault. Asus engineers will solve it soon.


    The problem is is that all x299 boards are showing the same issues. That tells me that this isn't just an ASUS issue but something deeper that all the board makers did not take into consideration, and yes this is an issue directly related to Intel pulling the release ahead by at least 5 months. I firmly believe that the x299 was also supposed to bring PCIe 4.0 along withe the LGA2066 socket to the market, but again with the release pull ahead, not everything was fully tested or implemented. Hence why the x299 boards work fine with stock CPUs but fail with overclocked.

    There will probably be a v1.5 board with a fix for the VRM heat issue and then a v2.0 board that will have PCIe 4.0 that will land before christmas. Vega is purported to support PCIe 4.0 so this makes sense.
    Reply to Wizard61
  11. juanrga said:
    turkey3_scratch said:
    Everything but the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X are Skylake-X, doesn't make much sense to me? Why would they use Skylake in their i9 CPUs rather than Kabylake? Wouldn't Skylake have a lower IPC?


    Kabylake has same IPC than Skylake.

    Skylake-X is a different microarchitecture than Skylake. Skylake-X is optimized for server and workstation workloads


    Is the Skylake-X microarchitecture the same as Kabylake-X then? Do they both have the same IPC?
    Reply to turkey3_scratch
  12. turkey3_scratch said:
    juanrga said:
    turkey3_scratch said:
    Everything but the Core i5-7640X and Core i7-7740X are Skylake-X, doesn't make much sense to me? Why would they use Skylake in their i9 CPUs rather than Kabylake? Wouldn't Skylake have a lower IPC?


    Kabylake has same IPC than Skylake.

    Skylake-X is a different microarchitecture than Skylake. Skylake-X is optimized for server and workstation workloads


    Is the Skylake-X microarchitecture the same as Kabylake-X then? Do they both have the same IPC?


    This is all a confusing mesh.

    Kabylake-X is the same microarchitecture than Kabylake and Skylake, the IPC is the same for the three.

    Skylake-X is a different microarchitecture than Skylake or Kabylake, the IPC of Skylake-X is different.
    Reply to juanrga
  13. The default mesh clocking policies also affect performance in games

    Reply to juanrga
  14. Doesn't the vrm and heatsink defect in the current crop of x299 motherboards kinda degrade/invalidate the reviews of the only 2 boards done on this site so far?
    Reply to Phaaze88
  15. Reply to Phaaze88
  16. Phaaze88 said:


    In rare fashion, I'll give Intel the benefit of the doubt there. If their process is not working as expected for this initial batch, they might be trying to save face and present the current best as the future average when their process is better.

    Cheers!
    Reply to Yuka
  17. Yuka said:
    Phaaze88 said:


    In rare fashion, I'll give Intel the benefit of the doubt there. If their process is not working as expected for this initial batch, they might be trying to save face and present the current best as the future average when their process is better.

    Cheers!


    Hey, hey! That's then, this is NOW. If it is as you say, then that could take a long time binning for the 12+ core models(the more cores you add, the harder the binning process). Once they're all out, the 7900x will probably still have the best price/performance ratio OF INTEL CHIPS(but if you're spending on Intel, you're not too concerned about $$$ anyway). I'm avoiding it because I won't be able to sustain a 4.5+ oc on air(nh-d15s dual fan mode). Besides, why bring up something that technically doesn't exist? :P
    Reply to Phaaze88
  18. Phaaze88 said:
    Hey, hey! That's then, this is NOW. If it is as you say, then that could take a long time binning for the 12+ core models(the more cores you add, the harder the binning process). Once they're all out, the 7900x will probably still have the best price/performance ratio OF INTEL CHIPS(but if you're spending on Intel, you're not too concerned about $$$ anyway). I'm avoiding it because I won't be able to sustain a 4.5+ oc on air(nh-d15s dual fan mode). Besides, why bring up something that technically doesn't exist? :P


    It does exist. It was benchmarked. What you call "current cheery/golden" I call "future average". I'm not saying it is the right thing to do, nor that it should be done, but Intel is Intel. They'll save face whenever they can and market out of any guilt and bad press. On the other hand, they've never done it before, have they? I can't remember if they have. They're not the ones that usually send "golden" samples to reviewers, right?

    Cheers!
    Reply to Yuka
  19. sweclockers review of the 10-core Sylake-X is out. It seems they also used the last BIOS version and gaming looks good, except on CIV 6.






