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***Vintage PC Technology Mega Discussion Thread*** - page 2

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  1. Math Geek said:
    i had a 9600 all-in-wonder and agree it's the best card i ever bought. am putting together a parts list for a small htpc to replace cable completely and wish there was such an option now. gonna take multiple parts to get all the options this one card had.


    I had one too. It was awesome.
    Reply to USAFRet
  2. Lol computer shopper man that was the best and it was huge. Ive worked on 8088,8086 80186 80286 then turbos then 386 sx and dx so on so forth. jeesus ive spent a fortune on hardware.
    Reply to galeener
  3. I owned an original IBM PC I think it was about 1982 It had 64K memory and two 64K floppy disk. I still have Floppy disk for DOS 1.1 and floppy disk for the original spreadsheet program VisaCalc ver 1.0. These were the days before 1.44 floppy disk and Hard disk. If i'm not mistake it was a 186. I also have the original 5250 Display Station Emulation Adapter Programs Users guide and the Installation and Problem Determination Procedures Manuel.
    Reply to MabF
  4. g-unit1111 said:
    Hello and welcome to the nostalgia tech mega thread!

    Have you ever been the owner of a 486? Or a Macintosh running System 7? Or know what the various cages that hold CD-ROM discs are for? Have you ever used a 1.44MB floppy drive? Or a punchcard? Or a 3DFX Voodoo 2? Well this is the place to discuss all things vintage PC technology! Reminder - keep things civil and avoid the GRAPES. As usual, all Tom's Hardware rules apply. This thread will be moderated.

    Bought an off-brand 486 in 1996 for my home use; had Windows 95 and dial-up.
    .
    Reply to Ed Chombeau
  5. I still fire up this old girl every now and then. https://pcpartpicker.com/b/yrpgXL
    Reply to edman545
  6. I still have a pile of 3.5" floppies laying around. An external zip drive in the desk drawer. Used to use 1.44 floppies in grade school with their mac's. I'm not sure if I still have my first pc, a tandy coco3. Think I gave it to a cousin during one of the times my family moved when I was younger. Pretty sure I have a couple 5.25" hdd's roaming around somewhere.

    My parents had a tatung pc clone in the late 80's running dos and I loved it. I could write reports for school and print them off while enjoying the serenade of the dot matrix printer. It sure beat typing on a typewriter and having to fix typo's. There was no sneaking onto the pc to finish up homework on that thing, once you turned it on and the 80mm fans started whizzing, the dot matrix realigned itself it was like something from "lost in space" whirring to life lol.

    I'm definitely grateful for optical mice these days. Especially with the higher resolutions, I remember having to scroll the old mouse on my compaq several times across the pad. That and digging the ball out, wiping it off, using the eraser on a #2 pencil to clean the gunk and lint off the rollers inside when the ball stopped spinning free.

    It's been awhile, I should dig through storage one of these days and sort out some of the older systems I have kicking around. Most of them older business systems the owners didn't want anymore and were just going to throw away. A couple of them the case alone was intriguing, one a full tower (much taller than my enthoo pro) and another an older yeon yang b0221 cube server case.

    What's funny about the yeon yang, it's got to be a 13-14yo case by now at least and yet it looks a lot like a mirror of the corsair air 540. Obviously the air 540 is much more modern, nice side panel window etc but the layout is pretty much the same. Motherboard/gpu on one side, the psu and drives on the other side of the split case.

    Reply to synphul
  7. I have a copy of win 95 and plus on floppy somewhere. I think it was 99 floppy's for win 95.
    first computer I had was a old TI with a cassette player for a hard drive
    Reply to rathar3
  8. Reply to g-unit1111
  9. g-unit1111 said:


    That new NES is definitely something I will purchase. For $60 it's really a great thing.
    Reply to turkey3_scratch
  10. especially once folks figure out how to flash more games to it. won't take long i'm sure. all the roms are already out there. someone will take the time to add more games to the box
    Reply to Math Geek
  11. First PC I built had a Pentium III or IV and a GeForce 2... good times.
    Reply to Justiceinacan
  12. i still see P4 systems come to me regularly for maintenance. amazing how many of these are still in use with some updated to win 7.

    sounds crazy but some folks don't need anything more for email and occasional web browsing if that's all they do.
    Reply to Math Geek
  13. turkey3_scratch said:
    That new NES is definitely something I will purchase. For $60 it's really a great thing.


