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***Vintage PC Technology Mega Discussion Thread*** - page 3

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  1. link pls
    Reply to Justiceinacan
  2. Today I've found a PCI 56k modem, and amazingly, it still works, I've put it in an old computer, booted up Windows 98 and then... the magic, that lovely dialing sound, opening IE 5.5 again after so many years to find that bing.com is the only search engine that still works (without updating the browser)

    And the best part is I'm currently downloading the missing audio driver on that thing, still 4 hours remaining, 2.4 kb/s I love it.
    Reply to Elysian890
  3. lol. i don't even have a landline anymore to work a modem. but that old sound of it connecting is music to my ears. used to have it as a ringtone on my phone but long since lost the file.
    Reply to Math Geek
  4. Elysian890 said:
    Today I've found a PCI 56k modem, and amazingly, it still works, I've put it in an old computer, booted up Windows 98 and then... the magic, that lovely dialing sound, opening IE 5.5 again after so many years to find that bing.com is the only search engine that still works (without updating the browser)

    And the best part is I'm currently downloading the missing audio driver on that thing, still 4 hours remaining, 2.4 kb/s I love it.


    I have a low profile one sitting around that works(in theory, we NEVER used it).
    Reply to XxD34THxX
  5. i'm pretty much out of all my old parts like that. i have a couple i keep on hand for testing but i've sold or given away all the older stuff i did have. i had a ton of agp video cards for a while and a large box of ddr1/2 ram and other assorted things like modems and network cards. but over time i slowly installed them into clients old pc's and never had a reason to rebuild the supply. now the used stuff i get is newer and includes a lot of ddr3 ram and newer cpu's

    i still fix up and give away a good 10 systems a week to needy in the community. this time of year we get a lot of stuff donated since a lot of upgrading happens with the holidays. i'll be working for 2 months after the holidays to check out and restore all that's been donated. life is good :D
    Reply to Math Geek
  6. I have given away thousands of dollars worth of old PC equipment back in the day (or tossed it in the trash), because old stuff usually ended up so slow in comparison (or useless) that it wasn't even worth the effort to ebay at the time. Nobody gave a crap about "retro computing" either.
    Reply to Rogue Leader
  7. 100% true

    my pieces went one by one into old pc's for clients that had a part die. so as mobo ethernet went out, my networking cards went. as gpu's dies or the onboard video was just too slow to do anything anymore. my slightly better agp gpu's went one by one and so on.

    the ones i'm giving away now are usually about 5 yrs old. enough for a homework/internet system which is what they are intended for. poor students who need something to do homework on. see a lot of first gen i5 systems and even some older fx systems popping up. plenty good enough for web use and homework. of course i do still get a lot of core 2 duo stuff but even they can handle the light loads overall.
    Reply to Math Geek
  8. In class, we have a giant drawer full of Floppies, another of DDR1/2, and other stuff... Lotta IDE cables as well.
    Reply to XxD34THxX
  9. XxD34THxX said:
    Elysian890 said:
    Today I've found a PCI 56k modem, and amazingly, it still works, I've put it in an old computer, booted up Windows 98 and then... the magic, that lovely dialing sound, opening IE 5.5 again after so many years to find that bing.com is the only search engine that still works (without updating the browser)

    And the best part is I'm currently downloading the missing audio driver on that thing, still 4 hours remaining, 2.4 kb/s I love it.


    I have a low profile one sitting around that works(in theory, we NEVER used it).


    USR 0766, still works like a charm, I remember having an older one, ISA socket, I remember it because of its huge speaker and 2 audio jacks, from the 80's I think

    Math Geek said:
    lol. i don't even have a landline anymore to work a modem. but that old sound of it connecting is music to my ears. used to have it as a ringtone on my phone but long since lost the file.


    I have a landline phone only because my apartment came with it lol and that's great, I don't really rely on mobiles, I know, weird, I really feel like I was born too late, I'm only 22 years old but I had my first computer at the age of 14 and it didn't came with a modem, so... it's a nice experience, I'm still playing with it
    Reply to Elysian890
  10. Waitaminnit, some of you have been talking about modems, some specifically 56k and say that they still work. How? Even if you have a landline, does the phone company provide dial-up internet service to all subscribers?

