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Overclocking i5 4690k + Corsair H60 Hydro Cooler

Hello, this will be my first time overclocking. My friend gave me his Corsair H60, so I was wondering how my temps will be with this cooler. I've read some other threads about overclocking with this cooler, and most of them said it wasn't that great and that air coolers are better. Should I buy an air cooler instead?
This is my specs if you need it: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/n29f6X
Reply to nicholastangphotos
14 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about overclocking 4690k corsair h60 hydro cooler
  1. Best answer
    Some aircoolers can out perform it that is true, but you don't NEED to buy a better cooler air or liquid. The h60 will allow you to overclock.
    Just have some fun with overclocking, and if you happen to hit the thermal limit of that cooler before your CPU becomes unstable, you can then decide if you want to upgrade.
    Reply to AnonymousAndy
  2. AnonymousAndy said:
    Some aircoolers can out perform it that is true, but you don't NEED to buy a better cooler air or liquid. The h60 will allow you to overclock.
    Just have some fun with overclocking, and if you happen to hit the thermal limit of that cooler before your CPU becomes unstable, you can then decide if you want to upgrade.


    Sorry for asking, but what would be the thermal limit of the cooler? This will be my first time, like stated above, so i'm still trying to learn more about it.
    Reply to nicholastangphotos
  3. nicholastangphotos said:
    AnonymousAndy said:
    Some aircoolers can out perform it that is true, but you don't NEED to buy a better cooler air or liquid. The h60 will allow you to overclock.
    Just have some fun with overclocking, and if you happen to hit the thermal limit of that cooler before your CPU becomes unstable, you can then decide if you want to upgrade.


    Sorry for asking, but what would be the thermal limit of the cooler? This will be my first time, like stated above, so i'm still trying to learn more about it.


    The thermal limit is when your CPU reaches its maximum safe temperature (or whatever you want its safe temp to be) because the CPU cooler is insufficient to cool it. The TJ Max which is how hot your CPU can get before it will throttle itself, is some ridiculous number above 90C for your CPU. I wouldn't want my CPU to run hotter than 75C during 100% load.
    Reply to AnonymousAndy
  4. I have hit 5GHz with my 4690k with a Noctua NH-D14 air cooler in the winter with indoor ambient temps of about 17C/62F with the heat turned down just for testing. I keep it at 4.7GHz as a long term overclock solution and in summer with indoor ambient temps around 25C/77F it hits about 65C under load with that cooler. I have a high airflow modified Antec Nine Hundred Case, so that makes a big difference as well with regards to air coolers.

    For you, I would imagine you should be able to hit 4.4GHz or so easily. The trick is balancing the minimum amount of voltage needed for a maximum stable overclock. That's where heat control comes in to play. My Noctua is a better performer than your H60, so don't expect to get similar results. That of course doesn't even take into consideration on how good that chip is with regards to winning the silicon lottery and getting a good overclocker. I got lucky there too. Have fun and experiment in incremental steps!
    Reply to 10tacle
  5. AnonymousAndy said:
    nicholastangphotos said:
    AnonymousAndy said:
    Some aircoolers can out perform it that is true, but you don't NEED to buy a better cooler air or liquid. The h60 will allow you to overclock.
    Just have some fun with overclocking, and if you happen to hit the thermal limit of that cooler before your CPU becomes unstable, you can then decide if you want to upgrade.


    Sorry for asking, but what would be the thermal limit of the cooler? This will be my first time, like stated above, so i'm still trying to learn more about it.


    The thermal limit is when your CPU reaches its maximum safe temperature (or whatever you want its safe temp to be) because the CPU cooler is insufficient to cool it. The TJ Max which is how hot your CPU can get before it will throttle itself, is some ridiculous number above 90C for your CPU. I wouldn't want my CPU to run hotter than 75C during 100% load.


    I don't think I would want my CPU to run any higher than 75C either. Anyways, thank you for all your input!
    Reply to nicholastangphotos
  6. 10tacle said:
    I have hit 5GHz with my 4690k with a Noctua NH-D14 air cooler in the winter with indoor ambient temps of about 17C/62F with the heat turned down just for testing. I keep it at 4.7GHz as a long term overclock solution and in summer with indoor ambient temps around 25C/77F it hits about 65C under load with that cooler. I have a high airflow modified Antec Nine Hundred Case, so that makes a big difference as well with regards to air coolers.

    For you, I would imagine you should be able to hit 4.4GHz or so easily. The trick is balancing the minimum amount of voltage needed for a maximum stable overclock. That's where heat control comes in to play. My Noctua is a better performer than your H60, so don't expect to get similar results. That of course doesn't even take into consideration on how good that chip is with regards to winning the silicon lottery and getting a good overclocker. I got lucky there too. Have fun and experiment in incremental steps!


