Solved

when my vs650 dies will it destroy my pc

When i was talking to some people they said when my vs650 dies since it has thin wires it will take down some parts when it dies is this true?
17 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about vs650 dies destroy
  1. I think most likely not.

    It's possible....but I've dealt with a lot of PSU failures and usually the PSU just takes itself out.

    The reason I say it's possible is...if something were to short or fail in the PSU in such a way that it causes one of the voltages to increase beyond specification, then something else could be damaged.
  2. the psu does not have all the high end protections that better units have. however it has basic ones built in which should keep it from frying the rest of the pc. this is of course not 100% since even a high end one can damage stuff if the right stuff happens.

    your friend knows very little since he mentioned thin wires as the problem. really the problem is the lack of all the built in power protections that would shut the thing down if a problem happens. a power surge is probably the biggest concern but then that's true with all electronics.
  3. Corsair VS-series is low quality PSU while for example, anything from Seasonic is either good or great quality.

    To put it short: the better the PSU build quality - the less of a chance of it frying anything else when PSU goes sky high. Also, better build quality PSUs doesn't die as often as lower build quality PSUs.

    Following is more of a guideline than actual rule:
    great quality PSU - 5% chance of other component dying
    good quality PSU - 10% chance of other component dying
    mediocre quality PSU - 25% chance of other component dying
    low quality PSU - 50% chance of other component dying
    crap quality PSU - 90% chance of other component dying + 50% of chance PSU catching fire
  4. david2017au said:
    When i was talking to some people they said when my vs650 dies since it has thin wires it will take down some parts when it dies is this true?


    It might.
    I had a green label CX600 kill off one of my motherboards.

    But its not "the thin wires".
  5. So my psu has a 50 percent chance of killing off my computer
    is this psu good Corsair CX650 650W Power Supply
    seasonic is extremely expensive in my region the cheapest is 99 dollars
    Is there any signs that i should replace it asap
  6. Corsair VS series PSUs are low quality units and the worst offered by Corsair. Corsair CS, CX and CXm series are better than VS series but build quality wise, they still are worse than anything offered by Seasonic. While Corsair AX, AXi, HX, HXi, RMx, RMi, TXm and SF series are on-par with Seasonic PSUs.

    Also, there are no obvious signs of PSU dying. When you hear a loud pop from PSU, see some good fireworks coming from your PSU and/or smoke, then you can be sure PSU went sky high. Something like seen in here,
    youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6snWfd1v7M
    2nd, more spectacular video as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vY27LkiEROg

    Different persons have different standards (some have higher standards while others have lower standards) and it's up to every person to decide how good of a build quality components are safe to use in their PC. But keep in mind that PSU is the most important component inside the PC since it powers everything.
    Since i care a lot about all my PCs, i won't put a mediocre quality unit (e.g Corsair CS, CX, CXm) into my PC that fails to meet ATX PSU standards set in place for all OEMs to follow, so that the PSUs are safe to use and doesn't damage other components.
    In fact, i've gone above and beyond regarding PSUs in my PCs. Some may call me nuts that i payed €206.80 for a PSU that sits in my Skylake build (Seasonic SSR-650TD) while i would've been safe with a PSU that costs €69.70 (Seasonic SS-520GM2). While that can be true and i could've saved a lot of money, i feel safe and comfortable that my main PC is powered by the best offered by Seasonic.
    I won't suggest expensive PSU when the budget is way restricted. But i still suggest getting a PSU that at least meets all the ATX PSU standards, even if it's fully wired (like Seasonic SS-520GB).

    Care to give a link to your local store so i can look if there are any other PSUs with equal quality to Seasonic but cheaper? Also, what's your budget?
  7. I live in australia and i don't know any local store which don't seem that sketchy so I order it online and get it shipped
    but here it is https://www.pccasegear.com/
    I would prefer it to be under 100 aud but i'm willing to go up to 165 aud including shipping shipping is about 16 dollars for standard
    here is my build https://au.pcpartpicker.com/user/dav53521/saved/
    How long my psu will last
  8. Since you have GTX 1050 Ti in there which is 75W GPU, Seasonic Focus 450 will do fine in your PC and it costs 99 AUD,
    link: https://www.pccasegear.com/products/41496

    Seasonic Focus is one of the newest PSU lines from Seasonic and it comes with 10 years of OEM warranty. For comparison, your current Corsair VS650 only has 3 years of warranty and i'd be surprised if it actually would last that long. While Seasonic units are tried, tested and proven to be very reliable PSUs. Oh, depending on who you ask, either Seasonic or Super Flower is considered the best PSU OEM in the world.

