Solved

Setting up dual monitor with one in GPU and one in Motherboard (Using ROG Crossblade Ranger)?

Any way to get this to work?
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about setting dual monitor gpu motherboard rog crossblade ranger
  1. Hello... YES, Typically you need to go into the BIO's and enable the Integrated AMD Radeon™ R/HD8000/HD7000 Series Graphics and exterior PCIe (both)... set some system memory for it, save and exit. Windows will see new hardware and want a driver for it.

    Right click the desktop-screen resolution and use this panel to set your primary and secondary monitor, settings and the details for how to use. You are basically adding more pixel real-estate to the OS desktop, when setting it up in "Extend" mode. You can manually move your secondary monitor icon to the left top right, or bottom of the primary location... I set mine to the middle left for my use... it's up to you and depends where you place your monitor on your desk, for a smooth mouse movement between the two.
  2. Where do I enable the Integrated Graphics within the BIOS?
  3. CombustibleLemons said:
    Any way to get this to work?


    Yes, but, really, don't. Run them both from your GPU.
  4. I can't, my second monitor doesn't support DVI
  5. Hello... I don't have your model... typically it will be in your MB manual and have seen it called 'integrated peripherals" in the past... it might be located where the modem and Sound chip switches are too.
  6. CombustibleLemons said:
    I can't, my second monitor doesn't support DVI


    What does the second monitor support and what ports does your GPU have? Also, which of those are you using for your first monitor.
  7. Not all mainboards support running both a video card output simultaneously with onboard video. It has to do with how the PCI BUS is integrated with the chipset. If it is supported, you should be able to find the settings in BIOS. various manufacturers have it in different places, but you're looking for something that mentions graphix or displays and enabling or setting an auto-detect function. Wish I could be more specific, but I didn't have all pieces of information

    However, it is usually recommended NOT to use both video card and mainboard. the video card and the onboard video would be different chipsets, and timing & sync of the displays would be slightly off. Some systems that offer this capability may only have a mirroring function.

    Your "second" monitor is most likely VGA, but possibly HDMI. Adapters for these are super cheap, and sometimes you can find thrift stores and IT businesses selling DVI to VGA and DVI to HDMI adapters for cheap. If your video card has 2x DVI ports, you'll probably notice that they are slightly different looking.

    -The Blade only connections are digital only. You can find a DVI to HDMI adapter quite easily. However, no audio will pass through the HDMI connection of the monitor. it would be video only.

    -The cross and pin connections tend to have the analog function built-in. This is so a user can purchase a DVI to VGA adapter to connect 1x legacy analog VGA monitor.

    Check your ports and see if you can get a cheap adapter and use the monitors in the configuration you're planning on using.
  8. Doramius said:
    Not all mainboards support running both a video card output simultaneously with onboard video. It has to do with how the PCI BUS is integrated with the chipset. If it is supported, you should be able to find the settings in BIOS. various manufacturers have it in different places, but you're looking for something that mentions graphix or displays and enabling or setting an auto-detect function. Wish I could be more specific, but I didn't have all pieces of information

    However, it is usually recommended NOT to use both video card and mainboard. the video card and the onboard video would be different chipsets, and timing & sync of the displays would be slightly off. Some systems that offer this capability may only have a mirroring function.

    Your "second" monitor is most likely VGA, but possibly HDMI. Adapters for these are super cheap, and sometimes you can find thrift stores and IT businesses selling DVI to VGA and DVI to HDMI adapters for cheap. If your video card has 2x DVI ports, you'll probably notice that they are slightly different looking.

    -The Blade only connections are digital only. You can find a DVI to HDMI adapter quite easily. However, no audio will pass through the HDMI connection of the monitor. it would be video only.

    -The cross and pin connections tend to have the analog function built-in. This is so a user can purchase a DVI to VGA adapter to connect 1x legacy analog VGA monitor.

    Check your ports and see if you can get a cheap adapter and use the monitors in the configuration you're planning on using.


    Yup. This is where i was getting aswell.
  9. Best answer
    Hello... basically the VGA pins are located where the Cross "+" is... on the DVI-I connector, if pins are present, there could be "analog" signals there for a VGA connection... and low cost passive adaptor use.
Ask a new question

Read More

GPUs Dual Monitors Motherboards