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i need advice about getting the best 850W power supply for my computer

Hi! i just asembled a gaming rig and went to the conclusion that i deffinitely need a fully modular power supply to make it right. was just wondering which ones are the best as a matter of 850W fully modular gold certified PSU's. Thanks for your time!
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More about advice 850w power supply computer
  1. What are your specs? 850W is quite a bit unless your running multiple GPU's...

    As far as which one to get there's quite a few options, a good guide is the PSU Tier which you want a Tier 1/2 as far as quality.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2547993/psu-tier-list.html

    The EVGA G2/G3's are really good.
    Reply to WildCard999
  2. CPU: Intel Core i5-6500 Skylake
    MOTHERBOARD: Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 3
    RAM: 16Gb DDR4 2133MHz, Dual Channel, Kingston Hyper X Fury Black
    GRAPHICS CARD: Gigabyte Geforce GTX 1080 G1 Gaming
    SSD: Samsung SSD 850 EVO, 1TB
    OPTICAL DRIVE: Pioneer DVD-RW DVR-219L
    Wi-Fi ADAPTER: TP-LINK AC600 Archer T2U Wireless Dual Band USB Adapter
    CASE: NZXT S340 Elite
    POWER SUPPLY: XFX 650W, TS Series, Full Wired, 80 Plus Gold Certified
    SPEAKERS: Logitech Z313 with Sub Woofer
    KEYBOARD: Logitech K120
    MOUSE: Diablo 3 by SteelSeries
    OPERATING SYSTEM: Windows 10 Pro, 100% Valid and authentic

    I was planning on putting a second gtx 1080 in there in the future.
    i just built a rig with the NXZT S340 Elite case but my old school power supply ended up me pushing a huge load of unused cables in the PSU area. I want to avoid such messes with a fully modular PSU thats strong enough for the future.
    Reply to maillet
  3. sli GTX1080 needs 750w. 850w is not wrong, it will only use the wattage demanded of it.

    I suggest the Seasonic focus plus.
    Highly rated with a 10 year warranty:
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16817151188
    Reply to geofelt
  4. I went with this one for my build in 2013 https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA4CP1GG2167&cm_re=seasonic_x850-_-9SIA4CP1GG2167-_-Product but the price has increased since. Mine comes with a 7 year warranty and many extra. Seasonic is one of the best rated and doesn't use cheap components.

    I would suggest looking at one of there newer options since they should be cheaper but this PSU will give you a good guide to go by when looking at PSU's. Seasonic also builts many of XFX's PSU's so the quality is still there, usually for a cheaper price.
    Reply to bgunner
  5. You really won't see the difference adding in the 2nd card in MOST games, also as time goes on there will be even less games that will take advantage of SLI/Crossfire setups.

    Single card is the best solution.

    A better way to spend your money would be to move to a newer platform like the Z370 and I7 8700K.
    Reply to jankerson
  6. maillet said:
    CPU: Intel Core i5-6500 Skylake
    MOTHERBOARD: Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 3
    RAM: 16Gb DDR4 2133MHz, Dual Channel, Kingston Hyper X Fury Black
    GRAPHICS CARD: Gigabyte Geforce GTX 1080 G1 Gaming
    SSD: Samsung SSD 850 EVO, 1TB
    OPTICAL DRIVE: Pioneer DVD-RW DVR-219L
    Wi-Fi ADAPTER: TP-LINK AC600 Archer T2U Wireless Dual Band USB Adapter
    CASE: NZXT S340 Elite
    POWER SUPPLY: XFX 650W, TS Series, Full Wired, 80 Plus Gold Certified
    SPEAKERS: Logitech Z313 with Sub Woofer
    KEYBOARD: Logitech K120
    MOUSE: Diablo 3 by SteelSeries
    OPERATING SYSTEM: Windows 10 Pro, 100% Valid and authentic

    I was planning on putting a second gtx 1080 in there in the future.
    i just built a rig with the NXZT S340 Elite case but my old school power supply ended up me pushing a huge load of unused cables in the PSU area. I want to avoid such messes with a fully modular PSU thats strong enough for the future.


    Stick with the single GPU, SLI driver support is pretty poor nowadays and if you want to improve your build I'd get a 7700K as long as your motherboard BIOS is up to date.
    Reply to WildCard999
  7. quite budget friendly! Sounds good about upgrading my CPU. I just want a new fully modular PSU to avoid all the cable mess ive been through with my old school PSU. the Seasonic one is quite a good catch as a matter of budget. So, upgrading my CPU would be a good option? How much difference does it make?
    Reply to maillet
  8. and removing my actual cpu from the motherboard is something ive never tried before. any advices how to make it right?
    Reply to maillet
  9. maillet said:
    quite budget friendly! Sounds good about upgrading my CPU. I just want a new fully modular PSU to avoid all the cable mess ive been through with my old school PSU. the Seasonic one is quite a good catch as a matter of budget. So, upgrading my CPU would be a good option? How much difference does it make?


    There will be a quite a noticeable difference in the i5 6500 and i7 7700K, especially in gaming, and you can OC the i7 7700K.

    Run 3d Mark Fire strike and post the result link for your current system.

    I will post mine as you will have a comparable system to mine after upgrade.
    Reply to jankerson
  10. It's pretty easy, especially with the stock cooler.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cz4vpkfYoII

    If you do decide on the 7700K or something similar like the non K version or 6700(K) you'll want a aftermarket cooler as the stock cooler just doesn't cool good enough.
    Reply to WildCard999
  11. thank you guys! i had my answers. Have a good one and thanks for your time!
    Reply to maillet
  12. If you will upgrade your I5-6500 to a 7th gen processor, you probably need a bios update to support it.
    Do that first.
    Your motherboard will support a processor as good as a I7-7700K.