    Reply to juanrga
  20. 250W including VRM, without AVX512 offset for a 4.5GHz 10C is a very good measurement.
    Reply to juanrga
  21. Core i7-7800X vs. 7700K, 6 or 4-Cores for Gaming?
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 12, 2017
    "if you are a gamer get the 7700k or alternatively look to AMD's Ryzen Line-up"
    In the CPU chart I messed up the core counts, they are the wrong way around. To make up for it here have a stupid big video index....

    VIDEO INDEX
    0:06 - Welcome
    1:10 - CPU Specs
    2:13 - World of Tanks
    2:39 - Grand Theft Auto V
    3:06 - PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds
    3:27 - The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt
    3:40 - Rise of the Tomb Raider
    4:04 - Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation
    4:22 - Far Cry Primal
    4:59 - Tom Clancy's The Division
    5:12 - Hitman
    5:39 - Quantum Break
    5:51 - Overwatch
    6:04 - DOOM
    6:28 - Total War: Warhammer
    6:46 - Mirror's Edge Catalyst
    6:59 - F1 2016
    7:13 - Deus Ex: Mankind Divided
    7:27 - Battlefield 1
    7:41 - Mafia III
    7:58 - Gears of War 4
    8:10 - Titanfall 2
    8:22 - Civilization VI
    8:44 - Dishonored 2
    8:55 - WATCH_DOGS2
    9:06 - Resident Evil 7
    9:19 - For Honor
    9:33 - Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Wildlands
    9:42 - Mass Effect: Andromeda
    9:55 - Dawn of War III
    10:12 - Prey
    10:30 - DiRT 4
    10:44 - Power
    11:34 - Average
    11:52 - 30 Game side-by-side Comparison
    13:06 - Conclusion
    14:59 - Outro
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKX9Bcxnd7U
    Reply to goldstone77
  22. Planning to update the megathread OP with fixes and such after I return from an unplanned trip.
    Reply to XxD34THxX
  23. I regret nothing.


    I may actually replace the Prime with the Rampage once it's out.
    Reply to Phaaze88
  24. The Skylake-X Mess Explored: Thermal Paste And Runaway Power
    by Igor Wallossek July 10, 2017 at 6:00 AM
    "In the wake of Skylake-X's introduction and disappointing results from our overclocking attempts, we put a lot of thought into the power and thermal issues plaguing Intel's highest-end desktop CPUs. These roadblocks boil down to a couple of salient points that we'd like to explore in as much depth as possible:
    (1) Skylake-X at its stock settings can barely be cooled during normal operation. This is due to its power consumption being extremely high in some situations, and its thermal paste keeping waste heat from being dissipated effectively.
    (2) There’s barely any room for enthusiasts to overclock. Also, many motherboards limit Skylake-X CPUs further due to poor design choices, such as insufficient VRM cooling. Those looking for high overclocks need not apply."

    "Manual Overclocking & Conclusion
    The Motherboard Manufacturers’ Duty
    Ultimately, we’re looking at power consumption numbers similar to some high-end graphics cards when we start messing with Skylake-X. AMD’s FX-9590X doesn’t even come close to these results, if that means anything to you. This means motherboard manufacturers need to start spending money on better components and cooling solutions to take care of those components. Otherwise, long-term reliability will be hard to guarantee. Ultra-durable and military-class components don't have to be exclusive to top-end products; they can bolster mid-range platforms, too."
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/-intel-skylake-x-overclocking-thermal-issues,5117.html?utm_source=th-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20170714-th
    Reply to goldstone77
  25. goldstone77 said:
    Core i7-7800X vs. 7700K, 6 or 4-Cores for Gaming?
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 12, 2017
    "if you are a gamer get the 7700k or alternatively look to AMD's Ryzen Line-up"




    We can see that the the current king of gaming is only 8% faster than the 7800X at 1080p. That is amazing considering that the X-series was not designed for gaming. The six-core for gaming is the forthcoming CofeeLake. On professional stuff the gap between the 7800x and the 7700k is enormous






    Therefore whereas awaiting for CoffeLake the recommendation seems to be

    1) If you are ONLY a gamer get the 7700k.
    2) If you play games and do professional stuff then go for the 7800X.
    3) If you play games whereas doing background stuff as streaming then go for the 7800X.

    The only exception to the rule 1 is if you are only interested in playing well-threaded games that do use of the extra cores.

