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Conclusion

Dual-Channel DDR3: Who Makes The Best 4GB Kit Under $150?
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Most of our memory shootouts are value-centric, focusing primarily on a chart that looks something like this:

If this were an ordinary review, the above chart might even show up in the winning company’s advertisements. But that’s not going to happen today, because this article was never intended to be a general value comparison. Anyone interested in seeing a pure-value article where Crucial does win an award can find it here.

Getting back to the theme of today’s article, we wanted to find the absolute best memory available for under $150, and we have a clear winner. Reaching a data rate more than 100 MHz higher than its closest competitor, G.Skill’s Trident DDR3-2000 (model F3-16000CL9D-4GBTD) took a clear lead that earns it an award. The fact that it was also able to run its rated DDR3-2000 at CAS 7 and our preferred DDR3-1600 at CAS 6 simply reaffirms its award-worthiness.

We recommend G.Skill’s Trident DDR3-2000 specifically for mid-budget overclockers who believe in the importance of memory speeds beyond those we’ve found to be beneficial to program performance.

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  • 0 Hide
    Silmarunya , 26 May 2010 03:00
    As nice as that Trident is, I see absolutely no point in buying it. Time and time again it has be shown there is no real world difference between 1333 and 1600 and when going over 1600MHz, even in synthetic benchmarks the difference becomes marginal.

    And how many rigs can actually use memory at 2000 MHz?
  • 0 Hide
    das_stig , 26 May 2010 03:07
    Now all we need is a comparision for 4GB laptop memory.
  • 0 Hide
    ksampanna , 26 May 2010 03:39
    Quote:
    Hard Drives WD VelociRaptor WD30000HLFS
    300MB, 10,000 RPM, 16MB Cache


    typo.
  • 2 Hide
    LePhuronn , 26 May 2010 19:17
    um Silmarunya...did you actually read the opening to the article?

    It states quite clearly that anything over 1600MHz is an overclocking part, and is purchased to ensure that the RAM can properly reach speeds required by the overclocker's choice of multiplier's and whatnot.

    So no, there's not point in getting faster RAM unless you NEED faster RAM to handle the numbers generated by overclocked settings.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , 26 May 2010 21:36
    Is it just me, or is OCZ a suspicious omission here?
  • 0 Hide
    damian86 , 27 May 2010 06:13
    You can forget it,OCZ is past. G.Skill rocks...
  • 0 Hide
    damian86 , 27 May 2010 06:15
    damian86You can forget it,OCZ is past. G.Skill rocks...
    It is just a shame that the heatspreaders are a problem in size.
  • 0 Hide
    asterix81 , 27 May 2010 18:18
    why A-data is not present on this test?
  • 1 Hide
    damian86 , 28 May 2010 02:19
    we are talking about modules that can pass the tests.I am sure A-data will fail them