The Motherboard tier list

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Motherboard tier list
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  1. I find this VERY inaccurate in the lower tiers.

    Some examples:
    -You have relatively high end FM2+ boards and solid but lower end Z97 boards in tier 5 right along side complete junk am3+ boars that are 6 years old.
    -You have the 970A-G46, a motherboard known to burn, in the same tier with a $200+ x99 board. Makes no sense.

    I could go on and on. For this list to be any kind of accurate, you must do separate tier lists for each socket, or at the VERY least explain that you CANNOT compare boards of different sockets using this list. Otherwise it really holds no value. Beyond this I have issues within the same socket groupings as well: The fact that you have ANY Z97 board in the same tier as a $45 H81 board is ridiculous in my opinion. They are not even in the same realm.

    There are ALOT of variables for each board you are not considering at all.

    I'm not trying to be rude or overly critical, but in all honesty I do not really agree with 60-70% of this list or find it accurate.
  2. I don't think a motherboard tier list can ever be accurate , everyone has different experiences and needs.

    Not a good idea in my opinion.
  3. tiny voices said:
    I find this VERY inaccurate in the lower tiers.

    Some examples:
    -You have relatively high end FM2+ boards and solid but lower end Z97 boards in tier 5 right along side complete junk am3+ boars that are 6 years old.
    -You have the 970A-G46, a motherboard known to burn, in the same tier with a $200+ x99 board. Makes no sense.

    I could go on and on. For this list to be any kind of accurate, you must do separate tier lists for each socket, or at the VERY least explain that you CANNOT compare boards of different sockets using this list. Otherwise it really holds no value. Beyond this I have issues within the same socket groupings as well: The fact that you have ANY Z97 board in the same tier as a $45 H81 board is ridiculous in my opinion. They are not even in the same realm.

    There are ALOT of variables for each board you are not considering at all.

    I'm not trying to be rude or overly critical, but in all honesty I do not really agree with 60-70% of this list or find it accurate.

    +1. While I applaud the effort, there are far too many variables (and products for that matter) for this to be meaningful. tiny voices provides some excellent points for consideration.
  4. This isn't very accurate. All Gigabyte Black edition boards should be higher in the list, as they has been tried and tested for a week in very serious conditions.

    You have Home Theater optimized boards such as the Gigabyte F2A88X-N WIFI in tier 5, when they have Wireless AC and decent overclockability.

    The Gigabyte Z97 SOC Force, which broke world records in Core i7 overclocking speeds, is in tier 2?

    Where's ECS' and Biostar's motherboards?

    I'm sorry, but IMHO, this list only focuses on overclockability, instead of value for money, stability, audio quality and more.
  5. tiny voices said:
    I find this VERY inaccurate in the lower tiers.

    Some examples:
    -You have relatively high end FM2+ boards and solid but lower end Z97 boards in tier 5 right along side complete junk am3+ boars that are 6 years old.
    -You have the 970A-G46, a motherboard known to burn, in the same tier with a $200+ x99 board. Makes no sense.

    I could go on and on. For this list to be any kind of accurate, you must do separate tier lists for each socket, or at the VERY least explain that you CANNOT compare boards of different sockets using this list. Otherwise it really holds no value. Beyond this I have issues within the same socket groupings as well: The fact that you have ANY Z97 board in the same tier as a $45 H81 board is ridiculous in my opinion. They are not even in the same realm.

    There are ALOT of variables for each board you are not considering at all.

    I'm not trying to be rude or overly critical, but in all honesty I do not really agree with 60-70% of this list or find it accurate.


    Thank you for the reply,

    I understand your concern. FM2+ boards will be appropriately moved higher, the troublesome MoBos will be eliminated or will be appropriately labelled. Other non-uniform features shoulde be eliminated too, I'll try my best.

    On a side note, the list does compare all the sockets and chipsets alike, the basis being chiefly the Thermals and Power phases (essential in OCing and stability of CPU) and PCIe config. Yes it is not completely accurate to put a Z97 against a X99, but the very reason for this list to exist is to tier similarly featured (not socket or chipset) in the same tier. I mean, the list tries (certainly not succeding right now) to combine the desired features under a single tier. I'm hopeful you've read the first spoiler, but just a pre-cap:

    All tier one MoBos are 4 way SLI capable, similarly, all MoBos w/o proper thermals on VRMs have been tiered lower. I know I must have missed on some, but, for your last opinion about tiering Z97 and H81 in the same tier, I'd like to explain that the MoBos (namely, Pro3 and Anniversary) do not have CFX capability.

    If you're challenging the very concept on which this tiering is based, I completely understand, and we shall talk further about this in order to make this list better.
  6. No hardware tier list is accurate , because not all experiences and reviews are the same.
  7. Thank you all for the replies, I shall reply to each (or collectively if needed) soon. Right now, I'm having some difficulty in updating the list, I'd like a moderator's help. I've put 'bold', 'italics' and many other codes on many places in the list, which're being correctly shown in preview but not on the product page, I can PM the code page (the BBCode buttom is not showing the correct code either). Thanks again.
  8. It's not like the PSU list. In the PSU list you work your way down the list in terms of quality. On this list, you have EXCELLENT quality H81 boards in the same category with 6 year old AMD boards that would fry with a 125w CPU installed.