    Reply to juanrga
  26. goldstone77 said:
    The Skylake-X Mess Explored: Thermal Paste And Runaway Power
    by Igor Wallossek July 10, 2017 at 6:00 AM
    "In the wake of Skylake-X's introduction and disappointing results from our overclocking attempts, we put a lot of thought into the power and thermal issues plaguing Intel's highest-end desktop CPUs. These roadblocks boil down to a couple of salient points that we'd like to explore in as much depth as possible:
    (1) Skylake-X at its stock settings can barely be cooled during normal operation. This is due to its power consumption being extremely high in some situations, and its thermal paste keeping waste heat from being dissipated effectively.
    (2) There’s barely any room for enthusiasts to overclock. Also, many motherboards limit Skylake-X CPUs further due to poor design choices, such as insufficient VRM cooling. Those looking for high overclocks need not apply."

    "Manual Overclocking & Conclusion
    The Motherboard Manufacturers’ Duty
    Ultimately, we’re looking at power consumption numbers similar to some high-end graphics cards when we start messing with Skylake-X. AMD’s FX-9590X doesn’t even come close to these results, if that means anything to you. This means motherboard manufacturers need to start spending money on better components and cooling solutions to take care of those components. Otherwise, long-term reliability will be hard to guarantee. Ultra-durable and military-class components don't have to be exclusive to top-end products; they can bolster mid-range platforms, too."
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/-intel-skylake-x-overclocking-thermal-issues,5117.html?utm_source=th-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20170714-th


    Professional overclockers as der8auer have shown that thermal paste is excellent and that delidding and applying liquid soldier only brings 4% extra overclocking capability.

    Yes, a 10-core Skylake-X consumes lots of power when using AVX-512 units.... because AVX512 provides a lot of performance



    About 3x faster than 8-core RyZen, which has 8 x 256bit units, whereas the FX-9590 has only 4 x 256bit units.

    Similar power consumption for ~6x higher performance is an excellent in my book.
    Reply to juanrga
  27. juanrga said:
    Therefore whereas awaiting for CoffeLake the recommendation seems to be

    1) If you are ONLY a gamer get the 7700k.
    2) If you play games and do professional stuff then go for the 7800X.
    3) If you play games whereas doing background stuff as streaming then go for the 7800X.

    The only exception to the rule 1 is if you are only interested in playing well-threaded games that do use of the extra cores.


    Really? In your mind there's nothing but Intel now?

    Cheers!
    Reply to Yuka
  28. This is an Intel thread and I am replying to a review of 7000k vs 7800X...
    Reply to juanrga
  29. Even a tomshardware.com review doesn't have a chance here... wow...
    Reply to goldstone77
  30. juanrga said:
    goldstone77 said:
    Core i7-7800X vs. 7700K, 6 or 4-Cores for Gaming?
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 12, 2017
    "if you are a gamer get the 7700k or alternatively look to AMD's Ryzen Line-up"




    We can see that the the current king of gaming is only 8% faster than the 7800X at 1080p. That is amazing considering that the X-series was not designed for gaming. The six-core for gaming is the forthcoming CofeeLake. On professional stuff the gap between the 7800x and the 7700k is enormous






    Therefore whereas awaiting for CoffeLake the recommendation seems to be

    1) If you are ONLY a gamer get the 7700k.
    2) If you play games and do professional stuff then go for the 7800X.
    3) If you play games whereas doing background stuff as streaming then go for the 7800X.

    The only exception to the rule 1 is if you are only interested in playing well-threaded games that do use of the extra cores.



    Are you seriously comparing 10-12 cores to 8 cores?

    Really?
    Reply to 8350rocks
  31. 8350rocks said:
    juanrga said:
    goldstone77 said:
    Core i7-7800X vs. 7700K, 6 or 4-Cores for Gaming?
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 12, 2017
    "if you are a gamer get the 7700k or alternatively look to AMD's Ryzen Line-up"




    We can see that the the current king of gaming is only 8% faster than the 7800X at 1080p. That is amazing considering that the X-series was not designed for gaming. The six-core for gaming is the forthcoming CofeeLake. On professional stuff the gap between the 7800x and the 7700k is enormous






    Therefore whereas awaiting for CoffeLake the recommendation seems to be

    1) If you are ONLY a gamer get the 7700k.
    2) If you play games and do professional stuff then go for the 7800X.
    3) If you play games whereas doing background stuff as streaming then go for the 7800X.

