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Gaming at 1080p 144hz, Ryzen 5 1600 or Intel i5 7600k?

I'm coming from a i5 4440, and I want something that doesn't bottleneck my GPU (1070) and leaves me with a good upgrade path. Obviously this means I have to get a new motherboard and RAM, so I want to make this choice wisely. I've heard that the the i5 actually beats Ryzen in gaming benchmarks, but is it anything to scoff at?
I may do the occasional stream, but extremely rarely, so I don't see it as an important factor, but it's always a bonus if I can stream at 720p 60fps without any noticeable frame drops.

EDIT: I should mention I'm on a semi-tight budget. I would prefer not to spend more then maybe $80 on a new motherboard and max of $220 on a CPU.
Reply to Christopher Aubert
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about gaming 1080p 144hz ryzen 1600 intel 7600k
  1. It all comes down to how many threads you need.
    Your i5-4400 has 4 threads.
    Most games can actually only make good use of 2-3 threads.
    If your use is pure gaming and not multitasking, 4 should be enough.
    If your games are multiplayer, they can usually make good use of more threads
    Your I5-4440 has a passmark rating of 6472 when all 4 cores are fully utilized, and 1877 for more single threaded games.
    ryzen 1600 has 12 threads and a rating of 12337, but the single thread rating is about what you have now at 1832.
    The I5-7600K has 4 threads and a rating of 9180 and a single thread rating of 2386.
    Both the 1600 and the 7600K can be overclocked by perhaps 20%

    You might consider a I7-4790K, even if you need to run at stock.
    It has 8 threads, and a rating of 11190/2530.

    All of the options above should do what you want, namely run a GTX1070 well.

    If you are going to change motherboard and ram, I would opt for a I-8600K and a Z370 motherboard.
    I5-8600K has 6 threads and a rating of 12381 and a single thread rating of 2531.
    It is a great overclocker with some 84% of samples able to reach 5.0.
    Reply to geofelt
  2. If you consider 7600K, think about 8th gen i5 8400 or 8600K or go i7 8700K
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-cpus,3986.html
    Reply to Bob125484
  3. Get the i3-8350K rather than the i5-7600K. They are essentially the exact same CPU with the same performance and overclocking but the i3-8350K costs less.

    As for gaming the i3-8350k will beat the Ryzen in most games. Those which are well optimized for multiple threads tend to do better on the Ryzen. There aren't many which meet that criteria. They are increasing in number and will likely continue to do so.

    In terms of live streaming the Ryzen is the better choice.

    Another option you don't mention is the i5-8400. True you can't overclock. In terms of gaming performance it soundly outperforms the Ryzen 1600 with a max overclock. There are a few where it gets very close or the Ryzen gets a slight lead. For the most part the i5-8400 has a sound victory. It also beats the Ryzen in nearly every non-gaming benchmark except a few heavily multi-threaded workstation tasks.

    As with the Ryzen. The an overclocked i3-8350K beats the i5-8400 in most games. Except in those optimized for six or more threads. Then the i5-8400 takes the lead. Same with other software.

    They each have their strong points. I think the i5-8400 is the most practical. The i3-8350K and Ryzen 1600 have to use screaming hot overclocks to compete with the i5-8400. You need more expensive motherboards with good power handling to handle those overclocks. They use a lot more power and you have to dump all that heat. The 8400 offers a good balance of single threaded and multi-threaded performance. As long as your cooling is adequate it will turboboost reliably between 4Ghz for one core and 3.8Ghz for six cores.
    Reply to velocityg4
  4. geofelt said:
    It all comes down to how many threads you need.
    Your i5-4400 has 4 threads.
    Most games can actually only make good use of 2-3 threads.
    If your use is pure gaming and not multitasking, 4 should be enough.
    If your games are multiplayer, they can usually make good use of more threads
    Your I5-4440 has a passmark rating of 6472 when all 4 cores are fully utilized, and 1877 for more single threaded games.
    ryzen 1600 has 12 threads and a rating of 12337, but the single thread rating is about what you have now at 1832.
    The I5-7600K has 4 threads and a rating of 9180 and a single thread rating of 2386.
    Both the 1600 and the 7600K can be overclocked by perhaps 20%

    You might consider a I7-4790K, even if you need to run at stock.
    It has 8 threads, and a rating of 11190/2530.

    All of the options above should do what you want, namely run a GTX1070 well.

    If you are going to change motherboard and ram, I would opt for a I-8600K and a Z370 motherboard.
    I5-8600K has 6 threads and a rating of 12381 and a single thread rating of 2531.
    It is a great overclocker with some 84% of samples able to reach 5.0.


    Hmm. I suppose I should of mentioned a budget. I was hoping to pay no more then maybe $220 for the CPU, and while I would spring for the i5 8400 in this case (once it becomes in stock), the fact of the matter is that Z370 motherboards are quite expensive, starting at $130 with tons of features I just will never use/need, so I'm afraid that 8th gen Intel is out of the question. Also... I should of mentioned that I don't plan to overclock because I don't have the appropriate coolers and since I'm predominately going to use this for gaming, overclocking does very little for fps numbers.
    With that said Ryzen's B350M chipset has been attracting me with M.2 slots, plenty of PCI lanes, and plenty of I/O features all in MicroATX form factors for only $60-80.

