A general question regarding CPU overclocking & CPU Temp & Core Voltage & BSOD.

Hello, everyone!

I always wanted to know the answer about the question that I wrote on the title. I googled and researched for awhile trying to fine the answer but was not able to find a decent post that answers such question.

So,,, everyone who overclocks his/her CPU knows overclocking can cause BSOD; in addition, it typically happens when the CPU is about to hit its limit when CPU temperature is high(which is caused by high core voltage)

so... in short
1)Higher core voltage -> 2)Higher CPU temperature -> 3)BSOD.

Let's assume that I delid the CPU, re-apply decent TIM(let's say some good liquid metal), relid and overclock again. I saw several posts and videos that some liquid metal dramatically lowers the CPU temperature from 10~20 degrees.

Then here is my question(sorry for very long explanation.)

In such scenario that I wrote above, will I be able to achieve more successful overclock assuming my CPU temperature will be lower than I delided the CPU?

Thank you for reading long post!
Reply to chg911225
6 answers Last reply
More about general question cpu overclocking cpu temp core voltage bsod
  1. Actually, I've never encountered a BSOD due to temperature. It's always from a lack of voltage. Not enough voltage creates BSOD, too much voltage creates high temperatures. When you reach max temp, the CPU will throttle (slow) down to prevent damage; usually no BSOD when this happens.

    To answer your question, yes you will *can achieve higher overclock if you delid and use liquid metal because you can add more voltage without overheating. I dropped my temps by 20C by delidding and using liquid metal.

    For me I couldn't run 4.9GHz at 1.35V without reaching around 90C under stress testing. Delid + LM allowed the same 4.9GHz 1.35V at below 70C. Since temps were so good I could then go up to 1.4V allowing me the 5.0Ghz which before would always BSOD at 1.35V. (NH-D15S cooler.)

    Is it all worth it? Not really. No real world gain other than personal satisfaction of having done it.
    Reply to volkgren
  2. The chances of getting a successful overclock will not be affected by delidding, however the temps on very high overclocks will be a lot more desirable. And really, it only benefits Intel CPUs, and only when you get to ~5GHz mark which some don't even have the luck of achieving. A decent quality cooler will still be fine to cool it without delidding, however anything close to 5GHz will push the limits of any coolers, which is where delidding comes in.

    For me, the risk isn't worth the basically 0 real-world difference in performance between, say, 4.7GHz and 5GHz. Only delid if you've run into every barrier while overclocking and only care about the number, and not the actual performance.

    PS: BSODs are caused by either overvolting or undervolting. Nothing to do with temperatures.
    Reply to JalYt_Justin
  3. Hello! Thank you so much for answering my question!

    On my original post, I said I will 'assume' such scenario but I actually ordered deliding tool and liquid metal TIM just wanted to see the result. Both will arrive within few days and I will be actually see if delid & liquid metal will improve the overclocking. Currently(even though my system is not overclocked at the moment) I was able to achieve 4.5Ghz on my i5-4690k with Corsair H100i v2 AIO liquid cooler but BSOD happened sometimes randomly even after stress test. It would be great if temperature after delid &liquid metal drops a lot so that I can apply more core voltage to sustain stable overclocking.

    volkgren said:
    Actually, I've never encountered a BSOD due to temperature. It's always from a lack of voltage. Not enough voltage creates BSOD, too much voltage creates high temperatures. When you reach max temp, the CPU will throttle (slow) down to prevent damage; usually no BSOD when this happens.

    To answer your question, yes you will *can achieve higher overclock if you delid and use liquid metal because you can add more voltage without overheating. I dropped my temps by 20C by delidding and using liquid metal.

    For me I couldn't run 4.9GHz at 1.35V without reaching around 90C under stress testing. Delid + LM allowed the same 4.9GHz 1.35V at below 70C. Since temps were so good I could then go up to 1.4V allowing me the 5.0Ghz which before would always BSOD at 1.35V. (NH-D15S cooler.)

    Is it all worth it? Not really. No real world gain other than personal satisfaction of having done it.
    Reply to chg911225
  4. Thank you for your comment!