    I live in a remote corner of the world and the internet came here less than 20 years ago. It was 56k for a few years until it was superseded by ADSL which is still the main means of internet access. A few small companies offer direct satellite internet and mobile phone companies provide internet service via USB dongles. No cable yet, and 56k has not existed for more than 10 years.
    Reply to Pimpom
  11. First computer I used was a CP/M-86 based device to convert data punch cards to magnetic reels

    First computer I build myself was an Apple2+ clone kit... forget the name but it was a nice system, cheap to make and ran like a champ

    First Home computer, 1983 TRS-80 Model 3 with 64Kb Ram, and 2 5.25" 187Kb drives. and to astonish a few, 110 baud coupling modem. (that's would be 110 characters per second...), after a few "upgrades" namely a 10 Megabyte External Hard drive and 4 720K disk drives (yes take out large drives out , wire in 4 small drives in holes... was awesome! not to mention the massive 128Kb ram upgrade lol I ran a Bulletin Board System during 1987-1990 off that thing, had many networked forums on there an of course as soon as 56K modem where available I had one running on it.

    in 1997 before I left for the USA, I gently placed 3 TRS80 Model 3, boxes of manuals, Diskettes, and 1 16" line printer on the corner of the garage... students living in a duplex across the street "magically appeared as I was bringing out the last box out of the garage... eyeing the stuff... politely asked if they could have it... and a nod and 3 stupid smiles later the treasure was hauled away across the street....

    thank you for the memories
    Reply to The Paladin
  12. Pimpom said:
    Waitaminnit, some of you have been talking about modems, some specifically 56k and say that they still work. How? Even if you have a landline, does the phone company provide dial-up internet service to all subscribers?

    I live in a remote corner of the world and the internet came here less than 20 years ago. It was 56k for a few years until it was superseded by ADSL which is still the main means of internet access. A few small companies offer direct satellite internet and mobile phone companies provide internet service via USB dongles. No cable yet, and 56k has not existed for more than 10 years.


    If you have ADSL or VDSL (mostly known as uverse, this is actually a brand) then you have 56k because it uses the same line, all you need is hardware that can recognize the signal and use it (modem) plus an username and password combination, in my case it's my name@provider and SSN
    Reply to Elysian890
  13. haha.... this thread brings back memories!!
    First computer: Commodore 64 (c.1984).... and that was 64k memory.... NOT 64bit :) Some people had the 5.25" floppy disks (180k), but I had to make do with the audio cassettes (5-10minutes to load a game!)...
    First family PC: an 8086 "XT clone" (c.1989) clocked at a whopping 5Mhz, instead of the usuall 4.77Mhz.... and it had a turbo button that took it up to 12Mhz, but some games were unplayable at 12Mhz as the character's movements were based on the CPU clock speed. This was upgraded from the usual 512kb RAM to 640kb with 16 little 16kb chips that plugged directly into the motherboard.
    Firsty personal PC's: Dell 325 (386DX 25Mhz)(c.1992), Pentiums were out, but most had 1Mb-4Mb RAM, so this was faster for most stuff as it was upgraded to the gills: maths co-processor and a total of 40Mb RAM! (16Mb on the motherboard: 4x4Mb SIMMS) and another 2x Intel "Above Boards" (8Mb+16Mb), so it had the full quota of extended memory (16Mb), expanded memory (16Mb) and at least a an 8Mb RAM drive...
    First modem (family): (c.1990) BAUD2400 "double speed" (most online experiences were 1200bps), but there wasn't anything out there really - just a few BBS boards and my dad's computer network.
    First personal modem: US Robotics "Sportster" 14.4.... followed by the US Robotics 56k!