    The difference is there are no tier 5 PSUs that are good in any circumstance, but here you have some VERY good H81 boards with no faults or shortcomings. You have them rated low because they do not have SLI, overclocking, only 2 RAM slots, when that is EXACTLY what they are DESIGNED FOR. They are GOOD at their purpose, yet you still have them on the bottom of the list.

    If this this was even close to accurate there should be H81 boards in tier 1, because there are some AMAZING value for money H81 boards with no shortcomings at all.
  9. I see, and completely agree. But looking at various comments above, do you think sorting this out in terms of usability ('actual purpose' the MoBo is designed for) in mind will even be useful? Is a Motherboard list (with all the positives from the above comments absorbed) ever practically useful? I know I've spent a lot of time on this (wrong direction though, nevermind) but if the idea itself isn't practical, will it not be a waste? I'm completely ready to change the concept around it, as the arguements have due weight.
  10. In all honesty I do find the concept of this list not practical or really useful.
  11. tiny voices said:
    In all honesty I do find the concept of this list not practical or really useful.


    Agreed. My question actually was, will making this list more practical make it more accurate? I know this is fairly dumb but it has it's own complications. I now plan to do the following:

    Completely rebuild it, NOT based on power (or perhaps raw power) ratio.
    More like on core-purpose and value for what you pay. As mentioned, H81 has it's own purpose and shall be given due weightage. Tiering shall also include build quality (MSI's QC issues in mind).
    Most probably a list for each chipset. I'm willing to atleast give it a try. What do you say about the purposed reconstruction?
    Will this make this list better?
  12. MSI has no quality control issues anymore aside form TWO AM3+ boards. Their 1150 boards are quite good. The QC issue is really a thing of the past people hold onto for no reason. They currently have the same RMA rate as ASUS for motherboards.

    I think those changes will not really help the credibility of the list and in all honesty I do not think a worthwhile, all encompassing motherboard tier list can ever really be made. Sorry.
  13. And, not to forget everyone else, COLGeek, SR-71 Blackbird, dottorrent, thank you all for your valuable inputs.

    I'm certain now this list is of little practical use right now, and I'm hopeful I can make it better. Give this list some time to adjust in to the right concepts. I'll take care of that and will report back with a better, more practical list. Till then, I'm taking it down (I hope I'm not breaking a forum rule by doing so).
  14. No problem at all.
  15. The list will be worked upon after a brief period of time, 20 Nov to be exact, as I've to complete some assignments currently. So, if it is not inappropriate, mods please feel free to delete this thread. I'll be back after the said date, and it may take some days to edit it.
  16. SR-71 Blackbird said:
    No hardware tier list is accurate , because not all experiences and reviews are the same.


    This is an excellent point.
    VRMs that are fine in a well-ventilated case with air cooling may die smoking if an AIO liquid cooler is used.
    I think some context is needed. It's a great effort, but think of it like a fantastic kettle of stew, loaded with prime ingredients, but something's missing, like NO salt, or maybe too much chili powder. Almost, but not quite...
    I agree that breaking it up by socket would help avoid apples-to-potatoes comparisons.
  17. SR-71 Blackbird said:
    No hardware tier list is accurate , because not all experiences and reviews are the same.


    In fairness, I think the same thing could be said for all tier lists. That doesn't make them any less viable for the novice or casual builder. Not everybody has the same experiences or end result with every PSU, GPU, CPU cooler, fan, case, CPU or any other piece of hardware. Since most of the people these tier lists are made for only need a general structuring to show "overall" quality and performance, I don't see the list as being irrelevant or impossible at all.

    There are several motherboards, from different OEMs, that an overwhelming majority of experienced users recommend versus those they recommend when there's a budget involved. So there's no reason to not have a list to rank them thusly. None of those PSU units on the tier list ALWAYS perform to the standard by which they are held to according to the lists. I've had to RMA two faulty Seasonic PSUs, an XFX and an Antec just since I joined here in June. They still belong where they are on the list though.

    Those who know what to look for and where to look, don't need a tier list. And those who don't, either do need a ranked list of some sort or some other kind of widely inclusive guide or they end up here wanting to know why their POS component has failed. If there is no structured guide or list to at least provide food for thought, it's impossible for the novice to have much chance at choosing reliable components without just buying the most expensive hardware their budget will allow and hoping for the best.

    I think we all know that the most expensive isn't always the best choice. I think the motherboard tier list is just as viable as any other tier list so long as it's generally understood that it's just a guide, not a be all and end all definitive purchasing bible.

