Ryzen 1600X (B350) build has consistent system shutdown after loading any games (CPU debug LED on)

Hello everyone, I am at wit's end. Sorry for the huge post, but I don't want to leave out any possible leads.


TL;DR: My rig completely restarts whenever I load any game. It is extremely unstable, and I suspect a defective 1600X CPU.


I have a weird problem happening with my Ryzen 1600X build, and I’m running out of ideas for diagnosing the issue. I think I may have to RMA most likely my CPU, though possibly my motherboard and/or RAM.

My system specs: (all running at cleared-CMOS default frequencies and voltages)
-Ryzen 1600X (Hyper 212 Evo Cooler) on Ryzen Balanced Power Plan chipset
-16GB (2x8GB) Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 (rated for 3200MHz) running @ 2133MHz default
-MSI Tomahawk B350 (updated to bios v19)
-MSI Duke GTX 1080 8GB (WHQL 388 drivers)
-EVGA Supernova NEX750G
-Windows 10 (fall creators update)

I have the AMD balanced power plan chipset installed, I have a fresh install of windows, and windows is updated to the newest fall creators update along with all appropriate updated drivers.

My issue:
My system completely shuts down when booting up games like Arma 3, PUBG, and RBS Siege. It shuts down the same way as if your CPU was too overclocked and your system would shut down to prevent damage. The system completely goes black, my keyboard LEDs cycles off, my case fans and LEDs stay lit and spinning, but my system fully reboots.

My system is currently capable of posting, getting into the bios (to play around with settings), and even boots into windows without issue. In fact, I could use my system seemingly reliably for Microsoft Office, web browsing, etc as long as I don't load games.

My system has been flawless after putting it together around June this year, especially ever since I reinstalled windows. My GTX 1080 had no issues destroying games at 1440p, and my 1600X could demolish even Arma 3 maxed out at 60 fps. I used to be able to play games for hours on end with complete reliability. I never bothered overclocking.

However, within the past few months I tried the following overclock:
- CPU freq. @ 3.9 GHz
- Loadline Calibration set to mode 1 (10%)
- BIOS CPU voltage set to 1.375v (the actual CPU voltage reported by the mobo would go as high as 1.42v under load but would drop down and not go over that voltage)
- RAM XMP profile with frequency @ 3200MHz, 1.6v, and 14-16-16-16-18 timings
- AMD Cool'n'Quiet enabled
- CPU Overvoltage protection enabled
Note: when messing with overclock settings, my system would post instantly and always. I never had to wait for my system to do any "memory post retries".

My temperatures would never go above 50*C while gaming, so they were never a problem.

At first I was able to game for a couple hours before my system would crash. Soon after, I started noticing how it would take less and less time during gaming for my system to crash and the CPU or DRAM debug light would show up on my mobo. I have since removed all overclock setting by clearing CMOS and games like Arma 3 barely make it to the menu before shutting down. Even RBS Siege crashes at the menu for me.

It got so bad today that I tried to swap my 2 RAM DIMMs from the B slots to the A slots (thinking it may help), and that caused BSOD in windows. It got so bad that my PC completely stopped posting. I took apart my entire rig, re-seated my CPU, put new thermal paste on, put my RAM back into the original B slots, and I am lucky enough to boot into Windows now. Games are at a 100% shutdown rate now, where I can't even make it the main menu.

I tried to overclock in bios again just to try to diagnose problems, and my rig has a hard time posting with super conservative overclocks like 3.7GHz @ 1.36v. It would take my PC 5 attempts to self-post until it finally gets into bios again. Whenever it posts and crashes, it almost always has the CPU debug light on, indicating an issue with the CPU.


I use my PC every day for college classes, so I don't have time to mess around with all the potential RMAs for my parts. If I have to RMA an item, I need to be sure that that is the defective part. Perhaps someone here can point me in the right direction.

Thanks in advance.


***UPDATE***
I have been able to run Prime95 Blend Test, CPU-Z stress test, and Cinebench R15 for over an hour without any crashes or artifacts. However, as soon as I load up a Heaven benchmark on top of these stress tests, it only takes about 1-2 minutes in until my system shuts down and reboots.

I took a recording of my motherboard's debug lights as the crash happens, and it shows that the CPU and DRAM LEDs come on first, hang for a second, turn off, and then the VGA LED turns on for a few seconds (indicating an issue with the GPU).

I went ahead and recorded the debug LEDs as they crashed in RBS Siege, and it happened exactly in the same sequence and order as it did for the stress tests.
Reply to Phil135
7 answers Last reply
More about ryzen 1600x b350 build consistent system shutdown loading games cpu debug led
  1. sounds like a bad power supply cutting out under load. try a different one.
    Reply to CraZyNOTRT
  2. CraZyNOTRT said:
    sounds like a bad power supply cutting out under load. try a different one.


    My PSU is about 3 years old so I could see that being a factor. Do power supplies really degrade that quickly..?

    Also, is there a software or technique that I could use to test the stability of my PSU? I don't have an extra power supply lying around and it would hurt pretty bad for me right now to waste money on a PSU if that isn't the issue :/
    Reply to Phil135
  3. I've had new power supplies fail after 2 days. Random shutdown during high loads and gaming. Then it finally crapped out.

