CPU Heatsink on a Hard Drive?

Anyone done this before?

I have the heatsink part of an old CPU cooler spare - thought I could mount it (somehow...thermal adhesive?) on top of the hard drive to remove some heat?

I have airflow through the same area so I figured this could work.

Could it damage it?
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  1. this is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard.

    a CPU heatsink has a contact area the size of a CPU. if you want to keep your HDDs cool get a 3.5in bay cooler.
  2. Why is it so rediculous? I feel my HD, it feels warm, so I put 2 and 2 together??

    My old stock heatsink has a massive surface area, not just cpu sized, so figured it might work.

    Advice taken though, i wont bother.
  3. If you feel your hdd is hot why don't you download HWMonitor.
    This will tell you exactly what temp it is.
    Never seen my hdd over 35C btw which is very cool.
    Anything under 50C is considered fine.
  4. Thanks Davcon - was confused with this software - I always thought it was the same as CPU-Z!!

    I'll give it a go.
  5. Hello guys!

    Do you know where you can download CPU-Z and Prime95?
  6. 39 Degrees on my Hard drive. This is before I mount a 120mm fan right on the middle of it...


    ...is 39 degrees ok for now?
  7. thats more than okay. its cool. its not uncommon for hdds to be at 60 degrees or above.
  8. Thanks mate :)
  9. mrsav25 said:
    Anyone done this before?

    I have the heatsink part of an old CPU cooler spare - thought I could mount it (somehow...thermal adhesive?) on top of the hard drive to remove some heat?

    I have airflow through the same area so I figured this could work.

    Could it damage it?


    I see nothing wrong with your idea. Speaking for the Seagate ST500DM002 drive, it sits in an aluminum frame with a cover probably made of steel since a magnet is drawn to it. That in itself acts as a heat sink. Placing a small fan on the cover (provided there is room in the drive bay) will air cool the aforementioned cover plate and will draw the temperature down drastically. A small fan designed for the motherboard chipset attached with clear silicone would be sufficient. Elevate the fan using several flat washers at the corners so the air hits the cover plate and then flows outward. Also, there are times when hard drives are operated externally using a USB to SATA hookup. This could be when the drive is being cloned, used as emergency backup, or when being wiped. During a wiping operation using one of the cCleaner tools, I noticed the drive getting very hot. I have a U shaped iron bracket measuring 4" x 3" x 2" that was salvaged from the wreaking of a communications cable rack. I simply laid the flat part of the bracket onto the cover side of the hard drive and within a minute, it was cool to the touch. So why then do the hard drive manufacturers not integrate heat sinking into the cover plate? Probably due to cost and they want you to buy multiple case fans to add to the annoying noise level. If you don't have a small chipset fan to glue to the cover plate, you can take the cover plate of an identical HD and flip it over, apply some heat conductive paste, then epoxy cement each corner down. So then you'll have back-to-back cover plates that will double the heat transfer, will be silent, and not require a 12-volt hookup. Don't let the naysayers discourage you as innovation always breaks the status quo.
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