    The say that I've been obsessed with the tinkering with computers is an understatement... here's a magazine article from PCZone in 1998.... back when magazines were on paper :p
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v148/LostBok/computers-misc/th_PCZone1_zpsgeu5czfu.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v148/LostBok/computers-misc/th_PCZone2_zps4t8mrcc8.jpg
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v148/LostBok/computers-misc/th_PCZone3_zpsxijs78re.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v148/LostBok/computers-misc/th_PCZone4_zpsuvyu4qfz.jpg
    My computers then was actually DUAL P2 333Mhz, overclocked to 392Mhz.... until I replaced the Orchid Righteous 3D (4Mb) + Tseng ET6000 (2.25Mb) with a combined 2D+3D card (nVidia TNT 128Mb).... but the AGP bus was locked to the overclocked FSB and I had to clock the whole box down to 350Mhz :(
    That system went up to 512Mb shortly after the article.... running either NT5 beta or NT4 + some hacked DirectX drivers that allowed any game to run... my LAN party box (mini tower+duct tape handle) had the old Tseng card and two Voodoo2 12Mb's (SLI'd) and a Pentium166Mhz overclocked to 250Mhz (with the aid of 128Mb PC100 RAM and LOTS of cooling)....
    Reply to bahnstormer
  14. I remember our VIC20. I think it's still in a closet somewhere. Used to play all sorts of games on it. We'd press Play on the tape deck and come back 30 minutes later to play the hell out of a Pac-Man like game. Also plugged in cartridges to play Lunar Lander and Gorf. The game cartridges were even compatible with the Commodore 64/128 we got years later as an upgrade system.
    Reply to Doramius
  15. I wonder if a dialup modem would work with my Comcast VoIP? I get the dial tone... I can fax over it... I wonder how much of a kick in their crotch it would be to run a dial up over their VoIP?
    Reason being; they couldn't count it as part of their 1Tb/month data cap. My household regularly hits 900+Gb/month. One of these days, we're going to hit that ceiling.
    Meanwhile, I wonder what it would do to my overall data speed to bridge the two? Now that would be an interesting experiment.
    Reply to jdlech
  16. jdlech said:
    I wonder if a dialup modem would work with my Comcast VoIP? I get the dial tone... I can fax over it... I wonder how much of a kick in their crotch it would be to run a dial up over their VoIP?
    Reason being; they couldn't count it as part of their 1Tb/month data cap. My household regularly hits 900+Gb/month. One of these days, we're going to hit that ceiling.
    Meanwhile, I wonder what it would do to my overall data speed to bridge the two? Now that would be an interesting experiment.


    If you were to max out the bandwidth on a dialup connection, running it 24/7, it would not materially affect your 1TB monthly data cap.
    Reply to USAFRet
  17. 56k modem used to net me abut 7 Kb/s up n down together. so that's, let's see, .....7 x 60 x 60 x 24 x 30 = 18,144,000 Kb/month or 18.14 Gb/month or about 1.8% of your monthly 1TB limit. :D

    name says it all......
    Reply to Math Geek
  18. Math Geek said:
    56k modem used to net me abut 7 Kb/s up n down together. so that's, let's see, .....7 x 60 x 60 x 24 x 30 = 18,144,000 Kb/month or 18.14 Gb/month or about 1.8% of your monthly 1TB limit. :D

    name says it all......


    Neeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerd
    Reply to XxD34THxX
  19. got the old cruise control set at 35 and when i get there.....

    Reply to Math Geek
  20. My first PC was an Ohio Scientific Challenger 2P. It was built from a kit. It had a MOS 6502 Processor @ 1.2 MHz, 25 KB of RAM, a single 5 1/4" Single Sided Double Density Floppy Drive and an 80x25 Amdek black and white monitor.

    It was a great machine. It came with BASIC interpreter and an Assembler Editor. There was a rudimentary DOS written in BASIC and you wrote files to entire Tracks on the Floppy. About 4500 lines of BASIC was all the RAM could hold.

