SSD as long term storage devices....

With the advent of 2TB SSDs beginning to hit the market I have started to look towards them as potential long term storage devices. I intend to use them to store my encoded video files which are currently stored on various hard drives and burnt onto dual layer 8.5GB DVDs. The exception would be files I encoded that are larger than 8.5GB which are only stored on the hard drive.

The question I have is how viable are SSDs for long term storage? Meaning how long is it's potential shelf life since data will only be written to a sector once, but will potentially be read many times.

I am not sure if I will buy the 2TB SSDs or wait for consumer level 4TB SSDs. I am definitely not going to cough up the $6k+ for a 4TB San Disk Optimus Max SSD.
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  1. jaguarskx said:
    With the advent of 2TB SSDs beginning to hit the market I have started to look towards them as potential long term storage devices. I intend to use them to store my encoded video files which are currently stored on various hard drives and burnt onto dual layer 8.5GB DVDs. The exception would be files I encoded that are larger than 8.5GB which are only stored on the hard drive.

    The question I have is how viable are SSDs for long term storage? Meaning how long is it's potential shelf life since data will only be written to a sector once, but will potentially be read many times.

    I am not sure if I will buy the 2TB SSDs or wait for consumer level 4TB SSDs. I am definitely not going to cough up the $6k+ for a 4TB San Disk Optimus Max SSD.


    http://www.pcworld.com/article/2856052/grueling-endurance-test-blows-away-ssd-durability-fears.html
  2. I use my 750gb ssd as my main drive and mirror it to a 3tb 7200rpm Seagate hdd. test have shown that they last longer than you would keep your system. 840 evo under heavy writing conditions was like 25 years and is rated for 7 years.

    http://www.maximumpc.com/endurance-test-shows-your-ssd-might-have-legs-last-1000-years-2014/

    this link shows 2 petabytes of data written to the 840 evo(in my rig in sig) I think we are ok with the longevity issue of ssds

    OF COURSE YOU SHOULD BACKUP BACKUP BACKUP, but you knew that already.LOL
  3. I am not really concerned about the endurance of the SSD in the amount of re-writes it can handle before it simply dies. As stated, I will be storing my video collection to the SSD so each sector will only be written to once.

    What I am more concerned about is data retention / electronics deterioration. For example, I copy my files to the SSDs, store them away and 10 years later I want to access the data again.
  4. Yeah, I was thinking about getting up to 10TB worth of storage capacity; 5 2TB SSDs, then back them up onto 5 more 2TB SSDs.
  5. jaguarskx said:
    I am not really concerned about the endurance of the SSD in the amount of re-writes it can handle before it simply dies. As stated, I will be storing my video collection to the SSD so each sector will only be written to once.

    What I am more concerned about is data retention / electronics deterioration. For example, I copy my files to the SSDs, store them away and 10 years later I want to access the data again.


    then you will be removing its power source correct?
  6. Yep. No power whatsoever.

    The backup of my backup would probably be vacuumed sealed in heavy duty plastic storage bags (think Food Saver device) to protect against dust and moisture.
  7. well ssd's are nothing more than really fast usb flash drives. you don't loose your data when the device is not plugged in. I don't no about 10 years tho. I have learned that if you aren't writing over it a lot it retains data longer. for instance if you write to one time an put it on a shelf it will last longer in terms of holding that data. so if it past or in the middle of its endurance rating (being used in writing and rewriting) it will not last on the shef as long. you pose a hard question..
  8. Flash storage comes in three different common storage media: Flash drives, SD cards, and solid state drives (SSDs). eHow says flash drives can last up to ten years, but as mentioned on NYTimes.com, flash memory doesn’t usually degrade because of its age, but rather because of the number of write cycles, which means the more you delete and write new information, the more quickly the memory in the device will start to degrade. Since all these devices are similar in that they all use flash memory, they’ll all degrade in a similar fashion. However, one thing is certain: better hardware will pay off. Given the variety of manufacturers, lifespan might differ quite a bit from one device to another, but flash memory devices rated for more write cycles will usually last longer. When it comes to flash drives and SD cards, you’ll likely lose them or ruin them in the washing machine before anything else happens.

    http://www.storagecraft.com/blog/data-storage-lifespan/

    the link I got that from
  9. Yeah, I realize my question is rather difficult to answer because I will not be using the SSD as it was intended to be used. I suppose my concern is more focused on actual hardware failure due to potential deterioration as a result of time.

    I am guessing SSDs are have better potential longevity compared to Bluray / DVDs and hard drives. Dyes can deteriorate over time and the plastic layers that makes up a disc can separate. Hard drives have mechanical parts that are more prone to failure compared to to solid state components like SSDs.
  10. jaguarskx said:
    Yeah, I realize my question is rather difficult to answer because I will not be using the SSD as it was intended to be used. I suppose my concern is more focused on actual hardware failure due to potential deterioration as a result of time.

    I am guessing SSDs are have better potential longevity compared to Bluray / DVDs and hard drives. Dyes can deteriorate over time and the plastic layers that makes up a disc can separate. Hard drives have mechanical parts that are more prone to failure compared to to solid state components like SSDs.


    I quess if you bought the correct tech of nand(longer life) and only wrote to it once it would last the longest. its the writing upon writing that's truncates its longevity. being devoid of power doesn't effect its data retention capabilities.. you could check it, say every year or two to see if the data is starting to degrade. as you know, no storage media last indefinitely. except maybe a 45 or 33 LP. LOL now I am showing my age...
  11. Don't forget the good 'ol chisel and stone tablet. They are pretty indestructible....


    Unless you are "Butter Fingers" Moses in History of the World Part 1.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I48hr8HhDv0
  12. jaguarskx said:
    Don't forget the good 'ol chisel and stone tablet. They are pretty indestructible....


    Unless you are "Butter Fingers" Moses in History of the World Part 1.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I48hr8HhDv0


    hahahahaHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!
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