    Do a video card stress test, then CPU stress test. Then run both at the same time. If it quits on the CPU or GPU test, the CPU or GPU maybe the issue. If you system shuts down while running both probably power supply.
    "Will this PC run this game?" Answered in a more or less complicated manner.
    Whether a PC can run a game and how well it will do at it depends on multiple factors. Some of these factors play a bigger role than others. Remember, if the game you are interested in hasn't been released yet and there are no benchmarks out there, this... Read More
    Reply to CraZyNOTRT
  4. CraZyNOTRT said:
    I've had new power supplies fail after 2 days. Random shutdown during high loads and gaming. Then it finally crapped out.

    Do a video card stress test, then CPU stress test. Then run both at the same time. If it quits on the CPU or GPU test, the CPU or GPU maybe the issue. If you system shuts down while running both probably power supply.


    Okay, after spending hours troubleshooting and ruling out issues, I think my MSI Duke GTX 1080 is the problem...
    I swapped in an old Radeon HD 4850 into my rig and booted up with no issues. I was able to play Arma 3 maxed out (at 12 fps, mind you), and even run Heaven maxed out while maxing out CPU-Z stress testing, Prime 95 Blend, and R15 with no problems for 40 mins. It looked as though my mobo, psu, ram, and cpu were not the issue.

    To solidify this, I even went into bios and overclocked to 4GHz @ 1.3750v and hit all time high benchmark scores with stability in stress tests. I know that my 1080 is the problem now because my whole system shuts down the moment there is any sort of load on the GPU, but I have yet to try with rolled back NVIDIA drivers...
    Reply to Phil135
  5. It is possible you got a bad 1080.
    It may still be under a manufacturer warranty so contact whoever "made" your card evga/msi/asus/ect


    But if it is your drivers:
    If you have graphics or driver issues, one of the most common fixes is a clean uninstall and removal of your graphics drivers.

    To uninstall your drivers, first download and run Display Driver Uninstaller, and follow it's recommendations of booting into safe mode and ect.
    (This is a direct download link so you don't grab the wrong version)
    http://www.guru3d.com/files-get/display-driver-uninstaller-download,20.html

    You'll download a compressed file called "[Guru3D.com]-DDU.zip"
    Right click and choose extract.
    Go into the folder and run the DDU v##.##.exe
    This will extract more files to this folder.
    Run Display Driver Uninstaller.exe
    Choose Yes when it asks you to boot into SafeMode.
    After you've rebooted into safe mode.
    When DDU comes up, if it hasn't selected your GPU manufacturer (Nvidia/AMD/Intel) then choose it from the drop down list
    Press the Clean and Restart option
    If a window comes up asking to disable the Windows automatic installation of display drivers click yes.

    After (or before removing the old drivers, just put the new ones on the desktop or somewhere handy) rebooting back into Windows, manually download the latest drivers from Nvidia or AMD, don't use auto detect, choose you GPU model and OS from the drop down lists.
    Nvidia: http://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us
    AMD: http://support.amd.com/en-us/download
    Intel: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/detect.html
    Reply to James Mason
  6. James Mason said:
    It is possible you got a bad 1080.
    It may still be under a manufacturer warranty so contact whoever "made" your card evga/msi/asus/ect


    But if it is your drivers:
    If you have graphics or driver issues, one of the most common fixes is a clean uninstall and removal of your graphics drivers.

    To uninstall your drivers, first download and run Display Driver Uninstaller, and follow it's recommendations of booting into safe mode and ect.
    (This is a direct download link so you don't grab the wrong version)
    http://www.guru3d.com/files-get/display-driver-uninstaller-download,20.html

    You'll download a compressed file called "[Guru3D.com]-DDU.zip"
    Right click and choose extract.
    Go into the folder and run the DDU v##.##.exe
    This will extract more files to this folder.
    Run Display Driver Uninstaller.exe
    Choose Yes when it asks you to boot into SafeMode.
    After you've rebooted into safe mode.
    When DDU comes up, if it hasn't selected your GPU manufacturer (Nvidia/AMD/Intel) then choose it from the drop down list
    Press the Clean and Restart option
    If a window comes up asking to disable the Windows automatic installation of display drivers click yes.

    After (or before removing the old drivers, just put the new ones on the desktop or somewhere handy) rebooting back into Windows, manually download the latest drivers from Nvidia or AMD, don't use auto detect, choose you GPU model and OS from the drop down lists.
    Nvidia: http://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us
    AMD: http://support.amd.com/en-us/download
    Intel: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/detect.html


    Thank you for the walkthrough. I did do a display driver uninstall/reinstall through the GeForce driver app and that didn't solve anything, but I will try the DDU safe mode route when I have some more time off from college.

    I also tried installing another GPU (an older MSI Radeon HD 6950 2GB) into my system to see if it kept crashing, and I found that it does the exact same thing: It crashes as soon as I load up any sort of graphics intensive program/game. I'm starting to go slightly mad here and am back to considering RMAing my CPU or mobo...

    I really don't see why it would be my PSU since my PSU is only a few years old, EVGA 750W, and is a reputable model (Supernova NEX750G). If the the driver DDU safe mode reinstall doesn't work, I'm just going to start RMAing everything and see what fixes it... :cry:
    Reply to Phil135
  7. Actually, in that case it sounds like it still might be a PSU issue. Especially since your can run cpu power intensive programs like P95 and CR15, etc.

    The PSU may have an defect issue related to graphics card power delivery. Its very suspect that even the 6950 had the issue, but the cpu remains able to run high-power benchmarks.
    Reply to CooLWoLF
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