    Yup! I'm buying one of those ASAP. I hope they do a Super Nintendo and N64 version.
    Reply to g-unit1111
  14. Not only do I have all my old PCs, starting with the TRS-80 and including odd stuff like this weird PC-compatible Commodore, I also have most of my old files, including save games.

    Which leads to some weird situations like me finally finishing King's Quest III in 2012 on a file that I started in 1989. I had lost that stupid page with all the spells written on them and finding them didn't become easy until the internet age.
    Reply to DSzymborski
  15. DSzymborski said:
    Which leads to some weird situations like me finally finishing King's Quest III in 2012 on a file that I started in 1989. I had lost that stupid page with all the spells written on them and finding them didn't become easy until the internet age.


    Wow, that is a long time to go between starting a game and finishing it! :lol:

    I have a buddy of mine who is a video game collector and he has literally every system going back to the Atari 2600 through the current PS4 and XBox. He even has his parents' old rear projection TV. When it works its' great! :lol:
    Reply to g-unit1111
  16. Rogue Leader said:
    My first "computer job" we had a ZIP drive with the 100mb disks we had a lot of our group licensed software for our clients on it, so I would schlep that thing to their offices to install stuff. Or I would bring blank disks to back up data on a machine I was re-installing Windows on. It was faster than burning a CD, but running it through the computers parallel port was still slow as heck. I carried a PalmPilot back then for work notes and stuff it was funny, people looked at me and how that thing worked and you would think they saw a space alien.

    I copied anything useful off all my old 1.44mb floppies onto 1 CD years ago probably a bit before the time I moved out of my parents house (2006?) and tossed them all.


    My first computer-related job was to install a server and token ring-based network for the DoD Army ... 10based2. It was horrible ... slow ... painful ... but it worked. Mid 80's. From memory it was called a token ring.
    Reply to Reynod
  17. Sounds about right Reynod, token rings were more or less the predecessor to ethernet and came out in the mid 80's. From what I understand more complex and likely more expensive than ethernet but the type of networking we have today wasn't around then. A whopping 10mbps for 10base2 :P
    Reply to synphul
  18. Rogue Leader said:
    Quote:
    He said "The 25MHz 286 was more computer than most people will ever need"


    The first PC my family ever owned was a 386 SX 25 with a 340mb hard drive, at a time that 100mb was normal. I can't tell you how many times I heard "340 megabytes?!?!?! You will NEVER fill that up! It will last FOREVER!"


    I had a 386sx 25 and a 42 mb Seagate hard drive with first 2 mb and then 8 mb ram. As you well know 8 mb was the limit. 1992-1998
    I ran Dos 6.20 and Win 3.11 WG. I started with Dos 5. I still have all this and plan to run Dos 6.2 and Win 3.11 WG Again. I'm going to move all my floppy stuff to CD and run a multiboot retro including Win98SE. The reason for doing this is I have a program called Command Post and Wilson Window-ware. This allowed me to use a custom text window interface that was like Windows but used menu items instead of icons. Gonna take another shot at Linux!? ""It will last FOREVER" and "You'll never need that much". Well, it still works.
    Reply to robbcravens13
  19. Dug up an old PC in the design communications lab at a school I went to. 0.3 GHz processor. Didn't recognize any names, but it boots. Boot drive was scrapped.
    Reply to Justiceinacan
  20. After nearly 6 dozen posts, I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Amigas. But more about that later.

