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Sony Develops Powerful Laser for 1TB Optical Disc

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 9 comments

Let's hope Sony doesn't get the idea of attaching these things onto sharks.

The Blu-ray Disc Association may have just passed the BDXL specification that expands that capacity of Blu-ray media to 100GB, but the real roomy optical format of the future is being developed in a lab in Japan right now.

Sony and Tohoku University have created a laser that has a beam output that's in excess of 100 watts, which is more than a hundred times the world’s highest output value for conventional blue-violet pulse semiconductor lasers.

This latest successful development is an all-semiconductor laser picosecond pulse source with a laser wavelength of 405 nanometers (1 nm = one-billionth of a meter) in the blue-violet region. It is capable of generating optical pulses in the ultrafast duration of 3 picoseconds (1 picosecond = one-trillionth of a second), with ultrahigh output peak power of 100 watts and repetition frequency of 1 gigahertz.

What's even more remarkable, boasts Sony, is that that other ultra high-output laser devices require a bulky light source box and a specialist technician to ensure the stable operation of the laser. This technology, however allows for a much smaller lightbox and perhaps for a more automated process. 

Sony said that it has already tested applying this technology in next-generation large-capacity optical disc-storage, which could mean capacities 20 times greater than what we have now.

This laser technology could also be applied to a wide range of fields such as three-dimensional (3D) nano-fabrication of inorganic/organic materials. 

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  • -1 Hide
    tinnerdxp , 26 July 2010 22:31
    So where does the 1TB comes from?
    Only reference is "which could mean capacities 20 times greater than what we have now." - which would imply 100GB x 20 = 2TB...
  • 2 Hide
    aje21 , 26 July 2010 23:28
    tinnerdxpSo where does the 1TB comes from? Only reference is "which could mean capacities 20 times greater than what we have now." - which would imply 100GB x 20 = 2TB...

    Unless the 20x reference was to the current non-XL version of BluRay?
  • 0 Hide
    jamie_macdonald , 26 July 2010 23:31
    well even blueray as it stands still does not have a fast enough write speed to make filling a 50gb drive usefull for anything much at home.

    how increasing the capacity will help i do not know! ... blue ray still has yet to impress me .. released to early ... without decent hardware for writing and forced in by a corporate monopoly to sell more un-needed equipment,

    make the speed increase for write however and i will see it as usefull ;) 
  • Display all 9 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    malphas , 26 July 2010 23:50
    Optical media is dead.
  • -1 Hide
    shanky887614 , 27 July 2010 00:21
    optical media is not dead, nor will it die in the foreceable future becasue the cost of using them is so low

    one thing people forget is that when big buissness buy things like dvd's and hdd's they buy then in sets of a few hundred or thousand so they get them at half to a third of the cost to the average joe like me and you

    because of this they will quite happily use optical media where speed isnt an issue untill a viable cheap flash storage option becomes avalible
  • -1 Hide
    bv90andy , 27 July 2010 00:36
    jamie_macdonaldun-needed equipment

    I have to disagree... how else would we watch 1080p movies without blueray? High speed broadband is available to a very small percent of movie-lovers.

    malphasOptical media is dead.

    the same to you. Not many people have broadband to download HD movies. and with the upcoming 4k2k video we will need larger disks. Especially since Panasonic is already showing off its brand new 4k2k compatible display.
  • 0 Hide
    jodrummersh , 27 July 2010 01:42
    Funny thinking I put a blue-ray burner on my computer in '08 and the drives haven't gotten much better since then
  • 0 Hide
    Devastator_uk , 27 July 2010 02:05
    Does that mean the next generation of optical drive will require around 100W?
  • 0 Hide
    Clintonio , 27 July 2010 02:26
    Devastator_ukDoes that mean the next generation of optical drive will require around 100W?

    I hope they haven't looked over that fact, the last thing people need is their PC having power shortages just because they decided to watch a DVD.