    I currently have i5-4690K which was overclocked to 4.5Ghz with my Corsair H100i v2 AIO cooler before but reset it because BSOD occured often randomly even after stress test. I shall see if delid & liquid metal might help sustaining stable overclocking, hoping temperature after delid & liquid metal will help. :)

    JalYt_Justin said:
    The chances of getting a successful overclock will not be affected by delidding, however the temps on very high overclocks will be a lot more desirable. And really, it only benefits Intel CPUs, and only when you get to ~5GHz mark which some don't even have the luck of achieving. A decent quality cooler will still be fine to cool it without delidding, however anything close to 5GHz will push the limits of any coolers, which is where delidding comes in.

    For me, the risk isn't worth the basically 0 real-world difference in performance between, say, 4.7GHz and 5GHz. Only delid if you've run into every barrier while overclocking and only care about the number, and not the actual performance.

    PS: BSODs are caused by either overvolting or undervolting. Nothing to do with temperatures.
    Reply to chg911225
  5. chg911225 said:
    Thank you for your comment!

    I currently have i5-4690K which was overclocked to 4.5Ghz with my Corsair H100i v2 AIO cooler before but reset it because BSOD occured often randomly even after stress test. I shall see if delid & liquid metal might help sustaining stable overclocking, hoping temperature after delid & liquid metal will help. :)

    JalYt_Justin said:
    The chances of getting a successful overclock will not be affected by delidding, however the temps on very high overclocks will be a lot more desirable. And really, it only benefits Intel CPUs, and only when you get to ~5GHz mark which some don't even have the luck of achieving. A decent quality cooler will still be fine to cool it without delidding, however anything close to 5GHz will push the limits of any coolers, which is where delidding comes in.

    For me, the risk isn't worth the basically 0 real-world difference in performance between, say, 4.7GHz and 5GHz. Only delid if you've run into every barrier while overclocking and only care about the number, and not the actual performance.

    PS: BSODs are caused by either overvolting or undervolting. Nothing to do with temperatures.



    Just warning you, the only change delidding will give you is a change in temperatures. If you crash at 4.5GHz, you need to give it more voltage (or if you're overvolting, less voltage. Usually isn't the case but should be said). As I said before, BSODs from overclocking are NOT caused by high temperatures unless you're hitting TJ max (thermal shutdown).

    My guess is that your temps are fine and you're simply not giving your CPU enough voltage to be stable at that clock speed.
    Reply to JalYt_Justin
  6. Alrighty. I appreciate your advice.

    I will try to apply more voltage after delid and apply liquid metal. I could have applied more voltage(beyond 1.3V) before but the temperatures was staying around 90c so I was worried about it. If liquid metal helps to overall temperature during overclocking, I will surely apply more voltage.

    JalYt_Justin said:
    chg911225 said:
    Thank you for your comment!

    I currently have i5-4690K which was overclocked to 4.5Ghz with my Corsair H100i v2 AIO cooler before but reset it because BSOD occured often randomly even after stress test. I shall see if delid & liquid metal might help sustaining stable overclocking, hoping temperature after delid & liquid metal will help. :)

    JalYt_Justin said:
    The chances of getting a successful overclock will not be affected by delidding, however the temps on very high overclocks will be a lot more desirable. And really, it only benefits Intel CPUs, and only when you get to ~5GHz mark which some don't even have the luck of achieving. A decent quality cooler will still be fine to cool it without delidding, however anything close to 5GHz will push the limits of any coolers, which is where delidding comes in.

    For me, the risk isn't worth the basically 0 real-world difference in performance between, say, 4.7GHz and 5GHz. Only delid if you've run into every barrier while overclocking and only care about the number, and not the actual performance.

    PS: BSODs are caused by either overvolting or undervolting. Nothing to do with temperatures.



    Just warning you, the only change delidding will give you is a change in temperatures. If you crash at 4.5GHz, you need to give it more voltage (or if you're overvolting, less voltage. Usually isn't the case but should be said). As I said before, BSODs from overclocking are NOT caused by high temperatures unless you're hitting TJ max (thermal shutdown).

    My guess is that your temps are fine and you're simply not giving your CPU enough voltage to be stable at that clock speed.
    Reply to chg911225
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