Corsair Finds A Sweet Spot With TKL K63 Keyboard

Corsair makes a fine keyboard, but they’re often at the top end of the price range. Many of its “budget” options get you some Corsair quality at a lower price, but you sacrifice important features here and there. The company’s latest, the K63, is an effort to deliver almost all of the higher-end features at a price more gamers can afford, and it looks to be one of the best options for Corsair fans who don’t want to drop almost $200 on a high-end keyboard.

Filling A Gap

Here’s the quick list of goodies: The K63 has per-key backlighting, dedicated buttons for media controls, Cherry MX Red switches, and includes the CUE software for customization and configuration.

The one big feature it lacks is RGB lighting. It’s also tenkeyless, which some gamers will actually prefer (although there are certainly plenty of folks who require the numpad, and others who pine for the extra left-side bank of G keys).

But at $80, all of the above makes it a more attractive option than Corsair’s other budgety keyboards--the K65 ($90), K55 RGB ($50), K40 ($80), and K30 ($60). Compared to the K63, the K65 lacks backlighting (and CUE support, apparently)--and none of the others have mechanical switches. Therefore, the K63 is Corsair’s least expensive, backlit, CUE-supported keyboard.

Further, with all those feature at $80, it’s frankly a decent buy compared to much of the rest of the keyboard market.

But What About Those $100 Strafe Keyboards?

The next step up in Corsair’s keyboard catalog are the $100 Strafe series. The K63 beats them all by twenty bucks, which is already a win for the new kid on the block, but note that the Strafe keyboards lack that classic Corsair design. They have a textured plastic top panel, and they lack the top plate design so many Corsair fans love (and so many other keyboard makers have copied).

The Strafe keyboards do offer the extra textured key caps and give you more switch choices (Cherry MX Red, Brown, Blue, and Silent Red) versus the K63 (MX Red only).

But unless you have a strong preference for a switch type other than Red and don’t like the TKL form factor, the K63 is clearly a better choice. Again, it’s also $20 cheaper.

The next Corsair keyboard price tier up from the Strafe series is the K70 RapidFire and LUX keyboards, which start at $120--a whopping forty dollars more expensive than the K63. For just a bit more money than that, you can get a pretty nice gaming mouse. All you really get at that tier that the K63 lacks is the numpad and a wrist rest.

Fire Sale

If the K63 isn’t evidence enough that Corsair is pushing into the more budget-friendly segment, consider that many of its lower-end keyboards are currently on sale. The K65 dropped from $90 to $70, the K55 is down from $50 to $40, and the Strafe with MX Silent switches is down $20, from $100 to $80.

But if you want the best of Corsair at the lowest possible price, you can’t beat the $80 K63, which is available now.


Corsair K63

TypeTenkeyless
SwitchCherry MX Red
-Type: Linear
-Actuation force: 45gf
-Actuation point: 2mm
-Total travel: 4mm
Sensing MethodConductive (metal)
Onboard StorageYes, up to 5 profiles
Polling Rate1ms, adjustable 8ms, 4ms, 2ms in BIOS mode
Lighting-Red LEDs
-Dynamic lighting effects through CUE
CableRubber
Dimensions365 x 171 x 41mm
Weight1.12kg
SoftwareCUE
Misc.-Supports Windows Vista/7/8/10
-Requires PC with 2 ports
-Dedicated media buttons
-Assign macros with CUE software
-Windows lock
-Warranty: 2 years
Price$80
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