Asus PG279Q ROG Swift 27-inch 165Hz Gaming Monitor Review

We have the highly-anticipated ROG Swift PG279Q in the lab today. It’s a 27-inch IPS-type panel with QHD resolution, G-Sync, ULMB and an unprecedented 165Hz max refresh rate.

If you’re more than a casual game-player then Asus’ Republic of Gamers series of products should be very familiar to you. Users looking to build a no-holds-barred rig can literally create an all-Asus system made up of premium components the deliver only the highest performance.

The monitor portion of the line includes several models that run at 144Hz and support both FreeSync and G-Sync adaptive refresh rates. Last year the very first G-Sync display to hit the market was the 27-inch ROG Swift PG278Q. It was also one of the first screens to support 2560x1440 resolution at 144Hz. The only downside? It’s TN-based.

Since we reviewed it gamers have been patiently waiting for more IPS gaming monitors to appear. In early 2015 the gates finally opened and several shiny new products became available. Asus was once again at the front of the pack with the MG279Q FreeSync monitor. And Acer followed quickly with its XG270HU. Both are based on the same excellent panel part and did extremely well in our tests.

But leave it to Asus to trump all with the worlds-first 165Hz computer monitor – the ROG Swift PG279Q.

Asus turns to AU Optronics for an AHVA panel in the 27-inch size running at QHD resolution. Native refresh is 144Hz but an overclock option is incorporated into the OSD that allows rates up to 165Hz over DisplayPort. Each screen is tested for stability before leaving the factory so you can be sure that every sample runs at the advertised speed.

We’ve looked at other AHVA monitors before and we want to make sure there’s no confusion. AHVA is a variation of IPS that offers superior off-axis performance. It’s not the super-high contrast AMVA technology seen in screens like the Philips BDM4065UC and BenQ XR3501. So what you have here is essentially an IPS screen with better viewing angles and all the other benefits associated with the tech.

The PG279Q is a premium product and no gaming features have been left out. In addition to a 165Hz panel you get Nvidia’s G-Sync adaptive-refresh technology, ULMB motion-blur reduction, GamePlus, a hot-key to switch framerates on the fly and the usual lineup of gaming-specific image modes. It’s an impressive package wrapped in a nicely-styled chassis with a solid stand. There is no doubt that you’ll call attention to yourself when you show up at a LAN party with one of these.

The price is high-end as well – over $700 at this writing. But if you buy one now, you’ll be getting a completely unique product and what is likely to be the ultimate gaming display for at least the near-future. Will it measure up to the hype? Let’s take a look.

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  • chris987
    will this race to even higher refresh rates ever stop?
  • nate1492
    FresSync isn't free. Freesync still requires hardware. It just isn't proprietary hardware and can be provided at a cheaper cost than the GSync. And that also means FreeSync can be done with poor hardware that is cheaper, that's why you see weird freesync ranges like 45-75 fps.