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I need help finding more about a monitors specifications

http://www.acer.com/ac/en/GB/content/professional-model/UM.HB6EE.018

Is this a 10-bit monitor because it says it has "1.07 Billion Colors"?

Does it have a VESA mount?

Does it have low blue light and flicker-free technology?
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  1. Best answer
    100% not a 10 bit monitor, they start at thousands.

    However, if the gradients are so good to the point where it's hard to tell where the edges are, displays can be considered 10 bit, because you wouldn't notice the difference anyways.

    Problem is, this (much) faster flickering, can sometimes leave artifacts behind, therefore not all displays are created equal, so the more you spend, the better quality FRC (FrameRateControl).

    Because that display is marketed as having access to display 1.07 billion colors, it means that it's a 8 bit + 10 bit FRC display. They just want to use the higher number (for obvious reasons) when marketing their product.

    It doesn't seem to support VESA. The images aren't clear enough, and there are no comments or reviews which can confirm it has VESA support.

    Low blue light and flicker free technologies are completely useless in every sense of the word. They're nothing but marketing tricks, however it's still a valid explanation. In the end, even though they don't make it clear, all the different manufacturers are referring to CVS (ComputerVisionSyndrome), which is a real problem among users and their displays.

    However, low blue light and flicker free are not and cannot reduce or remove CVS symtoms, but rather the user has to make sure the display is being used properly to minimize the effect and or symtoms of CVS. Helpful tips on top of my head:

    - Increase distance from display
    - Match color temperature of your room
    - Lower brightness
    - Blink more often
    - Use matte display coatings
    - Avoid a fan or strong wind blowing into your eyes

    A helpful program which reduces blue light would be F.lux, or Gunnar glasses which you may have heard of, a lot of pro gamers use these for long sessions. They serve a purpose, not just a marketing gimmick.

    There's no evidence yet that flicker free reduces eye strain and or headaches in any way shape or form. Studies have been made without disclosing sources, and it's just typical in the marketing world. It's unfortunate, but that's the reality we live in.


    All the best!
  2. Anonymous said:
    100% not a 10 bit monitor, they start at thousands.

    However, if the gradients are so good to the point where it's hard to tell where the edges are, displays can be considered 10 bit, because you wouldn't notice the difference anyways.

    Problem is, this (much) faster flickering, can sometimes leave artifacts behind, therefore not all displays are created equal, so the more you spend, the better quality FRC (FrameRateControl).

    Because that display is marketed as having access to display 1.07 billion colors, it means that it's a 8 bit + 10 bit FRC display. They just want to use the higher number (for obvious reasons) when marketing their product.

    It doesn't seem to support VESA. The images aren't clear enough, and there are no comments or reviews which can confirm it has VESA support.

    Low blue light and flicker free technologies are completely useless in every sense of the word. They're nothing but marketing tricks, however it's still a valid explanation. In the end, even though they don't make it clear, all the different manufacturers are referring to CVS (ComputerVisionSyndrome), which is a real problem among users and their displays.

    However, low blue light and flicker free are not and cannot reduce or remove CVS symtoms, but rather the user has to make sure the display is being used properly to minimize the effect and or symtoms of CVS. Helpful tips on top of my head:

    - Increase distance from display
    - Match color temperature of your room
    - Lower brightness
    - Blink more often
    - Use matte display coatings
    - Avoid a fan or strong wind blowing into your eyes

    A helpful program which reduces blue light would be F.lux, or Gunnar glasses which you may have heard of, a lot of pro gamers use these for long sessions. They serve a purpose, not just a marketing gimmick.

    There's no evidence yet that flicker free reduces eye strain and or headaches in any way shape or form. Studies have been made without disclosing sources, and it's just typical in the marketing world. It's unfortunate, but that's the reality we live in.


    All the best!


    I was thinking the same thing, do you think it is worth waiting until prices drop for the 10-bit monitors? Is a true 10-bit considerably better than an 8-bit + 10-bit FRC?


    Also, I believe there is some truth to low blue light and flicker-free technology. This website (http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/content/pulse_width_modulation.htm#side_effects) explains how flickering backlights cause eye strain. I'm even using a monitor with these features and compared to my previous display it's helped reduce my eye strain, however it could just be a coincidence.
    The reason why I want a new screen is because I want a larger monitor and 4k resolution but I'm not sure if I should wait for 10-bit to become mainstream enough until prices drop.
  3. No, it's just an explanation of that it's possible it's a cause for eye strain, not that it is a cause of eye strain, HUGE difference.

    Safe to say that if people find eye strain from PWM then it's safe to say that they would get that from a lightbulb, and they also wouldn't be able to go to the theater. They would have other issues and would need to speak with their optician and eye doctor.


    All the best!
  4. You're not going to be staring at a lightbulb for 10+ hours a day unlike a computer screen. If you go the the theater it will only last a few hours and besides eye strain occurs in people who are exposed to PWM for a prolonged period of time and combined with blue light it just makes things worse.
  5. But the light is flickering, the lightbulb is just the source of the light, you don't have to stare at the lightbulb, the lightbulb is going to light a room, as they were designed to. :P

    For the record, it's not blue light directly hitting you coming from a display, they want you to think that though. In my opinion it's a weak argument, because one would be much more worried about cancer than CVS.

    Again, really no evidence of that being the cause of CVS (yet).


    All the best!
  6. Yes probably not but I would love if more research was done into this though. However, if the tips you mentioned earlier are followed it should prevent or in the very least reduce eye strain so in the odd chance there is a problem I will just follow them.

    Thank you for your help!
  7. I'm with you on that one. I too want more testing to be done, but the thing is, manufacturers would never confirm that their products are based on a placebo experience, or if it's actually a cause for CVS.

    Today, someone getting an eye strain and without the including factors of above solutions to minimize CVS, it's the equivalent of saying CVS is caused by flicker and blue light, the source being a big "maybe".

    I don't even know anyone or have seen someone take extreme actions as posted above to minimize this effect, so it's not yet possible to prove or prove wrong, so we have to assume it's a rumor, that's the only right thing to do.


    No problem, I love helping people on Tom's.


    All the best!
  8. if it were 1 bit it be worse graphics then the first nitendo games lol the old 8 and 16 bit carts lol
  9. as for completely flicker fre it have to be at least 120 hz or 144 hz monitor hell they got 240 hz sont gamign monitors and crap out already
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