    What about what you said would change if I was on a semi-tight budget?
    Reply to Christopher Aubert
  5. velocityg4 said:
    Get the i3-8350K rather than the i5-7600K. They are essentially the exact same CPU with the same performance and overclocking but the i3-8350K costs less.

    As for gaming the i3-8350k will beat the Ryzen in most games. Those which are well optimized for multiple threads tend to do better on the Ryzen. There aren't many which meet that criteria. They are increasing in number and will likely continue to do so.

    In terms of live streaming the Ryzen is the better choice.

    Another option you don't mention is the i5-8400. True you can't overclock. In terms of gaming performance it soundly outperforms the Ryzen 1600 with a max overclock. There are a few where it gets very close or the Ryzen gets a slight lead. For the most part the i5-8400 has a sound victory. It also beats the Ryzen in nearly every non-gaming benchmark except a few heavily multi-threaded workstation tasks.

    As with the Ryzen. The an overclocked i3-8350K beats the i5-8400 in most games. Except in those optimized for six or more threads. Then the i5-8400 takes the lead. Same with other software.

    They each have their strong points. I think the i5-8400 is the most practical. The i3-8350K and Ryzen 1600 have to use screaming hot overclocks to compete with the i5-8400. You need more expensive motherboards with good power handling to handle those overclocks. They use a lot more power and you have to dump all that heat. The 8400 offers a good balance of single threaded and multi-threaded performance. As long as your cooling is adequate it will turboboost reliably between 4Ghz for one core and 3.8Ghz for six cores.

    While I agree with the i5 8400 being the most practical, I'm on a bit of a budget (which I forgot to mention in the original post, sorry) and the Z370 motherboards start at $130 which for me is just out of the question. What about what you said would change since I see the i5 8400's motherboard chipset, and in turn, the CPU itself, as not economically possible?
    Reply to Christopher Aubert
  6. ASROCK has a well reviewed Z370 motherboard selling for $110(after a $10 rebate)

    You can put any 8th gen processor on it that you might want.
    I like the I3-8350K quad for $190.
    I would buy a $35 scythe kotetsu cooler. It will be quieter and more efficient than any stock cooler.
    Here is a review:
    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1391-page1.html
    Intel, unlike ryzen is not picky about ram. You can do well with the cheapest DDR4 ram kit you can find.

    If your main gaming is multiplayer, then there is a good case for ryzen with many cheap threads.
    Other games like mmo, strategy and sims tend to be single threaded and cpu limited

    Fast action shooters depend more on the graphics card.

    The K chips are designed to have their multiplier raised. (this is technically not overclocking)
    How well you do is determined by your luck in getting a good chip.
    The process for a conservative OC is as simple as changing the bios multiplier to what you want.
    You can get some idea from these stats:
    as of 10/16/2017
    What % of I3-8350K chips can oc
    at a agressive vcore of 1.4 and delidded
    4.8 96%
    4.9 82%
    5.0 50%
    5.1 27%
    5.2 14%

    The whole ryzen line tops out near 4.0 and the efficiency per clock is a bit less too.
    If you may ultimately want to run a card like a GTX1080ti, you will need some serious core speed to drive it.

    My thought is that it is penny wise and pound foolish to go cheap on the processor.

    If you can't handle a 8th gen intel upgrade, buy a used I7-4790K; it will go for about $250 on ebay.
    Reply to geofelt
  7. go Ryzen next gen what i am waiting for in the next few months. You can pick a motherboard & if you find a better cpu not limited to socket type. Consider the chipset. You want ability to OC but dont need to & when picking ram do your study & pick ram where if you can get away with a Bios update no issues. Ryzen is a good option & they are only going to get better with price & preformance. Am an Itel user but not biased on brands but going AMD. Using a Sapphire pulse RX560 4G i picked up on boxing day sales here in NZ. Was prety I'mpressed for what i am using it for.Be open minded AMD fills the gap nicely if you dont have the $ for Nvidia & Intel & there support not as open where AMD do once they come back from New Years.
    Reply to Plumboby
  8. The 7600K might have a small lead in quite a few games, but, I'd fight hard for the 8600K, or, just go 7700K if you can get one on sale...

    4c/4t is nearly dead.....
    Reply to mdd1963
  9. Best answer
    Christopher Aubert said:
    =
    While I agree with the i5 8400 being the most practical, I'm on a bit of a budget (which I forgot to mention in the original post, sorry) and the Z370 motherboards start at $130 which for me is just out of the question. What about what you said would change since I see the i5 8400's motherboard chipset, and in turn, the CPU itself, as not economically possible?


    Based on your added budget of $300 total. Plus your disinterest in overclocking. I'd say the Ryzen 5 1600 is the best option.

    If you can go a little higher. You can get a Ryzen 1600x for about $315. It requires an aftermarket cooler.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600X 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($224.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($29.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - AB350M Pro4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($60.98 @ Newegg)
    Total: $315.86
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-01-03 09:33 EST-0500

    If you can possibly wrangle your budget up to $330. I'll just leave this i5-8400 combo for you to mull over.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($209.88 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - Z370 Killer SLI/ac ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $329.87
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-01-03 09:15 EST-0500
    Reply to velocityg4
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