    But I was still able to write duplicates for several of the games at the Arcade like Space Invaders and Asteroids.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio_Scientific#/media/File:Challenger_2P-IMG_4137.jpg
    Reply to casualsailor
  21. i miss those days where some BASIC code could write you a game in an afternoon. i could program BASIC but did not focus on games. a lot of stuff you'd use a spreadsheet for now i wrote programs for. was not to hard to do so long as i could map it out first on paper and get the formulas and dependencies figured out.
    Reply to Math Geek
  22. bahnstormer said:
    haha.... this thread brings back memories!!
    First computer: Commodore 64 (c.1984).... and that was 64k memory.... NOT 64bit :) Some people had the 5.25" floppy disks (180k), but I had to make do with the audio cassettes (5-10minutes to load a game!)...
    First family PC: an 8086 "XT clone" (c.1989) clocked at a whopping 5Mhz, instead of the usuall 4.77Mhz.... and it had a turbo button that took it up to 12Mhz, but some games were unplayable at 12Mhz as the character's movements were based on the CPU clock speed. This was upgraded from the usual 512kb RAM to 640kb with 16 little 16kb chips that plugged directly into the motherboard.
    Firsty personal PC's: Dell 325 (386DX 25Mhz)(c.1992), Pentiums were out, but most had 1Mb-4Mb RAM, so this was faster for most stuff as it was upgraded to the gills: maths co-processor and a total of 40Mb RAM! (16Mb on the motherboard: 4x4Mb SIMMS) and another 2x Intel "Above Boards" (8Mb+16Mb), so it had the full quota of extended memory (16Mb), expanded memory (16Mb) and at least a an 8Mb RAM drive...
    First modem (family): (c.1990) BAUD2400 "double speed" (most online experiences were 1200bps), but there wasn't anything out there really - just a few BBS boards and my dad's computer network.
    First personal modem: US Robotics "Sportster" 14.4.... followed by the US Robotics 56k!


    I think the first modem I had was some cheap generic Mac modem that plugged into the keyboard and I think it was a 14.4 modem but I can't remember all the specs. I got my first 56K modem back in the late 1990s and I think it was a US Robotics. Either that or it was a Creative.
    Reply to g-unit1111
  23. creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.
    Reply to Math Geek
  24. I definitely do not miss the days where you had to select your graphics adapter and sound card for each invidiual game.
    Reply to DSzymborski
  25. Math Geek said:
    creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.


    I always found the off-brand ones to suck big time. Pretty much stuck with U.S. Robotics. Do they even still exist ???
    Reply to Yogi2367
  26. used to love my notebook with all the COM/IRQ ports listed so i could keep track of what was on what port. hated chasing port conflicts to get something working. old serial port printers were the worst for conflicts no matter what it was set to
    Reply to Math Geek
  27. Yogi2367 said:
    Math Geek said:
    creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.


    I always found the off-brand ones to suck big time. Pretty much stuck with U.S. Robotics. Do they even still exist ???


    not sure if they do or not. think i bought a couple network cards of theirs back in the day but that was not recently at all. and yah my off brand modems were not the best. when you only got about 7 Kb/s total up/down, then losing even 1 Kb/s of that was a deal breaker.
    Reply to Math Geek
  28. Yogi2367 said:
    Math Geek said:
    creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.


    I always found the off-brand ones to suck big time. Pretty much stuck with U.S. Robotics. Do they even still exist ???


    I always used US Robotics as well. They eventually bought Palm, and then all were acquired by 3Com. But 3Com spun them off and IIRC they still make Modems of some sort today, but as a really small company.

    http://www.usr.com/home/
    Reply to Rogue Leader
  29. Math Geek said:
    creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.


    So glad that we don't need expansion cards for everything anymore. You could buy a sound card now and they're so much better than what they were 20 years ago, but the fact that it's not a necessity anymore is definitely a good thing.
    Reply to g-unit1111
  30. g-unit1111 said:
    Math Geek said:
    creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.


    So glad that we don't need expansion cards for everything anymore. You could buy a sound card now and they're so much better than what they were 20 years ago, but the fact that it's not a necessity anymore is definitely a good thing.


    It's like car stereos.
    Used to be, the factory thing sucked badly. So you went out and bought a new Alpine or similar, along with some 6x9's.

    Now, the factory job is pretty good, and due to the configuration of the dash, and the intertwining of the audio into the whole car electronics, you can't really just slide a new one in.
    Aftermarket stereo is for the serious car modder.
    Reply to USAFRet
  31. USAFRet said:
    It's like car stereos.
    Used to be, the factory thing sucked badly. So you went out and bought a new Alpine or similar, along with some 6x9's.