    Do I want to build the list? No. But if somebody is going to take the time necessary to gather and compile the information in a manner that presents in a generally well thought out way that is at least fundamentally accurate, I'll certainly be glad to reference it to those seeking guidance. If you consider how many times the PSU tier list has likely deterred somebody from purchasing a Thermaltake TR2, Raidmax, FSP Raider, NZXT Hale or MSI PSU they were planning to buy based on name alone, you could easily see where it's usefulness begins to come into play.
  18. Onus said:
    This is an excellent point.
    VRMs that are fine in a well-ventilated case with air cooling may die smoking if an AIO liquid cooler is used.
    I think some context is needed.


    I agree, but also consider that PSUs that are mounted in the top of a case will die more quickly than those bottom mounted as well, no different than in your example. It doesn't change the fact that the general quality of one is better than another and thus supports it's positioning on a list. And yes, there are still cases being made and sold that place the PSU at the top of the case, even though the numbers are few and far between these days.
  19. I do think you need to include the entire motherboard model number when listing them though. We know what you're talking about when we just see UD3 or UD5 on the Z97 list, but the average person is not going to know what it is referring to without it's actual model or series number.
  20. Thanks darkbreeze, I'm certain a MoBo list is possible (that is why attempting it a second time, this is the link to the original 'feature' based list, currently taken down), and by all means not perfect, but atleast useful as a reference. And for the model number, please check out the list via your Email, I've colored it by their manufacturers, like Green for GB, Gold for Asus and so-on. Is mentioning the complete model number still relevant? I can add it if it makes a difference over color scheme.
  21. I think it does, at least for the average user. We forget sometimes that the mainstream user doesn't see or equate hardware in the same terms we do and for them I think the more black and white we can make things, the easier it is for them to absorb and apply the information. Also, if somebody happens to skip over the key and doesn't see the indications for color, they will still be able to determine the identification that way.


    I don't think you need to say, for example, ASUS Sabertooth 990fx R2.0, just Sabertooth 990fx R2.0 would suffice, or Maximus VII Hero instead of just Hero, since there are a few versions. Along with the color and chipset to define the board identification, I think that would be fine. Plus, there are way too many boards with model numbers that are very similar to not expressly list the exact model number. I think having the color makes sense in addition to that though, because if for instance they are only interested in ASUS motherboards, and they do see that all the ASUS boards are one color, they can easily scan the chipset tiers for only boards of that color.


    As another example, some boards with the exact same model number, but with Wi-Fi or AC or a different revision on the end could get mistaken for the similar, but not same, model, that isn't necessarily on the same tier.


    One example that definitely highlights this is that the Gigabyte GA-970A-UD3P, GA-970A-D3P, GA-970A-UD3 and 990FXA-UD3 are all DRAMATICALLY different boards but the model numbers are so similar they could easily be misinterpreted by a novice or even in some cases by a more experienced user. If you just said UD3 or D3P, you could be lumping together two different boards that have severe differences.
  22. I see, and will make sure such similarities do not exist, boards will be clearly distinguished in all sensible manner before the list is put up. A new builder in general may not be aware of the limitations of 970 chipset vs 990FX(or X), so it makes sense to clearly put the whole model number for conveniance. But as you said, putting Brand name will not make much difference so I'll skip it.
  23. I, for one, look forward to seeing this when it gets closer to ready. I'll be glad to offer any opinions I might have at that time also, understanding as well, that they are just that, my opinions and views, which may not necessarily reflect reality or anybody else's opinions at all. And often don't. Heh.


    I don't know if it's possible to do with BB code like you would with HTML or another scripting language, but it might be decent to have a short TOC at the top of the list that correlates to a specific part of this list, and when clicked, takes you directly there. So if I clicked on the 990FX link it would take me directly to tier 1 for that chipset. The reason I suggest this is that by looking at the tier list and realizing how long it's likely to be in comparison to say, the PSU tier list, it might be somewhat confusing to scroll through the whole list to find what you want.


    Just a thought. I have those sometimes. They usually aren't good for much aside from causing my mouth to move, but I can't seem to stop them from happening so I guess I just have to live with it. Heh.
  24. Thanks, I'm excited to how it's building up. And with multiple opionions and eyes monitoring it, it's bound to be more accurate.

    Also, I've been thinking about TOC as well, and I plan to put each chipset in a series of consecutive replies (One chipset in one reply) , as I'm not that familier with BBCodes and I've no idea how to link different parts of same page (poor me). Also, MoBo list is going to be comprehensively bigger than PSU or GPU list, it contains more than 100 models for Intel LGA1150 itself, if I counted them right. So TOC makes absolute sense.

    If someone can enlighten me about making TOC w/o keeping chipsets in different replies, that'd be great. I'll see if I can manage a way through it myself though.

    And, your thoughts are much appreciated. I'm usually at a loss w/o suggestions lol.
  25. MeteorsRaining said:
    And, your thoughts are much appreciated. I'm usually at a loss w/o suggestions lol.


    That makes, well, most of us. Communities of all kinds exist for a reason, and this is one of them.
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