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Inquiring about Ryzen vs. Kaby Lake for multitasking

I do a ton of multitasking on my computer, and I wanted to see if someone could break this down for me. Is having a higher core and thread count better for multitasking/non gaming workloads? I'm a moderate gamer so I don't feel I need a high end intel cpu for gaming advantages. I've had my eye on the Ryzen 7 1700x as a new processor for myself. My workloads include: content editing, video/audio encoding, straddling up to six programs at once, etc. Is having more cores better for my work than the quad core kaby lake i5 I have?
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More about inquiring ryzen kaby lake multitasking
  1. Yes, the ryzen 1700x will be able to outperformed your i5 very easily when it comes to those categories, for multithreaded tasks you will want more threads, 16 threads vs your i5s 4 threads, the ryzen will preform a lot better, if your wanting a cpu for multitasking than the 1700x will give you more than you need, although if you want to overclock than get the 1700, the 1700x has technology that boost it up 100 mhz higher than the 1700, which makes the 1700x a little harder to overclock, that is LITERALLY the only difference between the 1700x and the 1700 so you can save yourself a lot of money if you stick with the 1700, if you wasn't to overclock it make sure you get a decent cooler
  2. connerweatherly17 said:
    Yes, the ryzen 1700x will be able to outperformed your i5 very easily when it comes to those categories, for multithreaded tasks you will want more threads, 16 threads vs your i5s 4 threads, the ryzen will preform a lot better, if your wanting a cpu for multitasking than the 1700x will give you more than you need, although if you want to overclock than get the 1700, the 1700x has technology that boost it up 100 mhz higher than the 1700, which makes the 1700x a little harder to overclock, that is LITERALLY the only difference between the 1700x and the 1700 so you can save yourself a lot of money if you stick with the 1700, if you wasn't to overclock it make sure you get a decent cooler


    Well, right now I have a Corsair H60 Cooler (Wasnt made for my current cpu, but i made it work somehow lol) and it's been an absolute trooper. Also I appreciate the advice about the 1700, since I am going to be overclocking. Ill probably go with that one then, and then ill have a cpu that is actually supported by my cooler haha.
  3. wvanis0 said:
    I do a ton of multitasking on my computer, and I wanted to see if someone could break this down for me. Is having a higher core and thread count better for multitasking/non gaming workloads? I'm a moderate gamer so I don't feel I need a high end intel cpu for gaming advantages. I've had my eye on the Ryzen 7 1700x as a new processor for myself. My workloads include: content editing, video/audio encoding, straddling up to six programs at once, etc. Is having more cores better for my work than the quad core kaby lake i5 I have?


    Possibly. If you watch the task manager while you are doing these things and are seeing 100% or near 100% cpu utilization then this is a definite yes. So much of what you do especially the video/audio encoding is program specific and how threaded that program is coded. If more cores would help is going to very specific in your case not so much a generic question answer. Also Ryzen and Intel trade blows depending on the encoder used.

    I would look at the latest CPU reviews like these on the 8700K as it has Ryzen in there as well. If you don't see what you are using for video/audio encoding maybee search for Intel 8700K review plus your programs name. I'm pointing you at the encoding as that sounds like the heavy hitter in your list.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-coffee-lake-i7-8700k-cpu,5252-9.html
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/11859/the-anandtech-coffee-lake-review-8700k-and-8400-initial-numbers/10
  4. JamesSneed said:
    wvanis0 said:
    I do a ton of multitasking on my computer, and I wanted to see if someone could break this down for me. Is having a higher core and thread count better for multitasking/non gaming workloads? I'm a moderate gamer so I don't feel I need a high end intel cpu for gaming advantages. I've had my eye on the Ryzen 7 1700x as a new processor for myself. My workloads include: content editing, video/audio encoding, straddling up to six programs at once, etc. Is having more cores better for my work than the quad core kaby lake i5 I have?


    Possibly. If you watch the task manager while you are doing these things and are seeing 100% or near 100% cpu utilization then this is a definite yes. So much of what you do especially the video/audio encoding is program specific and how threaded that program is coded. If more cores would help is going to very specific in your case not so much a generic question answer. Also Ryzen and Intel trade blows depending on the encoder used.

    I would look at the latest CPU reviews like these on the 8700K as it has Ryzen in there as well. If you don't see what you are using for video/audio encoding maybee search for Intel 8700K review plus your programs name. I'm pointing you at the encoding as that sounds like the heavy hitter in your list.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-coffee-lake-i7-8700k-cpu,5252-9.html
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/11859/the-anandtech-coffee-lake-review-8700k-and-8400-initial-numbers/10


    I typically use handbrake for encoding. I have definately taken a look at the 8700k, and it really does seem like a dream processor for me, but I'm also looking to spare some money if I can, since the 8700k is pretty high
  5. Well if the 8700K isn't out of budget entirely I would think about it. Handbrake just loves that CPU. The Ryzen 1800x is right at 20% slower than the 8700K at 4k encoding using handbrake. The Ryzen 1700 if you can get a good stable OC to 3.8-3.9 Ghz is also darn good and won't be far off the 8700K stock.

    Here is a handbrake chart so you can get an idea of price vs performance:
    https://www.anandtech.com/bench/CPU/2002
  6. Best answer
    Stock for stock, the i7 8700K has about 20% less multithread performance, but 20% more single thread performance than the 1800X, from what i observe.

    The 1700X is probably every bit as good in overclocking as the 1800X, and if you are lucky you may even hit 4.15 GHz on all cores, setting it as fast as a stock i7 6950X! That is very rare however, but even then 3.9-4.0 GHz will still be plenty fast.

    For your case in multi-tasking, multi-core performance is more important. Get the 1700X, it is like a stock i7 5960X with C states disabled.

    6 programs run better on 6+ cores than 4. However, for general use, the i7 8700K is better as programs also benefit from single thread.

    Both CPUs are plenty fast anyways. Get which one you prefer.
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