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Chrome OS Notebooks Will Be Windows-proof

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 2 comments

Don't look at one of these if you're into Windows.

The Chrome OS Notebook appears to be a rather basic system that's almost the perfect definition of a netbook. Like the early netbooks, the Cr-48 runs a non-Windows operating system and its primary purpose is to run a browser.

While Chrome OS aims to make things quite a bit more user-friendly compared to the early day 7-inch netbooks, there is always going to be the case where a user will ask where the start button is to find solitaire.

So will Chrome OS notebooks also have the option to dual-boot another operating system like Windows? Google says no, as "certified" Chrome OS notebooks will only be able to run the single operating system

Part of that may be due to Chrome OS's use of protected flash memory, which is great for security, but isn't so great for custom installs and for spaciousness.

Another detail Engadget picked up is that Google will be providing live customer support for its initial line of Cr-48 notebooks, even though they aren't commercial items. Google doesn't expect there to be many support issues, however, as it feels that the OS is simple enough for most users.

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    Silmarunya , 9 December 2010 21:01
    For a full size notebook, I'd consider that a significant disadvantage. For a netbook on the other hand, I couldn't care less. Netbooks aren't the sort of system where you want or even can afford to have multiple OS'es. Checking e-mail, playing a flash game and editing a word document every now and then don't require full blown Windows 7.

    Security and speed >>> customization (in a netbook, for a notebook you can have all of them with ease)
  • 1 Hide
    Vampyrbyte , 10 December 2010 01:08
    SilmarunyaFor a full size notebook, I'd consider that a significant disadvantage. For a netbook on the other hand, I couldn't care less. Netbooks aren't the sort of system where you want or even can afford to have multiple OS'es. Checking e-mail, playing a flash game and editing a word document every now and then don't require full blown Windows 7.Security and speed >>> customization (in a netbook, for a notebook you can have all of them with ease)


    I disagree, My netbook is a fully functioning and well built computer. If I didn't play games I could happily hook it up to my monitor with my keyboard and mouse and use it as my main, PC for all my work without switching between the two. I also dual boot Ubuntu on my Netbook as my Degree course requires I have access to a Linux based OS.

    My Netbook is far more powerful than the PC I used to use for everyday work and web browsing just 6 or so years ago. Back then I used to Dual Boot and customise as much as I could about my computer, with its 1.3Ghz Intel Celeron and 256MB of RAM.

    tl;dr Google know anyone with an amount of computer knowledge would just install a proper OS on these boys and enjoy getting a cheap Netbook. So they did their best to stop them.