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Thermal Paste Removal/Installation Guide - page 2

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  1. The idea behind the paste and grease is to make the transfer of the heat as smooth as possible (sort of).

    So, if you think that any non-metal material you put on top of the heat spreader of the CPU will handicap that, the less you put, the better.

    Now, how does the paste or grease helps making it smooth? Well, first of all, it makes the "rough" surfaces (at a microscopic level, off course) blend with each other, maximizing contact between them. Then comes the paste or grease itself's heat conductivity (you can search for the usual formula for it, according to material used) that won't be better than any metal put for the Heat Sink of Heat Spreader.

    So, the argument in favor of "less is more" applies only if:

    1.- You successfully cover 90%+ (100% if you spread it manually, off course) of the Heat Spreader area once the Heat Sink comes on top of it. And...
    2.- The layer of paste or grease is thin enough to let the 2 metals make contact with each other in most of the area surface they can (this is a "help, but not obstruct" idea). In this regard, some pastes have metal in them to help this somewhat (ArticSilver5 has it's name out of this, I think, lol).

    My 2 cents.

    Cheers!
  2. Yuka said:
    The idea behind the paste and grease is to make the transfer of the heat as smooth as possible...

    *Then*

    ...the less you put, the better.


    Posabsitivelutely! :heink:

    Which is why I think the Indigo Extreme stuff is genius. The procedure for applying it involves melting the stuff so it flows between the microscopic valleys of even the flattest, mirrored surfaces. Then the springs on your heatsink mountings can pull the surfaces as close to each other as possible, allowing as much metal-to-metal contact as the flatness of each will allow.

    I will definitely be using the IX solution on my next build.
  3. Too bad it's so expensive. :non: $18 for 2 installations!? NOPE!
    http://www.svc.com/1156-x1.html
  4. amuffin said:
    Too bad it's so expensive...


    Yeah but it's permanent, doesn't dry out. One time and your good for the life of the installation.

    Besides, I'll pay $18 for 2 degrees cooler any day!
  5. Ladamyre said:
    Yeah but it's permanent, doesn't dry out. One time and your good for the life of the installation.

    Besides, I'll pay $18 for 2 degrees cooler any day!

    I'd rather spend that $18 on a much better fan(s) that will reduce your temps even more. [:lutfij:4]
  6. amuffin said:
    I'd rather spend that $18 on a much better fan(s) that will reduce your temps even more.
    Yeah, I guess if you're on a budget maybe the fan is a priority.

    Maybe you could get your girl to forgo one night at the movies, then you'd have enough for the fan and the IX twice over!
  7. You wouldn't be on a budget if you're going to spend $18 on a fan or paste!
  8. amuffin said:
    You wouldn't be on a budget if you're going to spend $18 on a fan or paste!
    Then I don't understand your objection. You can have both the fan and the IX if you're not on a budget.
  9. I'm saying no one would spend $18 on a fan or paste if they had a tight budget. I'm saying they wouldn't have a budget (in the sense that they are rich) because they can spend $18 on paste or a fan.
  10. I get it. I was just trumpeting my sense of priorities. It's not about being rich per se. If I was short I'd tell the woman, "I take you to the movies next week, this week I'm spending $30 on my computer."

    I wonder, could that be why I'm still single?

    Which makes me wonder, could that also be why I'm basically a happy man?

    *thinking*

    Yup! That's it alright.
  11. I plan on getting a GF sometime after I start highschool (next year), maybe in my Sophomore or Junior year :whistle:
  12. Oh don't wait! It's never too early to start having that fun. Just remember me when you look down and see an ankle bracelet with a chain on it attached to a 40lb steel ball...

    ...or see the chain from your wallet that used to be attached to your belt has been moved to her purse strap...

    ...or notice a chafing, rough, dog collar has been around your neck and you don't remember when she put it there.

    Then you'll know what I'm talking about.
  13. hehe :kaola:
  14. e56imfg said:
    Great guide but paper towels? No. Coffee filters are the way to go.

    Anything but liquid metal TIM would work. Liquid metal will just destroy your aluminum HSF and the top of your CPU (along with its warranty)

    I've found that coffee filters are very effective as well, as I would hesitate to use anything that left a residue on my CPU.

    Additionally, I've never replaced my thermal paste (Arctic Silver 5) for the four year life of my computer, and I've never had any problems.
  15. Nice review. I've found that using alcohol for the first few wipes and then just using the paper towels since they aren't wet usually grab the old paste better, making it easier to remove.
  16. dude , since u installed the 212 evo , after i installed mine it looked like its 1~2 mm away from fully covering my cpu
    some thin like this
    *top view

    http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/4952/cpuheatsink.png

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us
  17. So... um... move it up a little. You might have screwed it in unbalanced.
  18. Um, what.....?

