Every game I play without vsync is either really choppy despite high frame rates or has terrible tearing. How do I stop this?

Normally I would just continue using vsync. But I've recently discovered how much it limits my frames due to my monitor being a 60hz 1080p 32" TV. When i play battlefield, for example, my frame rates without vsync will drop to 60 at its lowest. But with vsync, ill get dips down to the mid 40s. So I experimented and found out that, despite having high frame rates with vsync turned off, the games are very choppy as if i have low frame rates. I've tried adaptive, fast sync, Windowed mode, tried capping frames below monitor refresh rate, etc. I know that adaptive helps a little with the frame rate drops, but that doesnt tell me why i must use vsync and thus limit my frame rate with every game. Is it because my monitor is a TV? I play my games at 1920x1080 resolution if that helps. Ive checked temps and usually get nothing above 60c on my GPU and my CPU

My GPU is Geforce Gtx 1060 6gb
My CPU is i5-7600k
And i have 16gb DDR4 memory
Reply to SmallButWhole95
9 answers Last reply
More about game play vsync choppy high frame rates terrible tearing stop
  1. When using a TV, check for a setting named (something along the lines of) "Game mode". This disables the additional processing done by the TV itself, which is appropriate for TV usage, but not as a monitor.

    The additional processing will increase lag/response time, making gameplay feel 'choppy' despite respectable framerates.
    Reply to Barty1884
  2. Barty1884 said:
    When using a TV, check for a setting named (something along the lines of) "Game mode". This disables the additional processing done by the TV itself, which is appropriate for TV usage, but not as a monitor.

    The additional processing will increase lag/response time, making gameplay feel 'choppy' despite respectable framerates.


    thanks but that didn't seem to work :/
    I play without vsync in fullscreen in Battlefield one and i get bad tearing. I play in windowed or borderless and i dont have the tearing, but looks very choppy despite high frame rate.
    Reply to SmallButWhole95
  3. SmallButWhole95 said:
    Barty1884 said:
    When using a TV, check for a setting named (something along the lines of) "Game mode". This disables the additional processing done by the TV itself, which is appropriate for TV usage, but not as a monitor.

    The additional processing will increase lag/response time, making gameplay feel 'choppy' despite respectable framerates.


    thanks but that didn't seem to work :/
    I play without vsync in fullscreen in Battlefield one and i get bad tearing. I play in windowed or borderless and i dont have the tearing, but looks very choppy despite high frame rate.



    Same happens to my while playing DotA. I think your best bet would be to play with v-sync on.
    Reply to Asbaat
  4. SmallButWhole95 said:
    Barty1884 said:
    When using a TV, check for a setting named (something along the lines of) "Game mode". This disables the additional processing done by the TV itself, which is appropriate for TV usage, but not as a monitor.

    The additional processing will increase lag/response time, making gameplay feel 'choppy' despite respectable framerates.


    thanks but that didn't seem to work :/
    I play without vsync in fullscreen in Battlefield one and i get bad tearing. I play in windowed or borderless and i dont have the tearing, but looks very choppy despite high frame rate.




    since you have a 1060 you can try adaptive vsync

    or

    install msi afterburner and you can limit fps to whatever you want that way without using vsync

    see if it helps with your choppyness and tearing
    Reply to maxalge
  5. maxalge said:
    SmallButWhole95 said:
    Barty1884 said:
    When using a TV, check for a setting named (something along the lines of) "Game mode". This disables the additional processing done by the TV itself, which is appropriate for TV usage, but not as a monitor.

    The additional processing will increase lag/response time, making gameplay feel 'choppy' despite respectable framerates.


    thanks but that didn't seem to work :/
    I play without vsync in fullscreen in Battlefield one and i get bad tearing. I play in windowed or borderless and i dont have the tearing, but looks very choppy despite high frame rate.




    since you have a 1060 you can try adaptive vsync

    or

    install msi afterburner and you can limit fps to whatever you want that way without using vsync

    see if it helps with your choppyness and tearing


    Limiting the FPS would never help with the choppy gameplay, the only way is to enable v-sync
    Reply to Asbaat
  6. You have both adaptive sync & fast sync on the 10 series cards - neither should lower fps to any extent at all ,because both will disable vsync below the refresh rate of the screen.
    Reply to madmatt30
  7. Asbaat said:
    [
    Limiting the FPS would never help with the choppy gameplay, the only way is to enable v-sync


    limiting it to a higher number than 60 would, so when he gets drops he is still over 60 fps as he has stated

    since with vsync he drops to the ~40 range


    or as madmatt30 and I have stated adaptive vsync should also help
    Reply to maxalge
  8. maxalge said:
    Asbaat said:
    [
    Limiting the FPS would never help with the choppy gameplay, the only way is to enable v-sync


    limiting it to a higher number than 60 would, so when he gets drops he is still over 60 fps as he has stated

    since with vsync he drops to the ~40 range


    or as madmatt30 and I have stated adaptive vsync should also help



    Hmm, I'll also try that, thanks!
    Reply to Asbaat
  9. Neither fast sync or adaptive should lose you any fps at all.
    Fast sync im honestly not convinced with , it works but with some screen tearing still.

    Adaptive (not the half setting) physically disabled vsync below native refresh .

    Im also a 1080p tv gamer & it works 100% perfectly for me
    Reply to madmatt30
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