    My first introduction to computers was an IBM 1620. It had a whopping 40 kilobytes of memory, used punched cards and occupied a whole floor. I was 17, attending special classes for selected college students back in the summer of 1969. It was shortly before Armstrong & Co. left for the moon and we plotted their course, taking more than 2 days and using up stacks of punched cards.

    My first personal computer was an Amiga A500 of 1985 vintage but bought second-hand a few years later. Powered by a 7MHz Motorola 68000 CPU and 0.5MB RAM, it came integrated with 4-channel audio, 16-bit processing and a 12-bit palette display with full GUI.

    I inherited an 8088 and a 286 from some folks but they didn't really interest me much.

    Then came the Amiga A1200, released 1992 but again bought somewhat later. 14MHz 68020 CPU, later accelerated with a 68040 running at 28MHz. 24-bit color OS that could run from a single 880KB floppy disk on 2MB built-in RAM, including graphics memory and no virtual memory. Multiple windows open with different resolutions at the same time!

    I added 4MBs of EDO RAM later for a total of 6MB and also bought a huge 630MB Seagate HDD for the then equivalent of US$250. My OS partition was 10MB and the OS "Workbench 3" took up all of 4.4MB when fully installed.

    When it became painfully clear that there was no hope of revival for the Amiga after the company went bankrupt due to incompetent management, I was forced to switch to a Windows PC around 2000.
    Reply to Pimpom
  21. Well, it's kind of like how there's little mention of Atari's home PCs. The local library branch, back when I was a kid in the early/mid 80s, had an Atari 400 that you could use. Most people used it for the couple of games that they had, as opposed to doing anything else with it...
    Reply to spdragoo
  22. that long ago there was little else to do with them in school. we still wrote everything on actual physical paper by hand. still took typing on a typewriter in high school and had never imagined a computer lab full of these wonder machines to work on as a class.

    we had apple 2e's in elementary school in every classroom but not like there was a projector for power point presentations or smart boards or any of the cool tech we have in classrooms today. was no internet so not like there was online gradebooks and attendance and such like they have now.

    so really what else was there to do with a pc in the classroom? other than some "educational" games. was there even an office suite for things like these first gen pc's from apple, atari, commador and so on?? i know lotus 123 was the first one i ever used but that was well into high school for me and long past the apple 2e days. we were on 286 systems by then if i recall right
    Reply to Math Geek
  23. I'd worked on IBM clone PCs from the early 1990s, troubleshooting and occasionally assembling them for others, but never really wanted one for myself until the end of the decade when it no longer made sense to keep hanging on to the orphaned Amiga as my main computer.

    I put my own first Windows machine together around 2000, entirely from scraps accumulated by working on other people's computers. It didn't have a cabinet and the motherboard stood on its edge on my table, leaning against the wall. It was a Pentium 200 overclocked to 266MHz, the highest the mobo's jumpers could manage. The PSU was a 150W unit I'd repaired. The 2GB HDD was a merger of two identical units - one with fried electronics and the other with a platter full of bad sectors. The CD-ROM drive was similarly born out of three discarded drives.

    The graphics card was a discarded SiS 6215 with 0.5MB RAM soldered onto the board plus an empty RAM socket. I got an extra 0.5MB chip by desoldering it from another card and inserted that into the empty socket, thus getting a whole 1MB gfx memory.

    The PSU lay on my table near the motherboard. The CD-ROM drive sat on the PSU and the HDD was on top of the optical drive. When I put a CD into the drive, it vibrated so much that it sometimes caused the computer to crash. A piece of foam between the two drives cured that problem. Then came a Pentium II, an early slot type Pentium III and a K-5.