    The only exception to the rule 1 is if you are only interested in playing well-threaded games that do use of the extra cores.



    Are you seriously comparing 10-12 cores to 8 cores?

    Really?


    It is evident I am comparing the performance of i7-7800X vs. i7-7700K. One has 6 cores and the other has 4 cores.
    Reply to juanrga
  32. PC Perspective Podcast #458 - 07/13/17
    pcper
    0:47:10 GIGABYTE X299 AORUS Gaming 3 Motherboard Preview
    Published on Jul 13, 2017
    They also discuss the problem with VRM's across the board with all X299 manufactures.
    Reply to goldstone77


  33. So Skylake-X is the best architecture for gaming after all (except in some games).
    Reply to Gon Freecss
  34. Looks like the only reason they are lacking in some games is just optimizations.
    Reply to goldstone77

  35. AMD Ryzen 5 1600 vs. Intel Core i7-7800X: 30 Game Battle!
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 21, 2017


    Ryzen 1600 is tough to beat when it comes to price, performance, and power consumption.
    Price has increase on this model to around $210, but B350 motherboards are still under $100.
    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/mV98TW/amd-ryzen-5-1600-32ghz-6-core-processor-yd1600bbaebox

    The 7800X is a tough sell when vs the 1600 when it comes to price, performance, and power consumption.
    Price on the 7800X will cost north of $400, and a motherboard in the neighborhood of $250.
    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ymtWGX/intel-core-i7-7800x-35ghz-6-core-processor-bx80673i77800x
    Reply to goldstone77
  36. goldstone77 said:



    AMD Ryzen 5 1600 vs. Intel Core i7-7800X: 30 Game Battle!
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 21, 2017


    Ryzen 1600 is tough to beat when it comes to price, performance, and power consumption.
    Price has increase on this model to around $210, but B350 motherboards are still under $100.
    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/mV98TW/amd-ryzen-5-1600-32ghz-6-core-processor-yd1600bbaebox

    The 7800X is a tough sell when vs the 1600 when it comes to price, performance, and power consumption.
    Price on the 7800X will cost north of $400, and a motherboard in the neighborhood of $250.
    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ymtWGX/intel-core-i7-7800x-35ghz-6-core-processor-bx80673i77800x


    Considering that they tested several GPU-bound games and some few games that were frame-capped, it is not surprising that overclocking the 7800X by 34% only brings 3% extra performance compared to stock 7800X: the CPU is not demonstrating its real performance, because it is being bottlenecked by the rest.

    Also we know that SKL-X was run with stock clocks on the mesh interconnect, whereas the RyZen chip was tested with IF interconnect overclocked by using 3200MHz RAM. Overclocking the mesh on SKL-X can improve gaming performance by double digit percents compared to stock settings



    Finally, I doubt people will be purchasing the X-series chip only for gaming. The main target is people that does professional stuff and occasionally play games. On professional tasks the six-core 7800X is able to beat the top 8-core RyZen


    Reply to juanrga
  37. Intel Core i9-7960X 16 Core / 32 Threads ‘Skylake-X’ Processor (Eng Sample) Geekbench 4.0 Score Leaked
    Author Photo
    By Usman Pirzada
    8 hours ago
    "Geekbench performance of Intel’s $1699 Core i9-7960X CPU leaked – Appears to be an under-clocked engineering sample
    The processor scores 5238 points in single core results and 33672 points in the multi core results. While these would be very impressive numbers for any other chip, these are much lower than expected for the 16 core part. In fact, if you take a look at the scores earned by the Core i9-7900X (which is a 10 Core / 20 Thread part) you will see similar performance in almost all categories except the Floating Point and Memory category. The reason for this is obvious – the chip appears to be clocked at 2.5 GHz, which is a very low clock even considering this is a 16 core part."

