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Benchmark Results: S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Call Of Pripyat

System Builder Marathon, Sept. 2010: Value Compared
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The Call Of Pripyat benchmark finally reveals a game engine where the $2000 system’s SLI configuration can shine.

The $400 PC appears playable, given these raw numbers, but low minimum frame rates in the benchmark’s “Sun Shafts” test would likely cause most users to drop to 720p.

The $2000 system continues its single-benchmark triumph through our highest test settings, though the mid-priced system is probably good enough for 1920x1200 game play.

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    silverblue , 10 September 2010 16:19
    I'm a little dubious as to why you'd even bother putting an X6 into such an expensive machine. I simply don't think it is necessary. Perhaps that CPU in a $1,000 build and an i7-930 or something in a $2,000 one?
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    Silmarunya , 11 September 2010 02:39
    silverblueI'm a little dubious as to why you'd even bother putting an X6 into such an expensive machine. I simply don't think it is necessary. Perhaps that CPU in a $1,000 build and an i7-930 or something in a $2,000 one?


    I must say I think it's a stupid idea to add a hexacore to a gaming system, no matter the cost. A Phenom II X4 965, i5-760 or i7-930 would all have been equal to or better than the X6 1055 for games, and the 965 and 760 don't cost more either.

    For the high budget build, an i7-930 would have been ideal as its clock for clock performance is far better than that of an 1055T.

    A pretty odd CPU choice if you ask me, for a gaming system at least.
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    silverblue , 11 September 2010 03:42
    At the very least, give it the 1090T.