    My first all-new PC was an Athlon XP 1800+ with 128MB SDRAM, a 40GB HDD and a TNT2 graphics card.
    Reply to Pimpom
  24. Math Geek said:
    that long ago there was little else to do with them in school. we still wrote everything on actual physical paper by hand. still took typing on a typewriter in high school and had never imagined a computer lab full of these wonder machines to work on as a class.

    we had apple 2e's in elementary school in every classroom but not like there was a projector for power point presentations or smart boards or any of the cool tech we have in classrooms today. was no internet so not like there was online gradebooks and attendance and such like they have now.

    so really what else was there to do with a pc in the classroom? other than some "educational" games. was there even an office suite for things like these first gen pc's from apple, atari, commador and so on?? i know lotus 123 was the first one i ever used but that was well into high school for me and long past the apple 2e days. we were on 286 systems by then if i recall right


    Well, of course we needed those Apple II+/IIe machines! How else could we vicariously experience the joys of dying from dysentery on the Oregon Trail? LOL
    Reply to spdragoo
  25. In elementary school we had Apple IIe machines and a few IIgs machines, "computer class"consisted mostly of playing oregon trail, carmen sandiego, and 1 or 2 learning games. Similar IIgs machines in jr high.

    In high school Programming 1 and 2 (BASIC) was also done on Apple IIe computers (and this was in like 1995!), and we all had our own 5.25 floppies to save our projects and we had to turn in at the end of class they weren't allowed to leave the room. But there were 3 PCs in the room as well, an 8086, a 286 and a 386 all with black and white monitors. I put Doom on the 386 and would play that during class because I would finish the projects in about 5 minutes. Then a guy a couple years older than me in class who wasn't too bright asked me for help, I helped him out a bit and then he started asking me to just do it for him. Sure with enough payment. Then he decided he didn't want to pay me anymore and said if I didn't do it he would beat me up. Ok.... don't mess with the smart kid. I made my disk "disappear" for a day and reported it to the teacher. The next project I gave the guy who threatened me had my name commented in the code, which I had done on my own program as well. I knew he was too dumb to catch this because he turned around and handed it in like that. Next day teacher takes me outside and tells me of this "egregious violation". "Oh my gosh I can't believe someone did that! I'm shocked" He got kicked out of class. Never beat me up either. Don't mess with the smart kid.

    By senior year for AP Computer Science they had built a new computer lab with current PCs that even had internet access, and we coded in Pascal or C++ I think, I don't remember.
    Reply to Rogue Leader
  26. Rogue Leader said:
    In elementary school we had Apple IIe machines and a few IIgs machines, "computer class"consisted mostly of playing oregon trail, carmen sandiego, and 1 or 2 learning games. Similar IIgs machines in jr high.


    Yup, I remember very fondly the green screen Apple IIes, and when my school got the first colored Apples it was like a whole new world opened up!

    Quote:
    By senior year for AP Computer Science they had built a new computer lab with current PCs that even had internet access, and we coded in Pascal or C++ I think, I don't remember.


    Yeah they didn't have that even when I graduated. The first time I attempted to code in C++ I failed big time, but then again it was outdated by the time I finished the class. :lol:
    Reply to g-unit1111
  27. we had pc lab to type papers for english class by the time i graduated but that was it. no internet and no computer science classes. in fact we still took typing on typewriters for years after pc lab was in place.

    wasn't until a few years later in college that we had net access. what an awesome thing that was. i took a job in the lab just so i could spend hours online every day. sucked having to go to class and leaving the net behind. got hooked quickly.
    Reply to Math Geek
  28. jdlech said:
    My very first computer was a commodore 64. I splurged for 2 disk drives, and a killer accelerator card that had a built in hex editor. It allowed me to edit the disks directly - it was the ultimate hack tool, back in the day. People today talk about all the protections that Maxis includes in their software. Much of that protection was first developed on, and for, the commodore computer.