    To remove a processor, first run your pc a bit to let the cpu get warm. That will soften the thermal paste, making it easy to remove the cooler.
    Next, clean off the old paste using alcohol(92% is very good) and a lint free paper coffee filter.

    When you drop in the new processor, be very careful. Do not smoosh it around to settle it or you will bend the cpu socket pins.

    Likely, you will need a better than stock cooler.
    You have 160mm height available for a cooler.
    $33 buys you a scythe kotetsu:
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13C-0004-00005
    If you buy a i5-7600K or I7-7700K maximum cooling for overclocking can come from a Noctua NH-D15s, about $80
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835608072
    Reply to geofelt
  13. iff i do upgrade the cpu i will stick with the non-K version. overclocking isnt my cup of tea. so you think i will be fine with the stock cooler iff i upgrade with the non - k version?
    Reply to maillet
  14. maillet said:
    iff i do upgrade the cpu i will stick with the non-K version. overclocking isnt my cup of tea. so you think i will be fine with the stock cooler iff i upgrade with the non - k version?


    The non K vers runs quite a bit slower than the K vers even at stock clocks and uses less power so yes.

    However as far as OCing goes it's basically one click in the BIOS CPU upgrade option, you can set the CPU to 4.6 or 4.8 GHz, the I7 7700K should handle that easy if you do decide to get the K vers. Turbo Boost on the K vers is 4.5 GHz out of the box.

    You would need a CPU cooler however like as stated above.
    Reply to jankerson
  15. I'm pretty sure with either 7700 or 7700K your going to want something better then the stock, at the very least the Cryorig H7.
    Reply to WildCard999
  16. WildCard999 said:
    I'm pretty sure with either 7700 or 7700K your going to want something better then the stock, at the very least the Cryorig H7.


    Ideally yeah, for sure.
    Reply to jankerson
  17. hey about the 3d Mark test. i scored 14572 with G-Sinc disabled.
    Reply to maillet
  18. do you think that Cryorig H7 Tower Cooler will come with pre applied thermal paste like the stock cooler does?
    Reply to maillet
  19. maillet said:
    hey about the 3d Mark test. i scored 14572 with G-Sinc disabled.


    Here is mine.

    https://www.3dmark.com/fs/14817629

    CPU at 4.8 GHz, GPU stock speed.
    Reply to jankerson
  20. maillet said:
    do you think that Cryorig H7 Tower Cooler will come with pre applied thermal paste like the stock cooler does?


    It does but it wouldn't hurt to have a small tube of MX4 just in case the first time mounting it doesn't exactly go as planned.
    Reply to WildCard999
  21. maillet said:
    do you think that Cryorig H7 Tower Cooler will come with pre applied thermal paste like the stock cooler does?


    Every oem cooler including the H7 will come with a tube of paste.
    Only intel comes with pre-applied so far as I know.

    Even if you will not overclock, the 7700K will run faster at stock.
    Overclocking is a bit of a misnomer.
    It is as simple as changing a bios setting from the default of, say 35 to 40 leaving all else on auto.
    Reply to geofelt
  22. damn homie that 3d mark thing is pretty conclusive. i didnt imagine a change of cpu could do as much difference due to the fact that i own a i5 skylake.
    Reply to maillet
  23. one last question. how much of that paste are you supposed to apply on the cpu before you mount that cooler?
    Reply to maillet
  24. maillet said:
    damn homie that 3d mark thing is pretty conclusive. i didnt imagine a change of cpu could do as much difference due to the fact that i own a i5 skylake.


    Difference in i5 to I7 and large CPU clock difference along with I have faster Ram DDR4 3000.
    Reply to jankerson
  25. If you need to put paste on the CPU you only want to use about a grain of rice.
    Reply to WildCard999
  26. a grain of rice at the middle and thats it?
    Reply to maillet
  27. There's different application methods but I use about a grain of rice amount then spread it evenly over the entire CPU with a old credit card, this method may not be the most used one out there but has worked flawlessly for me for years.

    The lines method – Place two thin lines of thermal compound on the base of the cooler. The lines should be parallel and spaced so that they are each placed a third of the width of the processor. The lines themselves should also be about a third of the processor’s width in length.
    The cross method – This is very similar to the previous method, but the lines are crossed in an “X” pattern instead of parallel. The length and thickness of the lines should be the same as the previous method.
    The spread method – This is one of the most popular and effective methods, but takes a little more effort. Place a small amount of thermal paste onto the base of the cooler. Using a plastic finger protector or a plastic bag, use your finger to spread the paste evenly across the surface. Make sure to cover the entire surface that will be in contact with the processor, and ensure that you do not apply the paste too thick. In most cases, the paste should barely hide the metal underneath.

    Source: https://www.wikihow.com/Apply-Thermal-Paste
    Reply to WildCard999
  28. what iff i only let it spread by itself by applying pressure from mounting the heatsink directly. what would be the right method?
    Reply to maillet
  29. maillet said:
    what iff i only let it spread by itself by applying pressure from mounting the heatsink directly. what would be the right method?


    It could work fine, just keep an eye on your temps.
    Reply to WildCard999
  30. Best answer
    maillet said:
    what iff i only let it spread by itself by applying pressure from mounting the heatsink directly. what would be the right method?


    Just apply it in the middle and mount the heat sink, it will spread automatically.
    Reply to jankerson
  31. ok i'm done with my questions, thanks for your time guys! Have a good one!
    Reply to maillet
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