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Can a seasonic s12II 620 80+ bronze handle my components?

Can this psu handle these components? How can i compute if how many components could this psu handle?

My parts are as follows
Gigabyte ga h81m ds2 mobo
Asus gtx 1050 ti dual oc 4gb gpu
I5 processor 4400mhz
Dvdr
Backlit keyboard and mouse
Atleast 4 fans, no liquid cooling system (but planning to buy one in the future)
15 inch led monitor
Headphones
10 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about seasonic s12ii 620 bronze handle components
  1. Without a doubt. In fact, it is over-powered. But that is good... for future upgrades.
    What 15" LED monitor are you getting? Never saw one that small.
  2. They exist. They are portable monitor screens that are powered by USB 3.0 and are used with laptops and desktops usually as a secondary screen.
  3. Yeah, I did a quick Google search and found they do indeed exist. Learn something new everyday.
  4. clutchc said:
    But that is good... for future upgrades.

    Short of multi-GPU setups, you need some insane system config to break 400W these days and with GPUs/CPUs becoming more power-efficient every year, most future upgrades will likely use less power than the parts they are replacing, rendering the overkill PSUs of today even more overkill for tomorrow's systems.

    I wish PSU manufacturers drove higher quality and efficiency at the power levels people actually need instead of chasing pointlessly inflated numbers for marketing reasons.
  5. @ InvalidError
    That indeed seems to be the truth. I've noticed the same thing. Gfx cards alone have gotten extremely energy efficient, since Nvidia's Maxwell and later Pascal and now the AMD Polaris. But 650W is a good size to have.
  6. Wow! So many answers! I thank you all! But if i install a liquid cooling system, is it still efficient?
  7. Baekgaard said:
    Wow! So many answers! I thank you all! But if i install a liquid cooling system, is it still efficient?

    Liquid cooling makes hardly any difference in total system power, 15-20W for the pump, barely worth mentioning.

    Your PC will use around 200W, another 50W on top of that won't make any meaningful difference on a good quality 400+W PSU like Seasonic's S12 series.
  8. I asked this because when i inquired about a liquid cooling system, the supplier suggested to buy a psu with higher capacity, if what you say is true, and if i account all of your replies, i should go with 500 watt seasonic s12 series psu instead of the 620, it would save me around 20$.
  9. I'm powering my i7 3770K, and R9 280 which should have a power draw of around 300W off of a 450W PSU. I can't OC the system but for what I want it's fine. With so many people needing just a high quality but not high wattage PSU I agree that someone should start making quality ATX PSUs in the 300-450W range. Yet that just doesn't really seem to be happening.
  10. Best answer
    Baekgaard said:
    i should go with 500 watt seasonic s12 series psu instead of the 620, it would save me around 20$.

    Yes, you should. For most people, a higher quality 400-500W PSU is far more beneficial than a ridiculously over-powered one. My own system uses only about 250W under full load (according to my UPS) including a 24" LCD, three HDDs one SSD, DVD drive and a handful of USB peripherals.

    Anonymous said:
    I agree that someone should start making quality ATX PSUs in the 300-450W range. Yet that just doesn't really seem to be happening.

    The main reason why it isn't happening is simply that a high quality 300W PSU requires most of the same engineering effort as a similar quality 800W PSU except for components getting scaled down a bit and manufacturers prefer charging $50-100 more for the 800W models which only cost them $5 more to make.
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