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PC Upgrade plan?

So earlier this year I bought a very entry pc just so I could get into pc gaming as soon as possible. I now have a part time job and I’m looking to start upgrading over time which was my original plan because I want to be able to run current AAA games and beyond better including division 2.
Notable specs include:

Would appreciate all and any advice, thanks in advance :)
12 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about upgrade plan
  1. Are you using those components to upgrade the entry level PC you got?
  2. jojesa said:
    Are you using those components to upgrade the entry level PC you got?


    No. The components listed are the entry pc
  3. unsafegamer said:
    So earlier this year I bought a very entry pc just so I could get into pc gaming as soon as possible. I now have a part time job and I’m looking to start upgrading over time which was my original plan because I want to be able to run current AAA games and beyond better including division 2.
    Notable specs include:

    Would appreciate all and any advice, thanks in advance :)


    And your question is? Which should you upgrade first? The ryzen 2200 to the 2600. will help a lot but first the 2GB 1050 has to go. I would upgrade to nothing less than the 1070 but that is about $370 which can take a while to save but imo a simple bump to the 1060 would be unjustified and unimpressive.

    1070
    2600x
    16GB RAM kit.
  4. unsafegamer said:
    jojesa said:
    Are you using those components to upgrade the entry level PC you got?


    No. The components listed are the entry pc


    What's your budget?
  5. An rx580/gtx1060+ would be a good start. Depending on the game later on you might need more ram. A ryzen 2600 would be nice. But I don't think it's going to be necessary.
  6. jojesa said:
    unsafegamer said:
    jojesa said:
    Are you using those components to upgrade the entry level PC you got?


    No. The components listed are the entry pc


    What's your budget?


    Kind of unlimited because all my earnings are just savings. But that doesn’t mean I’m just joing to go for a 1080 because I’m only interested in 1080p 60fps
  7. aquielisunari said:
    unsafegamer said:
    So earlier this year I bought a very entry pc just so I could get into pc gaming as soon as possible. I now have a part time job and I’m looking to start upgrading over time which was my original plan because I want to be able to run current AAA games and beyond better including division 2.
    Notable specs include:

    Would appreciate all and any advice, thanks in advance :)


    And your question is? Which should you upgrade first? The ryzen 2200 to the 2600. will help a lot but first the 2GB 1050 has to go. I would upgrade to nothing less than the 1070 but that is about $370 which can take a while to save but imo a simple bump to the 1060 would be unjustified and unimpressive.

    1070
    2600x
    16GB RAM kit.


    Do you recommend in the ordered the list?
  8. tejayd said:
    An rx580/gtx1060+ would be a good start. Depending on the game later on you might need more ram. A ryzen 2600 would be nice. But I don't think it's going to be necessary.


    I was kind of thinking this. I might change to a fully modular power supply because my case doesn’t have good cable management, or just get a better case too. (Currently cooler master master box lite). I imagine I should get a aftermarket cooler for the 2600? I am considering rx 580/90 rn because of the free games promotion. I think I’ll also upgrade the mobo
  9. Best answer
    Suggested upgrades:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($170.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB AMP! Edition Video Card ($239.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $530.96
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-06 14:12 EST-0500

    This'll give you a rough idea as to the total cost.
    The GPU can be substituted for an alternative, as can the RAM but the 2600 is by far the best value gaming CPU available to you.

    Suggested route: GPU>CPU>RAM.
    The CPU is the cheapest of the two major upgrades but it won't give a really spectacular performance boost because it'll be held back by the current GTX1050, on the other hand, swapping out the GPU will have an instant, and very significant effect on gaming because the current CPU isn't a truly terrible gaming part ( but it's not a fire breathing i9 either ;) ).

    Right now the R 5 2600 is the best bang-per-(fill in your local currency here ) gaming CPU out there, for rather more, the 2600X is a little faster and comes with the superior Wraith Spire cooler, just be sure your MB has the latest BIOS to support it fully.