    Do you have any recommendations on what to do or how to set up for overclocking? Also, do you think I should OC my GPU as well? The games I plan on playing are PUBG, CSGO, Overwatch, etc.
    Reply to nicholastangphotos
  7. nicholastangphotos said:
    10tacle said:
    I have hit 5GHz with my 4690k with a Noctua NH-D14 air cooler in the winter with indoor ambient temps of about 17C/62F with the heat turned down just for testing. I keep it at 4.7GHz as a long term overclock solution and in summer with indoor ambient temps around 25C/77F it hits about 65C under load with that cooler. I have a high airflow modified Antec Nine Hundred Case, so that makes a big difference as well with regards to air coolers.

    For you, I would imagine you should be able to hit 4.4GHz or so easily. The trick is balancing the minimum amount of voltage needed for a maximum stable overclock. That's where heat control comes in to play. My Noctua is a better performer than your H60, so don't expect to get similar results. That of course doesn't even take into consideration on how good that chip is with regards to winning the silicon lottery and getting a good overclocker. I got lucky there too. Have fun and experiment in incremental steps!


    Do you have any recommendations on what to do or how to set up for overclocking? Also, do you think I should OC my GPU as well? The games I plan on playing are PUBG, CSGO, Overwatch, etc.


    Depending on what your monitor is, you likely don't even need to overclock your GPU yet, so I wouldn't.
    You should do a lot of heavy reading and research before you even enter the BIOS with the intent to overclock :)

    Here is a good place to start: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3038208/overclocking-cooling-water-cooling-sticky-index.html
    Reply to AnonymousAndy
  8. AnonymousAndy said:
    nicholastangphotos said:
    10tacle said:
    I have hit 5GHz with my 4690k with a Noctua NH-D14 air cooler in the winter with indoor ambient temps of about 17C/62F with the heat turned down just for testing. I keep it at 4.7GHz as a long term overclock solution and in summer with indoor ambient temps around 25C/77F it hits about 65C under load with that cooler. I have a high airflow modified Antec Nine Hundred Case, so that makes a big difference as well with regards to air coolers.

    For you, I would imagine you should be able to hit 4.4GHz or so easily. The trick is balancing the minimum amount of voltage needed for a maximum stable overclock. That's where heat control comes in to play. My Noctua is a better performer than your H60, so don't expect to get similar results. That of course doesn't even take into consideration on how good that chip is with regards to winning the silicon lottery and getting a good overclocker. I got lucky there too. Have fun and experiment in incremental steps!


    Do you have any recommendations on what to do or how to set up for overclocking? Also, do you think I should OC my GPU as well? The games I plan on playing are PUBG, CSGO, Overwatch, etc.


    Depending on what your monitor is, you likely don't even need to overclock your GPU yet, so I wouldn't.
    You should do a lot of heavy reading and research before you even enter the BIOS with the intent to overclock :)

    Here is a good place to start: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3038208/overclocking-cooling-water-cooling-sticky-index.html


    I was going to do the testing using the Intel Extreme Tuning Utility. Should I be doing it in the bios instead? Currently, I'm still researching more on it.
    Reply to nicholastangphotos
  9. nicholastangphotos said:
    AnonymousAndy said:
    nicholastangphotos said:
    10tacle said:
    I have hit 5GHz with my 4690k with a Noctua NH-D14 air cooler in the winter with indoor ambient temps of about 17C/62F with the heat turned down just for testing. I keep it at 4.7GHz as a long term overclock solution and in summer with indoor ambient temps around 25C/77F it hits about 65C under load with that cooler. I have a high airflow modified Antec Nine Hundred Case, so that makes a big difference as well with regards to air coolers.

    For you, I would imagine you should be able to hit 4.4GHz or so easily. The trick is balancing the minimum amount of voltage needed for a maximum stable overclock. That's where heat control comes in to play. My Noctua is a better performer than your H60, so don't expect to get similar results. That of course doesn't even take into consideration on how good that chip is with regards to winning the silicon lottery and getting a good overclocker. I got lucky there too. Have fun and experiment in incremental steps!


    Do you have any recommendations on what to do or how to set up for overclocking? Also, do you think I should OC my GPU as well? The games I plan on playing are PUBG, CSGO, Overwatch, etc.


    Depending on what your monitor is, you likely don't even need to overclock your GPU yet, so I wouldn't.
    You should do a lot of heavy reading and research before you even enter the BIOS with the intent to overclock :)

    Here is a good place to start: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3038208/overclocking-cooling-water-cooling-sticky-index.html


    I was going to do the testing using the Intel Extreme Tuning Utility. Should I be doing it in the bios instead? Currently, I'm still researching more on it.


