EVGA SuperNOVA 850 T2 Power Supply Review

EVGA's T2 series consists of Titanium-rated PSUs with capacities ranging from 750 to 1600W. Today, we're looking at the 850W model, which tries to prove it is worth a premium compared to the company's Platinum-rated 850W offering.

EVGA is constantly expanding its already over-populated PSU portfolio with new products. Its manufacturing partner, Super Flower, recently released some lower-capacity Titanium-rated models, and EVGA grasped the opportunity to quickly add three new units to its T2 family. They hit 750W, 850W and 1kW capacity points; the company is also planning to introduce a 1.2kW model. In addition to the flagship 1600 T2 unit, this line-up will consist of five members once the 1.2kW version arrives, and we strongly believe it should include one or two more implementations under 750W.

In addition to 80 PLUS Titanium efficiency (which is currently the highest and toughest 80 PLUS certification), EVGA's T2 units feature fully modular cabling, semi-passive operation and a single +12V rail. The chassis design is shared between all of EVGA's high-end power supplies; its fan grille is the most notable feature.

The SuperNOVA 850 T2 outputs enough power to feed two or even three high-end graphics cards, depending on your vendor of choice, and a potent host processor. Of course, if you plan to overclock all of that hardware aggressively, pushing power requirements up, then you might want to consider a PSU with more capacity.

Based on our recent review of the SuperNOVA 850 P2, we're expecting to see even higher performance from the T2 model. The only issue right out of the gate is a huge price difference between both models, raising the question whether it's worth paying a premium for Titanium efficiency. Unfortunately, that label is still valued disproportionately compared to the Platinum rating, and until an even more efficient classification surfaces, we don't see this situation changing.

Specifications

All of this unit's features are high-end. However, something caught our attention in the list of protection capabilities. For starters, EVGA states that this unit (along with the other T2 models) includes over-current protection, which looks odd in a PSU with one +12V rail where OCP is normally meaningless. It was only later that we realized OCP can be applied to the minor rails as well, though most manufacturers don't list it. In addition, EVGA mentions that over-temperature protection (OTP) is present. But despite the ultra-tough conditions we threw at the 850 T2, we couldn't trigger it. Either OTP's activation point is set too high or it is just not implemented. According to our sources, OTP does exist. It's just that in every Super Flower platform review we've conducted, we've never encountered a shut-down due to the feature, even though we've applied operating temperatures close to 50 °C. Apparently, the OEM's engineers are super confident about the Leadex platform's resilience to heat.

EVGA insists on using double-ball bearing fans instead of the fluid-dynamic bearing (FDB) fans, which offer longer lifetime and lower noise output. Given this unit's price tag, we believe an FDB fan would be more appropriate. Then again, given an aggressive semi-passive mode, the fan doesn't spin most of the time anyway. And if you want to stave off higher internal temperatures, you have the option of disabling the semi-passive mode, letting the fan spin constantly with its speed controlled thermally.

The 850 T2's dimensions are normal given its capacity; however, its weight is increased. If you judge the quality of a PSU based on its heft, then this is definitely the model for you (of course we're joking, though we remember back before PSU reviews were popular and this was a recommended way to gauge quality). Finally, there's a lot to like about EVGA's 10-year warranty, though the 850 T2's price tag will make your eyes water.

Power Specifications

Rail3.3V5V12V5VSB-12V
Max. PowerAmps202070.82.50.5
Watts100849.612.56
Total Max. Power (W)850

The single +12V rail can deliver 850W of power alone, while the combined capacity of the minor rails looks low for a PSU at this capacity point. Nonetheless, 100W on the 5V and 3.3V rails combined should suffice for most systems. The 5VSB rail is unquestionably weak, though. Ideally, it should offer at least 3A.

Cables And Connectors

Modular Cables
DescriptionCable CountConnector Count (Total)
ATX connector 20+4 pin (600mm)11
4+4 pin EPS12V (700mm)22
6+2 pin PCIe (700mm)22
6+2 pin PCIe (700mm) / Six-pin PCIe (+150mm)22 / 2
SATA (550mm+100mm+100mm+100mm)14
SATA (550mm+100mm+100mm)26
Four-pin Molex (550mm+100mm+100mm+100mm)14
FDD Adapter (+100mm)11

There are enough cables to efficiently deliver this unit's maximum power. In total, you get two EPS connectors and six PCIe ones, all of which are made available at the same time. The number of SATA and peripheral connectors is pretty large as well. We noticed that EVGA provides four 6+2 pin PCIe connectors, while the rest only have six pins. In our opinion, all PCIe connectors should be of the 6+2 pin variety.

All of the cables are plenty long, and the distance between PCIe connectors is ample. The same goes for the distance between SATA connectors, though we'd like more space between the four-pin Molex ones since 10cm can lead to compatibility problems in some cases. Finally, in order to minimize voltage drops and offer better load regulation, EVGA equips the 24-pin ATX, EPS and PCIe connectors with thicker, 16-gauge wires, while the other connectors use standard 18-gauge wires.

Power Distribution

Since this PSU features a single +12V rail, we do not have anything to say about its power distribution.

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  • JQB45
    The 10 year warranty says it all.
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  • Lizard_of_Bodom
    I have G2 version of this one, it truly is a dead-silent and efficient beast, can handle a lot before fan spins up, and even then - its inaudible.
    Thumbs up, EVGA!
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