    For $1000, I became the proud owner of an original IBM 4.77MHz 8086 computer, complete with 640K of RAM, a 170K 5 1/2" floppy drive, a 10Mb hard drive, a hercules monochrome graphics card, a 'green screen' monitor, and a super cool 9 pin dox maxrix printer.
    It was my first IBM. The day I got it home, I started looking at all the wonderful toys that came with MSDOS 1.1. That's how I discovered that one can wipe out the hard drive without realizing it. Lucky for me, there was a guy in town who could put it back together for me, for a small fee.
    And naturally, the very day I got it back home, I did the same thing again.
    On the third trip to his workshop, he sat me down and explained what the various programs do. He taught me how to not crash the hard drive, but also how to put it back together if I do.
    I was hooked.
    From there, I bought all the OSs. Zenith DOS, IBMs PC DOS, MS DOS, and Digital Research DR DOS. All had their quirks, bugs and merits. I started combining versions and utilities to get the best of them all.
    Now, the thing about these computers is that only 256K was on the motherboard. The rest was on a separate memory card. And the clock crystals were soldered onto the boards. It was nothing at the time to buy faster crystals and solder them in. I managed to speed up the bus to just under 6MHz before the first board failed. I remember it was my memory expansion card that failed first. I didn't know it at the time, but I was overclocking before overclocking was a thing.
    After reviewing all these versions of DOS, I recall telling my father that if he gave me $10K, I would retire a millionaire. Even as a teen, I knew MS was going to win the DOS wars and become big... real big.

    But eventually, all my friends started joking about me literally turning my computer on and going for a cup of coffee in the time it took for my machine to boot up. So I splurged for a 12MHz 286. What was funny is that the 25MHz 286 was the latest and greatest. And I remember a quote from a rep at the computer convention in Vegas that year. He said "The 25MHz 286 was more computer than most people will ever need"
    My 286 sported 1Mb of memory - which introduced me to upper memory. And I eventually expanded it to 2Mb, which introduced me to expanded memory.
    This was about the time I started getting "The computer shopper" delivered to my door - by that time it was bigger than even the biggest telephone books.
    Then I bought myself a 25MHz 386sx with 2Meg of extended memory. By this time, the only DOS still in business was MS. 3.11 was the standard, and 4 was on the way. At this time, I became a self taught expert in Quarterdecks QEMM and Qualitas QMax. I got pretty good at combining the two and even wrote a basic program that optimized the creation of upper memory blocks, and finding the most efficient order to load programs and data into them. Then I fell in love with Deskview386.
    At the time, I was heavy into electrical engineering and Pspice. So I paid a premium price for that Cyrix 387 mathco. It was the ultimate math chip. And it was a miracle worker. But, as luck would have it, a buddy of mine pulled it out one day to look at it. He never grounded himself. When he plugged it back in, it was DOA. I still had all my electrical designs and simulations, but simulating a single cycle went from a few minutes back to half a day.
    I was not all that impressed when Windows 1 came out. I heard it called "the most expensive solitaire game ever", and I agreed. But then W.2 came out. Once Windows 3 came out, I knew DOS was dead, even if Deskview worked better than W1 and 2.

    I had been out of the game for a couple of decades. I missed the whole pentium revolution. So once I got the chance, I decided to see what I could do. I built my own last year.
    Windows 10 - free, of course
    Asus maximus VIII hero mb
    4.0GHz 6700 processor
    32GB 4400 DDR4
    Geforce 980Ti graphics card.
    4x SATA3 SSD RAID 0
    Nothing is world record breaking, but it's a ton more computer than I'll ever need. (seriously, I'm a half century old, and the most processor intensive games I play are Stellaris, Civilization, and SimCity. I must admit - I just don't see why so few people use 4 drive RAIDS. The bus between memory and drive is clearly the most common bottleneck these days. SSDs are a bit better, 2 drive RAIDS are OK but they really miss the big benefit of RAIDs. But imo, a 4SSD RAID0 makes everything lightning fast.


