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1070ti core voltage

It appears the 1070ti is voltage locked,so can I safely apply +100% on core voltage? Thx
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  1. Best answer
    You just contradicted yourself. So to answer your question, it doesn't matter. Slide that slider anyway you want it is not going to change the behavior of the card whatsoever.
  2. From what i've seen so far, on my Asus 1070ti, is that increasing the voltage slider doesn't do anything until the core requires more voltage to stay stable.
  3. TechyInAZ said:
    You just contradicted yourself. So to answer your question, it doesn't matter. Slide that slider anyway you want it is not going to change the behavior of the card whatsoever.


    This is patently false. Core voltage matters a great deal on the Pascal architecture. So much so, in fact, that increasing voltage while overclocking, if temps get too warm, can cause instability. The Pascal cores are extremely sensitive to temperatures.

    So while it's true that the voltage is "locked" on Pascal GPUs, boost 3.0 will usually keep the GPU from running the maximum voltage. That limitation is set at 1.093v. What you'll likely normally see for voltage on stock settings, is most likely around 1.07v or less.

    For instance. On air, a GPU may be able to boost itself to say 2100, but will only need 1.053v to get there. As core temps increase, it'll need more voltage to hold that same clock. Likewise, as core temps decrease, less voltage will be required to keep that clock stable. There are limits, obviously, there's a curve, so to speak there where the GPU will work efficiently. All based around core temp, which effects the voltage required to keep a specific clock stable.

    It's possible to skip around these limitations, but only slightly, by using the voltage / frequency curve to overclock, instead of using the offset method.

    An example of the voltage / frequency curve method of overclocking.

  4. Vellinious said:
    TechyInAZ said:
    You just contradicted yourself. So to answer your question, it doesn't matter. Slide that slider anyway you want it is not going to change the behavior of the card whatsoever.


    This is patently false. Core voltage matters a great deal on the Pascal architecture. So much so, in fact, that increasing voltage while overclocking, if temps get too warm, can cause instability. The Pascal cores are extremely sensitive to temperatures.

    So while it's true that the voltage is "locked" on Pascal GPUs, boost 3.0 will usually keep the GPU from running the maximum voltage. That limitation is set at 1.093v. What you'll likely normally see for voltage on stock settings, is most likely around 1.07v or less.

    For instance. On air, a GPU may be able to boost itself to say 2100, but will only need 1.053v to get there. As core temps increase, it'll need more voltage to hold that same clock. Likewise, as core temps decrease, less voltage will be required to keep that clock stable. There are limits, obviously, there's a curve, so to speak there where the GPU will work efficiently. All based around core temp, which effects the voltage required to keep a specific clock stable.

    It's possible to skip around these limitations, but only slightly, by using the voltage / frequency curve to overclock, instead of using the offset method.

    An example of the voltage / frequency curve method of overclocking.




    I couldn't understand what exactly you are trying to say. Just that core voltage really affects the overclock in this case? When using 100% core voltage, I can get to 2101 core clock and 4450 memory clock, temps reaching 67ºC, but really didnt try without increasing core voltage.
  5. vitorsfln said:
    Vellinious said:
    TechyInAZ said:
    You just contradicted yourself. So to answer your question, it doesn't matter. Slide that slider anyway you want it is not going to change the behavior of the card whatsoever.


    This is patently false. Core voltage matters a great deal on the Pascal architecture. So much so, in fact, that increasing voltage while overclocking, if temps get too warm, can cause instability. The Pascal cores are extremely sensitive to temperatures.

    So while it's true that the voltage is "locked" on Pascal GPUs, boost 3.0 will usually keep the GPU from running the maximum voltage. That limitation is set at 1.093v. What you'll likely normally see for voltage on stock settings, is most likely around 1.07v or less.

    For instance. On air, a GPU may be able to boost itself to say 2100, but will only need 1.053v to get there. As core temps increase, it'll need more voltage to hold that same clock. Likewise, as core temps decrease, less voltage will be required to keep that clock stable. There are limits, obviously, there's a curve, so to speak there where the GPU will work efficiently. All based around core temp, which effects the voltage required to keep a specific clock stable.

