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XMP or "Auto" ram oc help.

Since I got my PC I was running my ram at 2800Mhz on the XMP 2.0 profile (Stock is 2400mhz)
On the XMP profile, I could not go above 2800mhz, instant bluescreen.
I have the Ballistix Sport LT 8GB DDR4 2400 MT/s
I decided to see what happens when I turn on "Auto" instead of Xmp 2.0.
Now I have my ram at 3000mhz and I want to go higher but make sure its safe. Will there be an increase in performance? Especially stuttering. Will it decrease the life of my ram?
Is "Auto" different from XMP?
Here is some more info about my system: i5 7600k @4.9ghz , Asrock z170 extreme 4 mobo
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about xmp auto ram
  1. XMP is picking out stored values in the memory. Auto I assume is a feature of your board that tries many configurations until it finds something stable. Otherwise it would just default to the normal memory profile.

    I would be curious as to what timings it picked. Generally low CAS is better than absolute bandwidth for things like gaming.

    Voltage is also a concern. Don't really want to exceed 1.35 typically. I run my kit at 1.15 as I recall.
  2. Eximo said:
    XMP is picking out stored values in the memory. Auto I assume is a feature of your board that tries many configurations until it finds something stable. Otherwise it would just default to the normal memory profile.

    I would be curious as to what timings it picked. Generally low CAS is better than absolute bandwidth for things like gaming.

    Voltage is also a concern. Don't really want to exceed 1.35 typically. I run my kit at 1.15 as I recall.


    I dont really understand the CAS, is there a thread somewhere I can see? Is there a specific pattern like in cpu overclocking?
  3. Best answer
    RAM overclocking isn't a subject I put a lot of time in myself. I simply buy the speed I want it to go. I don't like the idea of the higher voltage through the memory controller on the CPU, so I have been sticking to memories that stay at the recommended voltage.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAS_latency

    http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/memory-performance-speed-latency

    Here are two I commonly reference for these types of questions.

    CAS 15 at 3000Mhz is typically better than CAS 18 at 3200 Mhz and things like that. Though if the goal is heavy calculation, then pure bandwidth can be beneficial.
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