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It isn't the heat that is capping my overclocking, it's the crashing. (1080)

How do I reduce or get rid of the crashing?

(in addition to reducing the afterburner settings).

My temps never, ever, ever go higher than 70% C and most of the time hover around 64%.

Problem is, any time I try to up the core clock or the memory clock, the card or software will crash, not while being idle, but if using benchmark / stress test software like Kombustor, or trying to test in a online game.

Used to be, in my experience, that the real difficulty that limited your overclocking was temperature, that's not the case for me now, anyone have any ideas?

Thanks,


info :

MSI GeForce GTX 1080 GAMING Z 8G
I7-7700K
Overclocking with Afterburner

Afterburner current working settings :

Core voltage 100%
Power limitre 107% (max)
Core Clock MHz 150
Memory Clock 760
Fan Speed AUTO
Reply to Inzababa
16 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about heat capping overclocking crashing 1080
  1. If it's not temperature, your limitation is either the power limit or the silicon lottery. Some chips simply don't overclock well.
    Reply to Leaps-from-Shadows
  2. What clock speeds are you achieving?

    Most GTX1080 seem to top out around 2100Mhz, 2150Mhz on occasion. Memory clock is not that forgiving. GDDR5X 10MT/s can only usually go about 500Mhz above stock if you are lucky. Not sure about the 11MT/s memory.

    Power target for those kind of clocks is usually around 115%.
    Reply to Eximo
  3. so power limit, voltage & offset and the levers that you have to manage the silicon lottery, you've done the offset, and the power limit, now increase the voltage, whilst watching temps.

    BTW this is where it gets risky.
    Reply to 13thmonkey
  4. Eximo said:
    What clock speeds are you achieving?

    Most GTX1080 seem to top out around 2100Mhz, 2150Mhz on occasion. Memory clock is not that forgiving. GDDR5X 10MT/s can only usually go about 500Mhz above stock if you are lucky. Not sure about the 11MT/s memory.

    Power target for those kind of clocks is usually around 115%.


    I was getting around 2100 or just under, using the benchmark option in Kombustor, the highest score I got was 13740, but funny thing is, that increase memory clock speed or the gpu would sometimes lower the results.

    In the end my stable benchmark score was 13400 or so.
    Reply to Inzababa
  5. 13thmonkey said:
    so power limit, voltage & offset and the levers that you have to manage the silicon lottery, you've done the offset, and the power limit, now increase the voltage, whilst watching temps.

    BTW this is where it gets risky.


    hmm I thought I increased the voltage? (to the max)

    Is there an option in Afterburner I need to click in settings to unhide it or something?
    Reply to Inzababa
  6. PS. I don't know much about electricity, but I go a high end "much more than enough in fact probably over the top" power box (was planning on using more than one gcard in future etc but IT vendors all told me it was much too much).

    I don't suppose this means I should be able to increase the voltage by a bunch?
    Reply to Inzababa
  7. sorry you might well have done, in which case you need to figure out how to increase the voltage and/or power limit beyond their proscribed maximums.
    Reply to 13thmonkey
  8. The PSU providing it is sufficient doesn't help you with 'more voltage' what PSU is it by the way. I find IT vendors talk BS a lot, unless you are lucky.
    Reply to 13thmonkey
  9. That might depend on the card. I know mine is a reference board, and I don't have a voltage option. Many of the screenshots I took a quick look at also had the voltage control greyed out.
    Reply to Eximo
  10. From what I have seen more voltage/power to Pascal just makes it hotter and worse at overclocking. Some of the overclockers out there recommend reducing voltage to achieve the best results. And as you noticed, running the highest possible stable settings can lead to lower numbers. Usually you want to back off just a little from the maximum stable point.
    Reply to Eximo
  11. 13thmonkey said:
    The PSU providing it is sufficient doesn't help you with 'more voltage' what PSU is it by the way. I find IT vendors talk BS a lot, unless you are lucky.


    It's "Corsair HX850i 80PLUS Platinum" (vendor told me my PC only needed half those Wats)
    Reply to Inzababa
  12. that's fine then, PSU is very good.
    Reply to 13thmonkey
  13. Eximo said:
    From what I have seen more voltage/power to Pascal just makes it hotter and worse at overclocking. Some of the overclockers out there recommend reducing voltage to achieve the best results. And as you noticed, running the highest possible stable settings can lead to lower numbers. Usually you want to back off just a little from the maximum stable point.


    In my experience with this card and rig, the only things to have any kind of stability consequences is the Core Clock and memory clock speeds.

    Putting Core Voltage on zero or 100 has no consequences at all, maxed out it did improve performance a little (if I'm not mistaken) while the power limit increase from 100 to maximum, which is 107, that had pretty good positive results.

    In short, the only 2 variables creating potential instability are the core clock and memory clock, they are also the two variables who can potentially increase performance the most QQ


    I suppose as has been mentioned, in my case, the only solution would be to find some other way to increase the power (which traditionally is what heats up the card but here I'm far away from any kind of heating issues).
    Reply to Inzababa
  14. yes, because as you go further from stock you need more voltage for the signal to be 'stable' voltage by itself does nothing, but it does allow higher offsets to be used. The power limit allows a higher boost from your offset.

    I'm going to be brutally honest here, you need to investigate OCing because you're confused as to the point of voltage, and I don't think you know nearly enough to go any further without significant risk of your card dying, either instantly, or in 6 months.
    Reply to 13thmonkey
  15. Best answer
    That isn't my conclusion. If you are getting around 2100Mhz, that is about as far as most chips will go.

    A little perusing of the 1080 owner's club at overclock.net will show you many people running air cooled cards between 2000 and 2100Mhz. Apparently a lot of the stock reference cards are limited to a 107% power limit. Mine happens to be an EVGA SC, so they must have set it higher in the vBIOS.

    Some people were able to successfully overwrite the vBIOS of reference boards with board partner reference board vBIOS and increase limits that way. Others say modifying the voltage shunt is worthwhile.

    Highest numbers poking around with people who were serious about every last clock (without using LN2) were getting 2200-2250Mhz. Usually custom water cooling and modified cards.
    Reply to Eximo
  16. ok thanks a lot
    Reply to Inzababa
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