    It's possible to skip around these limitations, but only slightly, by using the voltage / frequency curve to overclock, instead of using the offset method.

    An example of the voltage / frequency curve method of overclocking.




    I couldn't understand what exactly you are trying to say. Just that core voltage really affects the overclock in this case? When using 100% core voltage, I can get to 2101 core clock and 4450 memory clock, temps reaching 67ºC, but really didnt try without increasing core voltage.


    Using the frequency / voltage curve, you can assign that clock at a slightly lower voltage than the stock max of 1.093v. It may work, but at 67c core temp, you're probably not going to be able to drop the voltage by much, if at all. Every GPU is a little bit different....you'll just have to try it and see what happens.

    The cooler the core temp, the less voltage it will take to keep a specific clock stable.
  6. Vellinious said:
    TechyInAZ said:
    You just contradicted yourself. So to answer your question, it doesn't matter. Slide that slider anyway you want it is not going to change the behavior of the card whatsoever.


    This is patently false. Core voltage matters a great deal on the Pascal architecture. So much so, in fact, that increasing voltage while overclocking, if temps get too warm, can cause instability. The Pascal cores are extremely sensitive to temperatures.

    So while it's true that the voltage is "locked" on Pascal GPUs, boost 3.0 will usually keep the GPU from running the maximum voltage. That limitation is set at 1.093v. What you'll likely normally see for voltage on stock settings, is most likely around 1.07v or less.

    For instance. On air, a GPU may be able to boost itself to say 2100, but will only need 1.053v to get there. As core temps increase, it'll need more voltage to hold that same clock. Likewise, as core temps decrease, less voltage will be required to keep that clock stable. There are limits, obviously, there's a curve, so to speak there where the GPU will work efficiently. All based around core temp, which effects the voltage required to keep a specific clock stable.

    It's possible to skip around these limitations, but only slightly, by using the voltage / frequency curve to overclock, instead of using the offset method.



    I think you misunderstood me, Nvidia specifically LOCKED the voltage on ALL GTX 1070 Tis. The normal 1070, 1080, 1060, 1080 Ti etc all have the ability to adjust their voltages thru overclocking software..
  7. TechyInAZ said:
    Vellinious said:
    TechyInAZ said:
    You just contradicted yourself. So to answer your question, it doesn't matter. Slide that slider anyway you want it is not going to change the behavior of the card whatsoever.


    This is patently false. Core voltage matters a great deal on the Pascal architecture. So much so, in fact, that increasing voltage while overclocking, if temps get too warm, can cause instability. The Pascal cores are extremely sensitive to temperatures.

    So while it's true that the voltage is "locked" on Pascal GPUs, boost 3.0 will usually keep the GPU from running the maximum voltage. That limitation is set at 1.093v. What you'll likely normally see for voltage on stock settings, is most likely around 1.07v or less.

    For instance. On air, a GPU may be able to boost itself to say 2100, but will only need 1.053v to get there. As core temps increase, it'll need more voltage to hold that same clock. Likewise, as core temps decrease, less voltage will be required to keep that clock stable. There are limits, obviously, there's a curve, so to speak there where the GPU will work efficiently. All based around core temp, which effects the voltage required to keep a specific clock stable.

    It's possible to skip around these limitations, but only slightly, by using the voltage / frequency curve to overclock, instead of using the offset method.



    I think you misunderstood me, Nvidia specifically LOCKED the voltage on ALL GTX 1070 Tis. The normal 1070, 1080, 1060, 1080 Ti etc all have the ability to adjust their voltages thru overclocking software..


    The voltage is locked to a maximum of 1.093v on all Pascal GPUs. Boost 3.0 regulates that voltage by clock speed and core temp. You can get around boost 3.0 somewhat, but using the voltage / frequency curve, but you'll never get more than the 1.093v max. I've seen one review where the reviewer could only get the GPU to run at 1.06v, but I think that's more of a limitation due to heat, using offsets for overclocking, core clock he was testing at, and boost 3.0 doing it's thing, because I've personally seen, on a reference board with water cooling, the GPU hit the 1.093v max with the use of the frequency / voltage curve.

    It's all about the core temps.
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