    My God !!! Other than I stuck it out thru the Pentium years, we live the same life .... ROFLMAO
    Some fond memories of getting DOS to make that computer sing :)
    Reply to Yogi2367
  29. My high school had a dozen TRS 80s with a casette tape recorder attached. There was 1 external 5 1/4" floppy drive for the entire classroom. You have to do some serious programming before they would let you use it. Funny thing was, "serious progamming" meant BASIC. FORTRAN, and maybe a little PASCAL.
    Reply to jdlech
  30. i learned basic on my TI-85 calculator. odd as i used it for years before but never fully understood it until i had to program my calc for college.

    we took a class on the calculator and had to learn to program it. many of my engineering/architecture classes required programs to answer the questions. now that was fun times :-)
    Reply to Math Geek
  31. Sometimes I miss my old C-64: "The Computer you could buy from K-Mart". Everyone had either that, or the inferior Vic-20 because our parents were convinced by the media that "in the future everything was going to computerized so you better get your kids ready". I'm not sure any of the stuff I learned on that system, which honestly was little more than:

    Load "*",8,1
    Run

    has really been that helpful in my current position. But I did have a lot of fun with that computer and still remember going to the mall and going to Babbages and seeing C-64 games lining every wall floor to ceiling.
    Reply to Jeff Kaos
  32. i remember a friend had a Com-64 and his parents used to get the magizine for it. it had programs you could input and save for the system. but of course it was the actual code and you had to input it all which took days if you were really fast at it.

    me a my friend used to spend days typing in the programs so his mom could have a calendar to keep tabs on things. it did not save events and such it only printed out a calendar you could then write on!!

    man those were the days.
    Reply to Math Geek
  33. Math Geek said:
    i remember a friend had a Com-64 and his parents used to get the magizine for it. it had programs you could input and save for the system. but of course it was the actual code and you had to input it all which took days if you were really fast at it.

    me a my friend used to spend days typing in the programs so his mom could have a calendar to keep tabs on things. it did not save events and such it only printed out a calendar you could then write on!!

    man those were the days.


    I totally remember those codes in magazines. Even the "instruction manual" that came with the computer had a dozen codes to do stuff like that. I remember spending 3 hours coding a stick man doing jumping jacks and not understadnig there was a way to save the stuff I was typing so once I saw the little stick man doing jumping jack for five minutes I turned off the computer and lost all that work. Fun times. At least I had "Airborne Rangers" to play.

    And here's an interesting piece of C-64 trivia: you could play games using a Sega Genesis controller but only the "B" button and movement "cross" worked. The Commodore computers were configured to use the same controllers ports that the Atari 2600 used for input. One day in the late 80's I wanted to play a game but my Atari joystick was long broken. I noticed the Genesis controller had the same port so I hooked it up and it actually worked really well. That gave me a year or 2 more life out of the system. But then I graduated high school and decided girls and concerts were more fun than video games. Now I'm too old for concerts and I have a wife. So now I think video games are cool again.
    Reply to Jeff Kaos
  34. Jeff Kaos said:
    Math Geek said:
    i remember a friend had a Com-64 and his parents used to get the magizine for it. it had programs you could input and save for the system. but of course it was the actual code and you had to input it all which took days if you were really fast at it.

    me a my friend used to spend days typing in the programs so his mom could have a calendar to keep tabs on things. it did not save events and such it only printed out a calendar you could then write on!!

    man those were the days.


    I totally remember those codes in magazines. Even the "instruction manual" that came with the computer had a dozen codes to do stuff like that. I remember spending 3 hours coding a stick man doing jumping jacks and not understadnig there was a way to save the stuff I was typing so once I saw the little stick man doing jumping jack for five minutes I turned off the computer and lost all that work. Fun times. At least I had "Airborne Rangers" to play.

    And here's an interesting piece of C-64 trivia: you could play games using a Sega Genesis controller but only the "B" button and movement "cross" worked. The Commodore computers were configured to use the same controllers ports that the Atari 2600 used for input. One day in the late 80's I wanted to play a game but my Atari joystick was long broken. I noticed the Genesis controller had the same port so I hooked it up and it actually worked really well. That gave me a year or 2 more life out of the system. But then I graduated high school and decided girls and concerts were more fun than video games. Now I'm too old for concerts and I have a wife. So now I think video games are cool again.