    Yes, do not overclock your CPU with software within your OS. Use the BIOS.
    Reply to AnonymousAndy
  10. AnonymousAndy said:
    nicholastangphotos said:
    AnonymousAndy said:
    nicholastangphotos said:
    10tacle said:
    I have hit 5GHz with my 4690k with a Noctua NH-D14 air cooler in the winter with indoor ambient temps of about 17C/62F with the heat turned down just for testing. I keep it at 4.7GHz as a long term overclock solution and in summer with indoor ambient temps around 25C/77F it hits about 65C under load with that cooler. I have a high airflow modified Antec Nine Hundred Case, so that makes a big difference as well with regards to air coolers.

    For you, I would imagine you should be able to hit 4.4GHz or so easily. The trick is balancing the minimum amount of voltage needed for a maximum stable overclock. That's where heat control comes in to play. My Noctua is a better performer than your H60, so don't expect to get similar results. That of course doesn't even take into consideration on how good that chip is with regards to winning the silicon lottery and getting a good overclocker. I got lucky there too. Have fun and experiment in incremental steps!


    Do you have any recommendations on what to do or how to set up for overclocking? Also, do you think I should OC my GPU as well? The games I plan on playing are PUBG, CSGO, Overwatch, etc.


    Depending on what your monitor is, you likely don't even need to overclock your GPU yet, so I wouldn't.
    You should do a lot of heavy reading and research before you even enter the BIOS with the intent to overclock :)

    Here is a good place to start: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3038208/overclocking-cooling-water-cooling-sticky-index.html


    I was going to do the testing using the Intel Extreme Tuning Utility. Should I be doing it in the bios instead? Currently, I'm still researching more on it.


    Yes, do not overclock your CPU with software within your OS. Use the BIOS.


    So a bit of an update. I actually bought the NZXT Kraken X52, as it was on sale for $80. My friend told me to jump on it since it was really cheap. For the stress testing, how long should I leave it on for? I see some articles saying to leave it on for hours, while others say to leave it on for 10 min. I think I'll be ready to overclock in a couple of days when I have my day off from work.
    Reply to nicholastangphotos
  11. 5-10 minutes or sometimes even less is normally enough to expose the worst of instability problems. So if it passes the 5 minute test, its up to you if you want to stress it longer. Long tests help weed out minor instability problems, and can guarantee stability during normal use. No game is going to stress your CPU like a stress test does, so running a stress test for hours isn't required. I'd save those long tests for when you get to a point you want to stay at, as a final test before you know you're done.
    Reply to AnonymousAndy
  12. AnonymousAndy said:
    5-10 minutes or sometimes even less is normally enough to expose the worst of instability problems. So if it passes the 5 minute test, its up to you if you want to stress it longer. Long tests help weed out minor instability problems, and can guarantee stability during normal use. No game is going to stress your CPU like a stress test does, so running a stress test for hours isn't required. I'd save those long tests for when you get to a point you want to stay at, as a final test before you know you're done.


    Sorry for all the questions, but this will be the last one. I'm going to use prime95 26.6, however when I looked at it, there was 3 options along with a custom. Small FFTs, In-Place FFTs, and Blend. Which option should I go with? Thanks in advanced for everything! If you like, I'll get back to you in a few days about how my overclocking went.
    Reply to nicholastangphotos
  13. nicholastangphotos said:
    AnonymousAndy said:
    5-10 minutes or sometimes even less is normally enough to expose the worst of instability problems. So if it passes the 5 minute test, its up to you if you want to stress it longer. Long tests help weed out minor instability problems, and can guarantee stability during normal use. No game is going to stress your CPU like a stress test does, so running a stress test for hours isn't required. I'd save those long tests for when you get to a point you want to stay at, as a final test before you know you're done.


    Sorry for all the questions, but this will be the last one. I'm going to use prime95 26.6, however when I looked at it, there was 3 options along with a custom. Small FFTs, In-Place FFTs, and Blend. Which option should I go with? Thanks in advanced for everything! If you like, I'll get back to you in a few days about how my overclocking went.


    Small FFTs will generate the most stress, blend is the most realistic load.
    Please do
    Reply to AnonymousAndy
  14. AnonymousAndy said:
    Some aircoolers can out perform it that is true, but you don't NEED to buy a better cooler air or liquid. The h60 will allow you to overclock.
    Just have some fun with overclocking, and if you happen to hit the thermal limit of that cooler before your CPU becomes unstable, you can then decide if you want to upgrade.


    I'm having trouble with the core speed. I set the core speed to 42, however when I run the stress test, it says the max is 3.5ghz. I haven't touched my BCLK, as it's on auto. However, my voltage did change to what I set it to, 1.2V.
    Reply to nicholastangphotos
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