    The base should be on top of the cpu.
  19. amuffin said:
    Um, what.....?

    The base should be on top of the cpu.

    ill reinstall it and post back :pfff:
  20. That was totally fine, unless the pressure was uneven. The CPU is much smaller than the CPU heatspreader, and you do not need to cover the outer edges.

    Oh, and you used too much paste and I prefer coffee filters because the are lint free :)

    You can also use the individual alcohol swabs found in the first aid section.
  21. The instructions on my Arctic Silver 5 said to 'tint' both surfaces by rubbing in a micro layer of paste. Then apply a gob the size of a grain of rice to the CPU and spread it thin.
  22. That's new, but I like it. Makes sense.
  23. Too many instructions!!! :fou:
  24. JoeMomma said:
    The instructions on my Arctic Silver 5 said to 'tint' both surfaces by rubbing in a micro layer of paste. Then apply a gob the size of a grain of rice to the CPU and spread it thin.


    That sounds like it could possibly trap air under the film or between it and the layer above. I think I'd prefer just to put the blob on and let it fill the gaps itself.
  25. randomizer said:
    That sounds like it could possibly trap air under the film or between it and the layer above. I think I'd prefer just to put the blob on and let it fill the gaps itself.

    ^+1000000000000
    Let the weight of the CPU cooler spread the paste.
  26. amuffin said:
    ^+1000000000000
    Let the weight of the CPU cooler spread the paste.


    The problem with that is the paste has a big chance of spreading un-even over the surface. I've found out after 2 or 3 different times, that manually spreading the paste covering 100% of the CPU metal cap (what was it called? :P) yields better results. You gotta be extra careful while doing it though, so no dust or air-thingies fall before you put the HSF.

    Cheers!
  27. I intend to get the exact cooler and paste used in this guide - so thanks to amuffin for this guide, makes life easier.

    I have a small question - in the amd_app_method_middle_dot pdf (the file that as5 recommends to follow for an amd phenom II proc) there is a section called "Tinting the Heat Sink and Metal cap" - I am not sure I follow the steps in the pdf explain it to me. Can someone explain it in the context of the hyper 212 evo and as 5? That would really help me when I get down to doing this in 2 days time :)
  28. Well, as I understand it:

    Apply a little bit of paste on both surfaces and then spread it with something (coffee filters could be a good idea) so that the "surface imperfections" on each (the Heat Sink and CPU Top) are minimized. And by little, it really means a little. Like 1/4th of a drop or even less. Then the paste applied afterwards on the CPU top will be better "joined" with the Heat Sink. This is how I understand it, off course.

    Cheers!
  29. Thanks guys :)
  30. Back in my day (LOL) of Athlon XP-M's, you put a dot (half a grain of rice) of AS5 on the CPU and used a razor blade to smooth it out until it looked like a sheet of gray paper.
  31. I've seen some guys take a small piece of glass and press it on top of the small grain size to get a pretty flat application.

    Indigo Extreme is cool too...
  32. Quote:
    personally I think you used too much paste...

    but very good 'stickie'.
    well deserving.


    with that heatsink, no he didn't, i too have this heatsink, it has ridges along the heatpipes where it collects thermal paste and prevents it from spreading on evenly, i had to apply the AS5 to the heatsink directly in order to avoid this issue... this is my second CoolerMaster product like this.

    and frankly, it is really really annoying.
  33. Yuka said:



    that link, has one very disturbing image in it....
    linked below, queezy should not click...
    http://img.gawkerassets.com/img/17qhlvkb7nrwzjpg/original.jpg

    Last image in that thread also has a picture of spiders of which the retard called "Brown Recluses" which they are not, the brown recluse only spins web when laying eggs, on a side note, they are more tanish brown than dark brown on their abdomen which here appears dark brown, and these spiders were spinning funnel style webs, a very VERY common trait of any common "Wolf Spider" which is not harmful at all, and very hard to mistake with a brown recluse, once you actually see one. Idiots will be idiots though.
  34. Jonathanese said:
    I wonder if that red stuff can be used as TIM? :kaola:


    Anyway, even with systems with heat spreaders, wouldn't there still be an advantage to spreading the thermal paste over the simple line method? It seems like no matter the TIM, the line method would still place too much in the middle, and not take advantage of all that extra real-estate for transfer. I figure, if you go ahead and spread it out, you only have as much TIM as you need in the center, but also allow better heat "bandwidth" so-to-speak. I say this, because I'm about to get a direct touch heatpipe cooler, and if I only use the line method, I'm making decent contact with only one of the three pipes. But in spreading it, I take advantage of every square-inch of the cooler and IHS.


    i seen a video on youtube that used cheese as thermal paste, and it seemed to work pretty well too.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16qSDmMO3zQ
  35. Ladamyre said:
    Yeah but it's permanent, doesn't dry out. One time and your good for the life of the installation.