    Now, the factory job is pretty good, and due to the configuration of the dash, and the intertwining of the audio into the whole car electronics, you can't really just slide a new one in.
    Aftermarket stereo is for the serious car modder.


    Yeah my old Pontiac that I used to have I had so many aftermarket things on it - the car alarm (and it was the cheapest car alarm ever), the CD player, the cruise control, and so on. Now on my Nissan everything is integrated.
    Reply to g-unit1111
  32. my last few new cars had some pretty awesome factory radios it never even crossed my mind to replace it. when i was younger of course that was the first thing you did.

    recall my first car, a 1982 Chevette, (stop laughing), had a single speaker in the dash for the fm radio in had. stopped on the way home with the car for the new radio plus speakers and amp and had it installed before i even took the car out to show everyone what i bought.

    now you can get 1500w systems with 1000w subs in the trunk from the factory. they finally learned what people wanted and started including it.
    Reply to Math Geek
  33. g-unit1111 said:
    Math Geek said:
    creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.


    So glad that we don't need expansion cards for everything anymore. You could buy a sound card now and they're so much better than what they were 20 years ago, but the fact that it's not a necessity anymore is definitely a good thing.


    One of my systems at one point had 3 graphics cards, 1 Sound card, and an ethernet card. The 3 graphics cards were an ATI 3D Rage II for the main graphics, a Power VR PCX2 gaming GPU, and a Creative Dxr2 DVD decoder card (only way to get DVD audio and Dolby Digital because the sound cards didn't support it yet). The PowerVR worked through the PCI bus, but the Creative card required a pass through VGA cable.


    Math Geek said:
    my last few new cars had some pretty awesome factory radios it never even crossed my mind to replace it. when i was younger of course that was the first thing you did.

    recall my first car, a 1982 Chevette, (stop laughing), had a single speaker in the dash for the fm radio in had. stopped on the way home with the car for the new radio plus speakers and amp and had it installed before i even took the car out to show everyone what i bought.

    now you can get 1500w systems with 1000w subs in the trunk from the factory. they finally learned what people wanted and started including it.


    They learned people who want crazy systems will always do it, but the folks who want something better but not insane, and without the hassle are willing to pay more for it. So the guy who drops $899 on the upgraded factory system option normally would have bought a $200 radio and been done with it. Combined with fancier dashes and more integration into car systems (making things cheaper for them as well, 1 screen to control all of it = less buttons), and there you go.

    Every car I had up until I bought my 2000 Vette in 2006 had a fairly crazy aftermarket stereo setup in it (I also worked at a Stereo shop for years), These days I'm happy with the Boston Acoustics factory system in my Camaro (although I do have the itch to upgrade it because with the windows down its a bit weak, and I think I damaged the passenger door speaker), and the Harmon Kardon Logic 7 system in my Benz is phenomenal. My Silverado is the only one with a weak stock system but its still more than good enough and considering the truck sits around most of the time, spending money on a radio and speakers for it is just dumb.
    Reply to Rogue Leader
  34. Quote:
    Pretty much stuck with U.S. Robotics. Do they even still exist ???

    yes they makde still a lot of products including 56k modems and others http://www.usr.com/products/
    Reply to The Paladin
  35. I would probably get a base stereo, so I could get what I want. I do not know of any of the Super Duty stereos that come with USB port.
    Reply to logainofhades
  36. 2008 focus SE has a USB port and Sync system has bluetooth and all that built in. :P

    my sister's Dodge minivan even has a built in hdd for music built in. usually they combine the good stereo set-up with sunroof in a package, making it a pretty good deal. can't imagine what it would be like trying to replace a stereo that was integrated into the car like some of these new systems are. is there even such a thing as a "base" stereo anymore.

    my new Fusion has like 13 speakers all over the place and will rattle the windows at half volume. i don't really need much more than that as it'll make your heart skip a beat or two when it really gets going :D
    Reply to Math Geek
  37. My fiat has that usb thing, problem you have to convert the 320kps nice audio files to max 192kps for it to play.... sucks considering I have 7 speakers Bose Sound system in the car. but eh. such is life.
    Reply to The Paladin
  38. mine has to scan the drive plugged in everytime the card starts to get the catalog for the speak to play feature. i don't use it because of that. takes like 10 minutes everytime you go somewhere just for it to read the files on it. so i just do the bluetooth connection and control it that way.

