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RX 580 Overcloking potential help

Hello!
So i've recently bought a Gigabyte Aorus RX 580 8GB and i would like to try and give it a shot at overclocking this bad boy!
Can you guys help me a give me some safe numbers (and maybe a fan curve to go with that) not that big, but big enough to see a difference in games, i don't really know how much i can set it to.
For now the temps in idle (30 with fans active and 44 with fans at semi passive in idle and 68-72 in games).
Thank you in advance!

Full specs:
RX 580 Aorus 8GB
FX 8350 4.0
HyperX Blu 8GB (2X4) 1333mhz
Asus M5A97 R2.0
Corsair CX 600
WD Caviar Black 1TB and WD Caviar Blue 1TB
Reply to ezioxtz
4 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 580 overcloking potential
  1. Every GPU overclocks differently. You just incrementally push it higher until you get artifacts or crashes, and then revert back to the last stable point.
    Reply to TJ Hooker
  2. TJ Hooker said:
    Every GPU overclocks differently. You just incrementally push it higher until you get artifacts or crashes, and then revert back to the last stable point.

    Ok, i understand that, but the thing is i don't know where to start, how much should i push it to, and should i overclock the memory too, or only the clock, i don't want an extreme overclock, only something to give a few fps boost, can you give me a starting point?
    Edit: the base gpu clock speed is 1365 and the memory clock is 2000
    Reply to ezioxtz
  3. Best answer
    Well I'd start at the stock clock speeds and work my way up in increments of 10-20 MHz (maybe 20-25 for memory clock). Do it for core clock only at first, and stop when either temps start going above 80, fans get too loud for your liking, or it becomes unstable. In the case of instability, you can try increasing voltage to be able to hit higher clock speeds. Also, I'd set power limit to max from the get go, and make sure to monitor your frequency to make sure that it's reflecting the changes you're making.

    Once you've settled on a core speed, repeat for memory speed. Here you just need to watch for instability, and once you hit it stop (can't adjust voltage like you can for core).

    If you want to be really thorough, you can run benchmarks intermittently as you're increasing clocks, to make sure clock speed increases are actually increasing real world performance.

    There's plenty of GPU overclocking guides out there, and like 95% of information will probably still apply regardless of what card you have.
    Reply to TJ Hooker
  4. TJ Hooker said:
    Well I'd start at the stock clock speeds and work my way up in increments of 10-20 MHz (maybe 20-25 for memory clock). Do it for core clock only at first, and stop when either temps start going above 80, fans get too loud for your liking, or it becomes unstable. In the case of instability, you can try increasing voltage to be able to hit higher clock speeds. Also, I'd set power limit to max from the get go, and make sure to monitor your frequency to make sure that it's reflecting the changes you're making.

    Once you've settled on a core speed, repeat for memory speed. Here you just need to watch for instability, and once you hit it stop (can't adjust voltage like you can for core).

    If you want to be really thorough, you can run benchmarks intermittently as you're increasing clocks, to make sure clock speed increases are actually increasing real world performance.

    There's plenty of GPU overclocking guides out there, and like 95% of information will probably still apply regardless of what card you have.


    Thank you very much for your detailed answer, i've learnt some new things, have a good day!
    Reply to ezioxtz
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