    Besides, I'll pay $18 for 2 degrees cooler any day!


    ONLY 2 DEGREES???? SERIOUSLY?

    kinda weak for the price don't you think?
  36. you can see anywhere from 0 degrees to 10 degrees diffrence applying new thermal paste. let me give you a tip, if your cpu has a heatspreader then in fact all you are doing is replacing the thermal paste on the heatspreader and not infact the chip as the chip is under the heatspreader which is glued with epoxy glue, so u will still result in overheating if u are having overheating issues. like the ps3's people change the thermal paste on the spreader where in fact i take the heatspreader of and apply new paste to the chip and glue the heatspreader back down with epoxy glue.
  37. First, props to the OP for taking the time to post the guide. But:

    1) Use a thermal compound that doesn't need any curing time and is not harmful to your skin. These compounds also usually last 5-6 years. If you're the kind of person who has to periodically get the newest and best, 5-6 years is more than enough time. A fine example is Arctic Cooling MX-4, which is a carbon-based compound.

    2) No matter what type of thermal paste you use, the best way to apply it is to place a pea-sized amount on the center of the heatspreader, and just let your heatsink do the spreading. This is a tried-and-true method for maximum cooling performance.
  38. Do I need to remove the thermal past that is on my new heatsink or is that sufficient?
  39. liamus said:
    Do I need to remove the thermal past that is on my new heatsink or is that sufficient?


    No. If you're swapping heatsinks and the new heatsink has thermal paste already applied, then just clean the paste off the cpu (I prefer rubbing alcohol) and install the new heatsink. Clean the old heatsink before storing.
  40. Remove paste on the cpu, then install the 212 with the cm paste.
  41. Just a post to remove the annoying invisible post flag.
  42. amuffin said:


    I see what you did there, those fans look deadly spinning so fast with no cage to protect fingers~
  43. 100'th Reply :)
  44. Sweet, thank you, you live and learn
  45. i might get flamed for this but...

    that big line of thermal paste is WAY to much. your not trying to fill a .25 inch gap.you are only filling in the peaks and valleys of the two surfaces which could be microns in size.you only need a little drop in the middle.And this is only what i do...i rub it around with my finger to cover the entire cpu surface where the heat sink is going to contact.then i put my heatsink on and thats all.you dont need all this arctic silver and high metal flake whatever. I have a big bottle of cheap heatsink compound and it will last me the rest of my life.And no you dont have to change it like the oil in your car.only scrape off the old stuff and reapply when you take off the heatsink if your doing somthing that would require that.

    in all the years ive been a computer tech ive never had computers overheat from how i do it.people put way to much thought and waste money on this.if 1 or 2 degrees is the difference between your whole system getting fried then you have other issues then your heatsink compound. Also using too much will cause your cpu to run hotter;more is not better.
  46. If you use your finger, you'll add grease to the paste, which lowers it's thermal conductivity. If you're gonna spread it, use anything but your fingers (or anything that adds grease or dirt for that matter). Even worse, could affect the thermal compound, thanks to the human's acid pH.

    Cheers!
  47. Yuka said:
    If you use your finger, you'll add grease to the paste, which lowers it's thermal conductivity. If you're gonna spread it, use anything but your fingers (or anything that adds grease or dirt for that matter). Even worse, could affect the thermal compound, thanks to the human's acid pH.

    Cheers!



    I dought there is enough greese or dirt to effect anything from the tip of your finger.unless you have been working on your car or digging in the flower garden.
  48. Like you said, this works on a microscopic level, so yes there is enough in the tip of your finger to affect.

    I'm being purist though, since if you wash your hands and then you apply it right away, there will be almost no external agents that affect. Still, not a good idea to tell people to use their fingers, since most compounds are toxic to some degree.

    Cheers!
  49. I started reading another guide here http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/How-To-Correctly-Apply-Thermal-Paste/274/3 and got to this part:

    "Unfortunately, the use of those compounds “from the factory” has some inconveniences. The first one is that they can be used only once. If you remove the cooler for some reason, you’ll have to clean the old compound and apply the original one again (which is hard to find) or apply thermal paste instead."

    I'm baffled. There is some fundamental difference between thermal paste and thermal compound? Why would the cooler not work with a different compound?
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