    Finally, RAM, this is the last part I think you should change, I've listed 16Gb but you can game in 8Gb if you keep other running tasks under tight control.
    Ryzen likes fast memory, hence the modules are quick, but if you decide 8Gb is enough for your needs, I'd be very tempted to leave well alone and save your money by keeping the existing modules.

    You list your RAM as 2666, is this the rated speed or the overclocked ( XMP/DOCP ) speed, some do get a little confused and some RAM will overclock to higher speeds with a little patience.
  10. coozie7 said:
    Suggested upgrades:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($170.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB AMP! Edition Video Card ($239.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $530.96
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-06 14:12 EST-0500

    This'll give you a rough idea as to the total cost.
    The GPU can be substituted for an alternative, as can the RAM but the 2600 is by far the best value gaming CPU available to you.

    Suggested route: GPU>CPU>RAM.
    The CPU is the cheapest of the two major upgrades but it won't give a really spectacular performance boost because it'll be held back by the current GTX1050, on the other hand, swapping out the GPU will have an instant, and very significant effect on gaming because the current CPU isn't a truly terrible gaming part ( but it's not a fire breathing i9 either ;) ).

    Right now the R 5 2600 is the best bang-per-(fill in your local currency here ) gaming CPU out there, for rather more, the 2600X is a little faster and comes with the superior Wraith Spire cooler, just be sure your MB has the latest BIOS to support it fully.

    Finally, RAM, this is the last part I think you should change, I've listed 16Gb but you can game in 8Gb if you keep other running tasks under tight control.
    Ryzen likes fast memory, hence the modules are quick, but if you decide 8Gb is enough for your needs, I'd be very tempted to leave well alone and save your money by keeping the existing modules.

    You list your RAM as 2666, is this the rated speed or the overclocked ( XMP/DOCP ) speed, some do get a little confused and some RAM will overclock to higher speeds with a little patience.

    The ram speed is the speed on the box, I had to select the Xmp profile.
    I think I might upgrade my case to a nzxt one too as well as a fully modular power supply
  11. unsafegamer said:

    The ram speed is the speed on the box, I had to select the Xmp profile.
    I think I might upgrade my case to a nzxt one too as well as a fully modular power supply


    When you select a motherboard, then get RAM that had been tested to run at that speed on that particular motherboard. You will find a QVL on the motherboard manufacturer support page.
    If you do that then the RAM usually run at stated speed out-the-box.
  12. Sorry 'bout the late reply, didn't realise I was spending so much time in Destiny 2! :)

    Yep, the RAM is running at its advertised boosted speed, some get confused about the different speeds available for the modules and run at the much slower JDEC speed as opposed to the faster XMP/DOCP one.

    If you DO decide to upgrade the RAM AND keep the existing MB-and I'll suggest you only change it if the new MB has a feature you can't live without-try to find modules on the QVL list, the older Ryzen MBs can still be a little picky about what memory you install.

    To ease the search for RAM: Go to PcPartPicker here: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/ and leave it open in a tab, then open a new tab for the QVL list. There, use the mouse to highlight a part number so you can ' COPY ' it, move over to the PartPicker tab and ' PASTE ' the part number into its search box, hit search an voila, you'll know if that part is available.

    Your call on the case and PSU, but a good quality 550Watt unit will drive a non overclocked R5 2600/2600X+GTX1060/1070 easily enough, and here's a list of the better ones: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/631048-psu-tier-list-updated/

    If the PSU is up to the job, maybe you'd want to think about setting the money aside for a SSD instead, no need to get fancy for a pure gaming rig, 2.5" SATA drives are very nearly as fast in this usage as the more expensive PCI-E NVM-E M2 drives, meaning you can get a larger capacity drive for the same outlay.
    A quick comparison of a decent 650W PSU Vs a pair of SSDs:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Storage: Crucial - MX500 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($72.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Walmart)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $287.87
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-07 13:52 EST-0500
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