    might be better now but the older sync system was like this. not even tried it with newer system as i'm just used to the bluetooth way now.


    so much nicer either way than the old pack of disks in the car that got scratched all to hell. or even back in the day with cassettes/8-tracks where you'd always get one or 2 that would unspool and get all knotted up in the glovebox/center console
    Reply to Math Geek
  39. ah
    Quote:
    8-tracks

    I remember breaking one in the car one day caught on a comb in the glove box, had to use the silver from a cigarette pack packaging and rub it across the two broken parts to mend it to listen to it... yes I was that dedicated to the beegees in my 1978 Vega with aluminium block.. :)
    Reply to The Paladin
  40. nothing more vintage than an 8 track player :)

    friend had an old VW rabbit from like 78 or 79. it had an 8 track so he had the cassette convertor that plugged into it. car broke down on us one day and we left it overnight. when we came back someone had stolen the 8 track player and the cassette adapter!! this was in like 1990 or so. other than to be a d***, no idea why they would steal such a thing
    Reply to Math Geek
  41. I transferred my radio shack 8 track player from car to car until mid 90's :) the quality of the 8 track sound was better than the 4 tracks casettes IMHO, beside too broke to buy again all my music I already had. it went to the scrap yard with my amc gremlin (wink talk about back to the past car)
    Reply to The Paladin
  42. 4 door Ford Grenada, pale metallic blue ... put in my own Pioneer 8-track deck ... LOL
    And The Paladin is right ... 8-tracks were way better than cassettes :)
    Reply to Yogi2367
  43. Getting a bit off topic here, lets steer back to PCs.....

    Like how we used to back up to tapes (and in reality many places STILL do!)
    Reply to Rogue Leader
  44. hard to keep a bunch of old guys on topic :)

    we just love to talk about the old days.

    never had one of those tape back-ups, never had enough data to need to back up. but my dad worked for HQ corporate (old home improvement store now gone) and i remember seeing the huge real to reals they had to back up their databases
    Reply to Math Geek
  45. I think he means, when the first PC came out like the TRS-80 Model 1, you did a program, but to use the program again you have a casette tape machine and had to record the program on it before shutting down the pc, otherwise you have nothing left.... thankfully only had to suffer that for 2 years then got myself a nice 5.25" floppy drive add on
    Reply to The Paladin
  46. i remember those but never owned one myself. was before my pc days. by the time i got my first pc we had the 5.25" floppy disks to save to.
    Reply to Math Geek
  47. Rogue Leader said:
    g-unit1111 said:
    Math Geek said:
    creative was huge back then with modems and sound cards. think most of my 56k were creative though i did have a few off brand ones i got over time.


    So glad that we don't need expansion cards for everything anymore. You could buy a sound card now and they're so much better than what they were 20 years ago, but the fact that it's not a necessity anymore is definitely a good thing.


    One of my first Gateways that I had I had literally every expansion slot and drive bay filled. I had a sound card, a 56K modem, a SCSI expansion card, a graphics card, and a Voodoo 2. And I had like 4 hard drives, a CD burner and a DVD player. And when I added my first CD burner the whole thing just went completely unusable. I can't remember what company it was from but I think it no longer exists.
    Reply to g-unit1111
  48. had a friend who had one of the first WORM drives and he had nothing but trouble with it as well. if it worked a buffer underun error was likely half the time. those disks were expensive back then for a 50/50 shot at working. i went straight to the Zip drives for larger storage. the 250 mb ones were pretty good and i could carry it with me to college where we had fast enough access to actually be able to download something in a timely manner.

    this was back when we could download audio cd's but still at full CDA size. so 700 mb for a full cd. no mp3 back then. good ol BBS access was the best you got for sharing stuff like that.
    Reply to Math Geek
  49. Does anyone remember the concept of using your VCR as a tape backup.
    I never did it, but it was out there.
    Reply to USAFRet
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