    Airborne Rangers ... WOW ... major flashback ... LOL
    Almost makes me want to go digging for parts and see if I can get an old 286 running again ... LOL
    Reply to Yogi2367
  35. Math Geek said:
    think us older folks have a bit more appreciation for the new tech having dealt with the old stuff. i hated using a mouse early on as i was very good at navigating windows with the keyboard. most of those old commands are still there and i use them all the time. younger folks are usually amazed at how quickly i can move through windows without touching the mouse.

    that and being able to work with dos command prompt. that's all we had for a long time before windows. funny to see younger folks bash linux as "command line nerd stuff" when that's what we started with and learned on. i can still man handle a pc with command line stuff rather easily despite it falling out of favor.

    odd was that my dad actually got into games on the pc before i did. he fell in love with catacomb abyss and spent many hours playing it. i preferred to do other things such as spend time on those new fangled bbs dial in boards. that was quality time well spent :)


    I get the same response from using the keyboartd to navigate windows, still trying to teach others how to do it - even simple things like printing and copy/paste. Don't even think about trying to teach them how to use DOS - how oftern have you had people say - "What is DOS?" Love using it in front of the tounger generation who think they are better at using PC's than we older generation, and see the confused "What are you doing" look on their rfaces.
    Originally started doing programing as a school subject in the early 70's when all we had were punchcards - boxes and boxes of the damn things ;) Back then we all used pen and paper, a book of log tables and slide rules as there were no calculators. They even had us using a abacus for some maths problems. And there was only one computer in the second largest city in our state (Townsville, Queensland, Australia) and it was a mainframe.
    I suppose I have used the windows start screen for so long, it is probably why I hate so much using the new GUI in win 8 through to 10 - I use Statisbback to revert it. Still don't understand why they just threw it away and replaced it with such a odd GUI for a desktop, especially after microsoft spent so many years refining it. Although I use a tablet occasionally with the new win 10 and the new GUI is fine when using a touch screen ,but just horrible in a desktop. I suppose I am also used to having a neat desktop, plain background with only a couple of icons and folders on it, so all those tiles in the middle of the screen just looks messy and disorganised to me. I know how to remove the titles via windows, but found that just left a black hole in the middle of the screen.
    Reply to ifIwasarichman
  36. ifIwasarichman said:
    Math Geek said:
    think us older folks have a bit more appreciation for the new tech having dealt with the old stuff. i hated using a mouse early on as i was very good at navigating windows with the keyboard. most of those old commands are still there and i use them all the time. younger folks are usually amazed at how quickly i can move through windows without touching the mouse.

    that and being able to work with dos command prompt. that's all we had for a long time before windows. funny to see younger folks bash linux as "command line nerd stuff" when that's what we started with and learned on. i can still man handle a pc with command line stuff rather easily despite it falling out of favor.

    odd was that my dad actually got into games on the pc before i did. he fell in love with catacomb abyss and spent many hours playing it. i preferred to do other things such as spend time on those new fangled bbs dial in boards. that was quality time well spent :)


    ... Love using it in front of the tounger generation who think they are better at using PC's than we older generation, and see the confused "What are you doing" look on their rfaces.



    Heck, just using simple commands thru CMD like "ping" and "tracert" confuses the younger generation. When you switch into formatting, and disk partitioning, etc .. it just sends them into a head spin ... LOL
    Reply to Yogi2367
  37. not too long ago i did a simple ipconfig through cmd prompt to get the default gateway for the router and did literally laugh out loud when the teen sitting there asked what i just did and what all those numbers were. he was supposedly the "tech guy" in his house and with his friends as he so proudly boasted.

    i guess tech guy to him meant he knows how to sync an ipad with itunes.
    Reply to Math Geek
  38. Math Geek said:
    not too long ago i did a simple ipconfig through cmd prompt to get the default gateway for the router and did literally laugh out loud when the teen sitting there asked what i just did and what all those numbers were. he was supposedly the "tech guy" in his house and with his friends as he so proudly boasted.

    i guess tech guy to him meant he knows how to sync an ipad with itunes.