    "The benchmark was conducted on the 21st of July, 2017, 2 days ago. The test system has the following specifications:

    OS: Windows 10 64 bit
    Motherboard: ASUS PRIME X299-Deluxe
    RAM: 32 GB
    CPU: Core i9-7960X (16 Cores / 32 Threads)
    CPU Clock: 2.51 GHz (All-Core)
    L1 Cache: 1 MB
    L2 Cache: 16 MB
    L3 Cache: 22.5 MB
    We also learn something new about the Core i9-7960X from these specifications. Intel has previously not revealed the L3 Cache size of the processor but we can see now that it will be 22.5 MB. This is in accordance to the leaks that we have seen previously and basically acts as a confirmation for the same. As far as competition from AMD goes (and even a comparison to the older Skylake-X parts), I took the liberty of adding AMD’s Threadripper 1950X score in the following chart as well (which is also a 16 Core / 32 Thread part):"



    "As you can see Core i9-7900X currently leads the charts in terms of performance per $ (as far as Geekbench v4.0 result goes). Keep in mind however, that these results are very different from compute benchmarks such as the Cinebench R15 where the Threadripper parts vastly outperform Intel’s. In those scenarios, AMD parts are roughly 40% better performance per dollar based on Cinebench numbers for the AMD Threadripper parts. Since a very large market exists for rendering applications for these chips, they are going to sell like hot cakes. AMD has indeed brought the world of high core count CPUs into the hands of the average consumer.

    The Core i9-7960X however, has an absolutely abysmal price/performance ratio at these numbers. The only explanation for this score is that this is an engineering sample and judging from the 2.5 GHz clock rate – that seems very probable. A clock rate increase (all-core) of 500 MHz is expected at the very least if the final retail versions are to have any hope of a meaningful value proposition. You can check out the complete Geekbench score over here."

    http://wccftech.com/intel-core-i9-7960x-skylake-x-processor-geekbench-4-0-score-leaked/
    Reply to goldstone77
  38. Intel Mesh, Does Overclocking it Fix Skylake-X?
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 19, 2017
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTQ6ymQIY64
    3GHz Mesh overclock
    Reply to goldstone77
  39. goldstone77 said:
    Intel Mesh, Does Overclocking it Fix Skylake-X?
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Jul 19, 2017
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTQ6ymQIY64
    3GHz Mesh overclock


    As demonstrated above they tested in GPU-bound and frame-limited situations. This is the reason why overclocking the 7800X by 34% only brings 3% extra performance compared to stock. On such situations it doesn't matter if we push the core to 5GHz, the uncore to 3.2GHz or if we replace the CPU by one was 10x faster. The FPS will remain similar because the CPU is being bottlenecked by the rest of the system/configuration. When the CPU is not bottlenecked, overclocking the mesh brings up to double digit percent gains compared to stick settings

    Reply to juanrga
  40. Anandtech's review for the weird family members of the HEDT platform:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/11549/the-intel-kaby-lake-x-i7-7740x-and-i5-7640x-review-the-new-single-thread-champion-oc-to-5ghz

    Cheers!

    EDIT: My i7 2700K is still king of the hill for games! lol
    Reply to Yuka
  41. Toms' take on the i7 7820X: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i7-7820x-skylake-x,5127.html

    Interesting information there as well.

    Boiling lake indeed.

    Cheers!
    Reply to Yuka
  42. Leak on the higher core models

    Reply to juanrga
  43. The hardware unboxed 30 game Battle is clearly wrong because overclocking the i7-7800X by 34% did only bring 3% higher framerates.

    The author now acknowledges there was some problem with his review



    However, the problem is not in the SKL-X chip because the KBL chips was also bottlenecked. He overclocked the kabylake chip by 16% and performance only increased by 2%. The problem is in another part. He tested in frame-limiting and GPU-bound situations and that is why overclocking the Intel chips didn't bring any sensible performance gain.
    Reply to juanrga
  44. juanrga said:
    The hardware unboxed 30 game Battle is clearly wrong because overclocking the i7-7800X by 34% did only bring 3% higher framerates.

    The author now acknowledges there was some problem with his review



    However, the problem is not in the SKL-X chip because the KBL chips was also bottlenecked. He overclocked the kabylake chip by 16% and performance only increased by 2%. The problem is in another part. He tested in frame-limiting and GPU-bound situations and that is why overclocking the Intel chips didn't bring any sensible performance gain.


    Juan you forgot to mention that Hardware Unboxed also included this picture of his overclocked 7800X!



    https://twitter.com/HardwareUnboxed/status/888225519141093376

    Referenced from the pinned comment
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfNMn7RWgLw&feature=youtu.be
    Reply to goldstone77
  45. goldstone77 said:
    juanrga said:
    The hardware unboxed 30 game Battle is clearly wrong because overclocking the i7-7800X by 34% did only bring 3% higher framerates.