    Wattage wise and as i said above, GTX 1050 Ti is 75W GPU. Add the rest of the system to it at 200W or so and you're looking 275W as max power your PC can consume, making 450W Seasonic PSU more than enough. You could even upgrade your GPU to GTX 1060 (120W) and still keep your 450W Seasonic unit if you like.
  9. Best answer
    Quote:
    So my psu has a 50 percent chance of killing off my computer

    It's not going to be anywhere remotely close to that high. I think some people here just want to scare people into replacing perfectly functional power supplies. I wouldn't be too concerned about it. It's not like you are running the PSU anywhere near its limits. It might have been reasonable to spend a little more to get a somewhat higher-quality PSU with a better warranty when you built the system, but it's unlikely to be something worth replacing your existing hardware over. The chances of that PSU failing in such a way that it would damage other hardware are probably so low that it's likely not worth spending another $100 on. If it fails, replace it, but I wouldn't bother doing so just to marginally improve the chances of a PSU not damaging your system.

    Aeacus said:
    Seasonic Focus is one of the newest PSU lines from Seasonic and it comes with 10 years of OEM warranty.

    Focus Plus PSUs have a 10 year warranty, while that appears to be a Focus, which have a 7 year warranty.
  10. cryoburner said:
    Quote:
    So my psu has a 50 percent chance of killing off my computer

    It's not going to be anywhere remotely close to that high. I think some people here just want to scare people into replacing perfectly functional power supplies. I wouldn't be too concerned about it. It's not like you are running the PSU anywhere near its limits. It might have been reasonable to spend a little more to get a somewhat higher-quality PSU with a better warranty when you built the system, but it's unlikely to be something worth replacing your existing hardware over. The chances of that PSU failing in such a way that it would damage other hardware are probably so low that it's likely not worth spending another $100 on. If it fails, replace it, but I wouldn't bother doing so just to marginally improve the chances of a PSU not damaging your system.

    Aeacus said:
    Seasonic Focus is one of the newest PSU lines from Seasonic and it comes with 10 years of OEM warranty.

    Focus Plus PSUs have a 10 year warranty, while that appears to be a Focus, which have a 7 year warranty.

    I did state that frying component chances are more of a guidelines than actual rules. And while Corsair VS-series seems to work fine for time being, it's hard to tell if it does provide safe voltages to the rest of the PC or not.

    As far as voltages go, according to the ATX PSU standard, safe voltage ranges are:
    +12V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +11.40V to +12.60V
    +5V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +4.75V to +5.25V
    +3.3V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +3.14V to +3.47V
    -12V DC rail - tolerance ±10% ; -10.80V to -13.20V
    +5V SB rail - tolerance ±5% ; +4.75V to +5.25V

    Anything lower or higher than that aren't safe for PC components. Lower voltage can cause data corruption while higher voltage can fry components.

    It is possible that low quality PSU is feeding too much voltage to the system over the time. While e.g +15V on +12V rail would fry the MoBo voltage control unit/chip on the spot, +13.5V would do gradual damage until MoBo gives in. And MoBo is usually 1st to go when PSU isn't built to the spec. Also, replacing the MoBo is one tedious thing to do since one needs to pull their entire system apart.

    As far as Seasonic Focus warranty length goes, that's my bad. I mixed it up with Seasonic Focus+.
  11. Ill probably buy a new psu next year so i can get a little bit more money
    so i can buy a 650w and get more flexibility with my upgrades
    Is there any way to tell if a part is getting too much voltage?
    and is this one good Seasonic Focus Gold 650W Power Supply because it 30 dollars more
  12. Seasonic Focus 650W is good quality PSU, just like the Seasonic Focus 450W i suggested above. But since it has extra 200W, it's also a bit more expensive.

    To know your voltages, you can use HWinfo64,
    link: https://www.hwinfo.com/download.php

    HWinfo64 is very detailed with logging feature. Besides voltages, it also monitors your temps. Basically every sensor you have in your PC that sends data, HWinfo64 can read it and show it.
  13. So i can use this to see if my power supply is going over the amount of voltage i need
    I wanted to upgrade to a 1060 and thought that wasn't enough flexibility but i looked at it in pc part picker and realised that it was enough ill
    probably start saving towards it after i buy fallout 76
    but if things do get out of hand I do have enough to buy it
  14. Yes, you can use HWinfo64 to monitor your voltages.

    GTX 1060 is 120W GPU, with rest of the system added to it at 200W or so, max would be 320W. For GTX 1060, 450W PSU would do but i'd be more comfortable using 500W range PSU. Getting 600W range PSU would make sense if you're going to get GTX 1070 Ti and above GPU. Or RX 580, which is 185W GPU.
  15. I looked at my power supply box it has a 80 plus white label does that it means it somewhat decent
  16. 80+ certification states PSU efficiency and that doesn't say how good of a build quality PSU is. Also, your 80+ White rating is the lowest of 80+ certifications.

    80+ certifications from best to last:
    80+ Titanium (e.g Seasonic PRIME 80+ Titanium)
    80+ Platinum (e.g Seasonic Platinum)
    80+ Gold (e.g Seasonic Focus+)
    80+ Silver (e.g Seasonic SS-750HT)
    80+ Bronze (e.g Seasonic M12II EVO)
    80+ White (e.g Seasonic M12)

    Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_Plus
  17. Ok
    I have decided I will replace my psu when the warranty of my motherboard and gpu and psu warranty expires or some thing strange happens
Ask a new question