    So you have random teens inside your house? :O
    Reply to turkey3_scratch
  39. turkey3_scratch said:
    Math Geek said:
    not too long ago i did a simple ipconfig through cmd prompt to get the default gateway for the router and did literally laugh out loud when the teen sitting there asked what i just did and what all those numbers were. he was supposedly the "tech guy" in his house and with his friends as he so proudly boasted.

    i guess tech guy to him meant he knows how to sync an ipad with itunes.


    So you have random teens inside your house? :O




    Uh oh... the cops have been called! :lol:
    Reply to g-unit1111
  40. was actually at someone else's house setting up the wifi for all the various devices and port forwarding for the xbox and PS systems.


    so call off the cops now. i swear those screams were only sound effects for Halloween that i forgot to turn off from last year...........yah that's the ticket.......was a soundtrack for Halloween.

    Reply to Math Geek
  41. Math Geek said:
    was actually at someone else's house setting up the wifi for all the various devices and port forwarding for the xbox and PS systems.


    so call off the cops now. i swear those screams were only sound effects for Halloween that i forgot to turn off from last year...........yah that's the ticket.......was a soundtrack for Halloween.


    I was joking. :lol:

    Yeah I'm in the middle of figuring out the Wifi connection for my parents' new security cameras. It's a gigantic PITA. :lol:
    Reply to g-unit1111
  42. g-unit1111 said:


    Yeah I'm in the middle of figuring out the Wifi connection for my parents' new security cameras. It's a gigantic PITA. :lol:


    To me, "WiFi" and "security cameras" should not exist in the same sentence.
    But that's just me...
    Reply to USAFRet
  43. USAFRet said:
    g-unit1111 said:


    Yeah I'm in the middle of figuring out the Wifi connection for my parents' new security cameras. It's a gigantic PITA. :lol:


    To me, "WiFi" and "security cameras" should not exist in the same sentence.
    But that's just me...


    ssh it's fine


    props to anyone who figures out that small message
    Reply to XxD34THxX
  44. XxD34THxX said:
    USAFRet said:
    g-unit1111 said:


    Yeah I'm in the middle of figuring out the Wifi connection for my parents' new security cameras. It's a gigantic PITA. :lol:


    To me, "WiFi" and "security cameras" should not exist in the same sentence.
    But that's just me...


    ssh it's fine


    props to anyone who figures out that small message


    Ha. Ha.. Ha...
    Reply to turkey3_scratch
  45. You didn't get it did you.
    Reply to XxD34THxX
  46. XxD34THxX said:
    You didn't get it did you.


    Yes I actually did get it.
    Reply to turkey3_scratch
  47. Ive been in a marriage with a custom build since 2000 win xp/p4. Ive had to replace 2 hdd's a psu upgrade the ram all over a decade ago. Asus mobo pentium 4, agp geforce 7800. She is still my main computer, I still play c&c generals age of empires on it. I wanted to stay faithful to her til she died, but one game, "Sang-Froid - Tales of Werewolves" has made me decide to get a younger cheaper model. I hope she has it in her core to delete me.
    Reply to apoc2020
  48. that was about the greatest post i have ever read about how we feel about our tech :D

    BRAVO!!! BRAVO!!! BRAVO!!!

    you do almost feel like your cheating when you get the new tech. left my share of broken tech hearts in my wake. when it comes to my tech, i am a world class player
    Reply to Math Geek
  49. Math Geek said:
    that was about the greatest post i have ever read about how we feel about our tech :D

    BRAVO!!! BRAVO!!! BRAVO!!!

    you do almost feel like your cheating when you get the new tech. left my share of broken tech hearts in my wake. when it comes to my tech, i am a world class player


    lol, right on. We need a tech shrine!
    Reply to apoc2020
  50. it's called the members system thread :D

    lot's of GREAT eye candy there to drool over
    Reply to Math Geek
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