    The author now acknowledges there was some problem with his review



    However, the problem is not in the SKL-X chip because the KBL chips was also bottlenecked. He overclocked the kabylake chip by 16% and performance only increased by 2%. The problem is in another part. He tested in frame-limiting and GPU-bound situations and that is why overclocking the Intel chips didn't bring any sensible performance gain.


    Juan you forgot to mention that Hardware Unboxed also included this picture of his overclocked 7800X!



    https://twitter.com/HardwareUnboxed/status/888225519141093376

    Referenced from the pinned comment
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfNMn7RWgLw&feature=youtu.be


    I knew that image and I didn't mention it because I think it is irrelevant to my point about how in his review both Intel chips were seriously bottlenecked, and not showing real performance. There are, however, people that thinks differently

    Quote:
    If motherboard does that to CPU i am not trusting that CPU performing properly in the first place.


    Thanks for the twitter link. Hardware Unboxed finally admitted that didn't test a retail 7800X chip:

    Quote:
    It's an ES sample :D Well QS sample but still warranty isn't the issue here ;)
    Reply to juanrga
  46. juanrga said:
    goldstone77 said:
    juanrga said:
    The hardware unboxed 30 game Battle is clearly wrong because overclocking the i7-7800X by 34% did only bring 3% higher framerates.

    The author now acknowledges there was some problem with his review



    However, the problem is not in the SKL-X chip because the KBL chips was also bottlenecked. He overclocked the kabylake chip by 16% and performance only increased by 2%. The problem is in another part. He tested in frame-limiting and GPU-bound situations and that is why overclocking the Intel chips didn't bring any sensible performance gain.


    Juan you forgot to mention that Hardware Unboxed also included this picture of his overclocked 7800X!



    https://twitter.com/HardwareUnboxed/status/888225519141093376

    Referenced from the pinned comment
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfNMn7RWgLw&feature=youtu.be


    I knew that image and I didn't mention it because I think it is irrelevant to my point about how in his review both Intel chips were seriously bottlenecked, and not showing real performance. There are, however, people that thinks differently

    Quote:
    If motherboard does that to CPU i am not trusting that CPU performing properly in the first place.


    Thanks for the twitter link. Hardware Unboxed finally admitted that didn't test a retail 7800X chip:

    Quote:
    It's an ES sample :D Well QS sample but still warranty isn't the issue here ;)


    QS is different from ES. A QS is a product ready for retail, but unreleased...ES is an early sample, not ready for retail.

    If you are inferring that the final retail product will not have such deficiencies as a QS, you are mistaken.
    Reply to 8350rocks
  47. 8350rocks said:
    juanrga said:
    goldstone77 said:
    juanrga said:
    The hardware unboxed 30 game Battle is clearly wrong because overclocking the i7-7800X by 34% did only bring 3% higher framerates.

    The author now acknowledges there was some problem with his review



    However, the problem is not in the SKL-X chip because the KBL chips was also bottlenecked. He overclocked the kabylake chip by 16% and performance only increased by 2%. The problem is in another part. He tested in frame-limiting and GPU-bound situations and that is why overclocking the Intel chips didn't bring any sensible performance gain.


    Juan you forgot to mention that Hardware Unboxed also included this picture of his overclocked 7800X!



    https://twitter.com/HardwareUnboxed/status/888225519141093376

    Referenced from the pinned comment
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfNMn7RWgLw&feature=youtu.be


    I knew that image and I didn't mention it because I think it is irrelevant to my point about how in his review both Intel chips were seriously bottlenecked, and not showing real performance. There are, however, people that thinks differently

    Quote:
    If motherboard does that to CPU i am not trusting that CPU performing properly in the first place.


    Thanks for the twitter link. Hardware Unboxed finally admitted that didn't test a retail 7800X chip:

    Quote:
    It's an ES sample :D Well QS sample but still warranty isn't the issue here ;)


    QS is different from ES. A QS is a product ready for retail, but unreleased...ES is an early sample, not ready for retail.

    If you are inferring that the final retail product will not have such deficiencies as a QS, you are mistaken.


    ES = Engineering Sample

    QS = Qualification Sample.

    QS are usually identical to retail chips, but not always. In any case, the only deficiency here was on the review itself.
    Reply to juanrga
  48. I wonder how well that 7920XE is going to overclock. If that super low base clock speed is any indicator, I doubt you'll get higher than 4.5ghz on all 18 cores before thermal throttling on even the highest of coolants.
    Reply to TechyInAZ
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