Can't OC i7 2600k past 4.4 ghz

I'm trying to OC my i7 2600k similar to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUOtTEMn-RU&t=896s">Gamers Nexus</a> with the goal of around 4.7 ghz to try get it on pair with something like a modern i5. I can't push the sucker past 4.4 ghz without freezing and blue screening and at this clock a 1.4v VCore is needed to maintain constant system sustainability. CPU temps are fine with a maximum temperature of 62 C when gaming and stress testing thanks to the corsair H115i 280mm Extreme Performance Liquid Cooler. It's just some would consider 1.4v a bit on the high end for VCore. I want this CPU to last, so is 1.4v Vcore too much in my case? Also have I lost out on the silicon lottery or is it just my Motherboard limiting me?

I have disabled the following settings in bios:
•C1E
•EIST
•C3, C6 States
•CPU Thermal Monitor

From what I've read from the online sandy bridge overclocking guides, disabling Turbo Mode doesn't help improve system stability so I haven't bothered to disable it.

**PC SPECS**

Processor: Intel Core i7-2600k

CPU Cooler: corsair H115i 280mm Extreme Performance Liquid Cooler

Graphics: GTX 1060 MSI Gaming X 6G Edition

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD3-B3

Ram: 16GB DDR3

Power supply: AX860 860 watt 80 plus platinum Certified Fully Modular PSU

Software: Windows 10
8 answers Last reply
More about 2600k past ghz
  1. some you can, some you can't, probably less likely to be able to after 6 years. Personally overclock in first few months or don't bother, there is risk, if your OC killed your mobo today as you are experimenting with it, you'll find it tricky to replace.
  2. 13thmonkey said:
    some you can, some you can't, probably less likely to be able to after 6 years. Personally overclock in first few months or don't bother, there is risk, if your OC killed your mobo today as you are experimenting with it, you'll find it tricky to replace.


    No matter the situation, there is always a risk. The same applies with overclocking. I followed the online sandy bridge overclocking guides which recommended not to go past 1.45v VCore. So the risk of hardware loss would of been quite low. The question is 1.4v VCore sustainable for say another 2 years?

    Many people such as gamer nexus recommend overclocking these older chips to keep them in line with the newer CPU's when it comes to gaming.
  3. my personal preference. 1.4v is too much as manual vcore. and i dont like disabling or messing with C-states.
    if you had a much more better motherboard for OC, then you can rely on RAM BCLK to give you around max +1.5Ghz on your CPU.
    not all CPUs+motherboard+RAM+CPU Cooler+Thermal Paste are the same. so dont fret if you cant reach the same numbers as the next dude.
  4. I wouldn't go to 1.4, from memory my 3570k is a lot lower than that. .
  5. marksavio said:
    my personal preference. 1.4v is too much as manual vcore. and i dont like disabling or messing with C-states.
    if you had a much more better motherboard for OC, then you can rely on RAM BCLK to give you around max +1.5Ghz on your CPU.
    not all CPUs+motherboard+RAM+CPU Cooler+Thermal Paste are the same. so dont fret if you cant reach the same numbers as the next dude.


    BCLK is old school overclocking and harder to get stable. However I can use it to fine tune clock down to 4th decimal place.

    13thmonkey said:
    I wouldn't go to 1.4, from memory my 3570k is a lot lower than that. .


    I can OC to 4.2 ghz without touching the voltage.
  6. OK, Playing around with Vtt (increased to 1.08V), CPU PLL (decreased to 1.72 V), System agent voltage (increased to 0.965V) and PCH Core (1.05V default) seemed to not improve stability at all. However enabling a voltage setting called "Load-line calibration" allowed me to push the OC to a stable 4.5 GHz with 1.42 Vcore. Adding more Vcore with or without the extra voltage settings to achieve a higher overclock results in system instability. There is another voltage setting called "Multi-step Load-line" with like 10 presets. Haven't bothered to play around with this one yet and don't know with which preset to start.
  7. Like everyone has said not every architecture has the same safe recommended Vcore. In general it is not recommended to go past 1.4V Vcore.

    However, it also varies chip by chip. For example, I had a 6700k which I was able to get to 4.7GHz, however, silicon lottery numbers reported that only about 50% (maybe less I can't quite remember) were able to even get over 4.6GHz. Meaning the worst of them were only able to achieve about 4.5GHz even at 1.4V.
    Another example is the 8700k. Some people are reporting as high as 5.3GHz on air coolers with the 8700k. Tom's own review was only able to get it to 4.9GHz stable, and I think Silicon Lottery has that chip at 50% being able to hit 5.0GHz.

    So don't be too concerned about other people getting higher clock speeds, you may have just gotten a chip that doesn't OC quite as well as others.

    I definitely wouldn't go over 1.4V.
  8. EpIckFa1LJoN said:
    Like everyone has said not every architecture has the same safe recommended Vcore. In general it is not recommended to go past 1.4V Vcore.

    However, it also varies chip by chip. For example, I had a 6700k which I was able to get to 4.7GHz, however, silicon lottery numbers reported that only about 50% (maybe less I can't quite remember) were able to even get over 4.6GHz. Meaning the worst of them were only able to achieve about 4.5GHz even at 1.4V.
    Another example is the 8700k. Some people are reporting as high as 5.3GHz on air coolers with the 8700k. Tom's own review was only able to get it to 4.9GHz stable, and I think Silicon Lottery has that chip at 50% being able to hit 5.0GHz.

    So don't be too concerned about other people getting higher clock speeds, you may have just gotten a chip that doesn't OC quite as well as others.

    I definitely wouldn't go over 1.4V.


    That is skylake processor, this is sandy bridge and they need more juice typically beyond 1.3v for higher overclocks.

    OK so setting Multi-step Load-line levels to preset 4 allowed me to drop my Vcore down to 1.365 V and maintain my 4.5 GHz overclock stable.

    LLC prevents Vroop (drop in voltage) at the onset of CPU load and helps with stabilizing the CPU during overclocks under load.

    LLC 5 is optimal for maintaining voltage at a fairly consistent state. LLC 1 allows more Vdroop and LLC 7 less. LLC 1 will run cooler as it's not compensating as much for voltage, therefor average Vcore during load is lower. LLC 7 is the opposite where average Vcore will often exceed the user defined amount.

    On average, at LLC 7, the board will overshoot user defined voltage and at LLC 1 it will come up low. LLC 5 would result in average Vcore matching closest to your defined value.

    CPUID is reporting my Vcore as varying between 1.38V - 1.392V when idling and 1.368V - 1.38V when under load with these settings enabled. vdroop only kicks in when the CPU is under load and that's what's responsible for the voltage drop.

    https://forum.giga-byte.co.uk/index.php?topic=7760.0
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